RailUK Forums
RailUK Forums > Other Rail & Transport > Modelling, Memorabilia & Publications


Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 23rd December 2016, 11:20   #1
BlythPower
Member
 
BlythPower's Avatar
 
Join Date: 15 Jan 2009
Location: Kenilworth
Posts: 738
Unhappy Ian Allan Publishing Gone...

...according to their Facebook page.

Quote:
ANNOUNCEMENT - All Ian Allan Publishing titles have been sold - although the imprint name has not been transferred - together with the OPC imprint and the 'abc' brand, to Crecy Books with immediate effect.
__________________
Riding InterCity trains, dressed in European grey.
BlythPower is offline   Reply With Quote
Registered users do not see these banners - join today!
Old 23rd December 2016, 15:01   #2
Paul Sidorczuk
Xenophon philosopher
Veteran Member
 
Paul Sidorczuk's Avatar
 
Join Date: 17 Apr 2011
Location: Very rural Cheshire
Posts: 22,008
Default

I thought that the correct name was that of Crecy Publishing.
__________________
"A cynic, when he smells flowers, looks around for a coffin"..H.L.Mencken.
Sent from my stone monolith using cuneiform and runic symbols.
Paul Sidorczuk is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 23rd December 2016, 19:36   #3
Bevan Price
Established Member
 
Bevan Price's Avatar
 
Join Date: 22 Apr 2010
Posts: 2,816
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Sidorczuk View Post
I thought that the correct name was that of Crecy Publishing.
Yes. see.

http://www.crecy.co.uk/who-are-we1?o...d126045bdcd92b


Site message is unclear about whether the sale includes the 2 remaining Ian Allan shops.
Bevan Price is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23rd December 2016, 21:49   #4
John Webb
Member
 
Join Date: 5 Jun 2010
Location: St Albans
Posts: 970
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bevan Price View Post
Yes. see.

http://www.crecy.co.uk/who-are-we1?o...d126045bdcd92b


Site message is unclear about whether the sale includes the 2 remaining Ian Allan shops.
From the page linked to above:
Quote:
Ian Allan Publishing will continue to publish its ‘Lewis Masonic’ imprint and run its dedicated bookshops in London and Birmingham. The Ian Allan Group’s other businesses including masonic publishing of books and magazines, book and model shops and specialist online retailing, property, business travel management, motor franchises and organics will continue to be developed.
So I assume they remain open. Curious they talk about '.....book and model shops.......will continue to be developed.' after closing the Manchester shop!

Last edited by John Webb; 23rd December 2016 at 21:51.
John Webb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23rd December 2016, 22:00   #5
deltic
Established Member
 
Join Date: 8 Feb 2010
Posts: 1,430
Default

Strange mix of business activity
deltic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24th December 2016, 00:16   #6
Busaholic
Established Member
 
Join Date: 7 Jun 2014
Posts: 5,091
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by deltic View Post
Strange mix of business activity
I believe Ian Allan himself was an active Freemason and probably saw a good business opportunity in developing a list for others involved in the 'craft'. Being a bookseller with an interest in public transport, I had a regular visit from an Ian Allan rep who did once mention the masonic books, and I did agree to take a small selection, as the local lodge was very near my shop. I seem to remember one individual bought all the titles, over a period of months, but I never reordered as I'm ambivalent (at best) over Freemasonry.
Busaholic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25th December 2016, 01:15   #7
swanhill41
Member
 
Join Date: 8 Nov 2016
Location: Fleetwood
Posts: 26
Default

Ian Allan died earlier this year and it was common knowledge amongst railway booksellers etc,that once the old man was buried that the son who must be retiring age ,would unload with due speed....Don't forget that all railway titles were sold 3 years or so ago

Frankly the railway book market is in a terminal decline in the general sector,which is where the IA publications were aimed...Note it is the OPC and ABC imprints mentioned

It is the short run specialists such as Lightmoor/Black Dwarf,Oakwood although since sale some doubts and other small run publishers may survive.

Their books in recent years were always biggish runs,but very limited sales.

No after 70 years IA is dead long live ????
swanhill41 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25th December 2016, 10:19   #8
TrainfanBen
Comprised of one brain.
Member
 
TrainfanBen's Avatar
 
Join Date: 30 Oct 2010
Location: Coventry.
Posts: 156
Default

I suppose it will be a relief to some that at least the shops aren't closing. Although I'm sorry to say it, I'm not really sure how long they will last. With it being such a niche market.

Hope they're around for sometime, as they offer some unique books.

Thanks for the info here
__________________
"Once an engine attached to a train, was afraid of a few drops of rain..."
TrainfanBen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25th December 2016, 13:11   #9
2392
Member
 
Join Date: 7 Apr 2015
Location: Felling on Tyne
Posts: 26
Default

Indeed and somewhat sadly perhaps, railway books in particular seem to be in almost terminal decline as already stated, along with one or two other similar niche areas. You just need to pop into the larger branches of W.H. Smtih' and you'll be lucky if there's half a shelf or so at best of rail related books available. Where as in the past there'd be a whole section or at least 3-4 shelves of titles.
2392 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25th December 2016, 13:30   #10
fowler9
Established Member
 
fowler9's Avatar
 
Join Date: 29 Oct 2013
Posts: 5,229
Default

I think the thing is the railways are gradually becoming less interesting. You know pretty much what kind of multiple unit is going to be on which clock face train service.
--- old post above --- --- new post below ---
What I mean is there is little to no deviation from the norm. If it is the half hourly Liverpool to Birmingham service it is going to be a 350 or it is going to be cancelled. You aren't going to get 56015 dropping on the front of a cross country service. You aren't going to get a pair of 20's on a Preston to Liverpool service, you aren't going to get a none eth 37 on a Liverpool to Cardiff.
__________________
Why do they always send the poor!

Last edited by fowler9; 25th December 2016 at 13:30. Reason: Double post prevention system
fowler9 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25th December 2016, 21:19   #11
Bevan Price
Established Member
 
Bevan Price's Avatar
 
Join Date: 22 Apr 2010
Posts: 2,816
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by 2392 View Post
Indeed and somewhat sadly perhaps, railway books in particular seem to be in almost terminal decline as already stated, along with one or two other similar niche areas. You just need to pop into the larger branches of W.H. Smtih' and you'll be lucky if there's half a shelf or so at best of rail related books available. Where as in the past there'd be a whole section or at least 3-4 shelves of titles.
It is not just transport books that have disappeared from WH Smith - they seem more interested in selling assorted "food" these days.
Bevan Price is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25th December 2016, 22:57   #12
thedbdiboy
Member
 
Join Date: 10 Sep 2011
Posts: 307
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by fowler9 View Post
I think the thing is the railways are gradually becoming less interesting. You know pretty much what kind of multiple unit is going to be on which clock face train service.
--- old post above --- --- new post below ---
What I mean is there is little to no deviation from the norm. If it is the half hourly Liverpool to Birmingham service it is going to be a 350 or it is going to be cancelled. You aren't going to get 56015 dropping on the front of a cross country service. You aren't going to get a pair of 20's on a Preston to Liverpool service, you aren't going to get a none eth 37 on a Liverpool to Cardiff.
I don't think that's behind it at all - quite simply, 20, 30, 40 years ago you relied on books and pamphlets for information that nowadays can be shared online. There are many 'old school enthusiasts with large accumulated book collections but as they pass on these come on the market and are frankly vastly exceeding demand. Meanwhile, the enthusiast for the modern scene has forums, flickr, realtraintimes etc and doesn't need to go browsing in a bookshop to further their interest.
thedbdiboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26th December 2016, 17:51   #13
Shaw S Hunter
Member
 
Join Date: 21 Apr 2016
Location: Sunny South Lancs
Posts: 788
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by thedbdiboy View Post
I don't think that's behind it at all - quite simply, 20, 30, 40 years ago you relied on books and pamphlets for information that nowadays can be shared online. There are many 'old school enthusiasts with large accumulated book collections but as they pass on these come on the market and are frankly vastly exceeding demand. Meanwhile, the enthusiast for the modern scene has forums, flickr, realtraintimes etc and doesn't need to go browsing in a bookshop to further their interest.
While I agree with this up to a point I do think that for "history" there is no substitute (so far!) for a well researched and written book. When I first became interested in railways I spent many months working my way through the local library's collection of the David & Charles series of regional railway histories. I do not think there has ever been any other publicly available resource which covered the subject so well and I regret not having purchased them later when funds became available. And I would suggest the same is true of locomotive histories too. I suspect that there is little appetite for reading such large bulks of information from a website. Perhaps some day these sorts of publications will become available as e-books, which ought to be the future for publications generally.

But when it comes to spotting ABCs there is no doubt that the internet is a much more reliable way of keeping up to date.
Shaw S Hunter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26th December 2016, 18:06   #14
bramling
Established Member
 
Join Date: 5 Mar 2012
Location: South East
Posts: 2,096
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by thedbdiboy View Post
I don't think that's behind it at all - quite simply, 20, 30, 40 years ago you relied on books and pamphlets for information that nowadays can be shared online. There are many 'old school enthusiasts with large accumulated book collections but as they pass on these come on the market and are frankly vastly exceeding demand. Meanwhile, the enthusiast for the modern scene has forums, flickr, realtraintimes etc and doesn't need to go browsing in a bookshop to further their interest.
Whilst I see the general point, I'd say that the price of 2nd-hand railway books is as high as it's ever been, and certainly my local (non-railway-specialist) bookshops seem to have a pretty healthy turnover of such books, indicating that there's certainly a market for them.

There's certainly masses of factual stuff that can only be found in a book.

Whilst I can see things gradually going in the direction of internet / PDF / etc, I think we're still in the early stages of a fairly gradual process.
bramling is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27th December 2016, 00:47   #15
swanhill41
Member
 
Join Date: 8 Nov 2016
Location: Fleetwood
Posts: 26
Default

Bramling....The actual selling price for most s/hand railway books is very low.

As a secondhand rail bookseller on line,the average IA type book will make £5-£7 tops,and that usually includes postage ...It can be said that the only books that hold or increase there value are books such as Colin Giffords,Dow Great Central etc ,books that are unique histories ,unable to better as with Dows Great Centr 3 parter,books that are again unique and have controlled print runs,Like Halfway to Heaven.

Take it fro me,that over the years IA,D&C and SLP as example have printed large runs,for book clubs,thus completly killing the market in terms of holding value.

It takes the WSP approach of top quality,writing,checking of facts and in case of Paul Karau's WSP a unique and quirky way of printing/publication..

No there is too much junk being published at present,Paul Atterbury is one of the worst for this.

With the shake out of publishers ,I feel/know will be reduction of printing/publication of rail books...The quality operaters like WSP and say Black Dwarf will do well based on quality

Oh and David Allen at Booklaw is a bit of a pain as although he has an RRP on his new books,never sells at that,and allied with his reminder activities in the past has again knocked prices downwards!
swanhill41 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump



All times are GMT +1. The time now is 13:56.
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8
© RailUK Forums 2005 - 2017