RailUK Forums
RailUK Forums > UK Railway Forums > Infrastructure & Stations

Click to buy your tickets through RailUK Booking engine

Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools
Old 26th December 2014, 17:43   #1
thenorthern
Established Member
 
Join Date: 27 May 2013
Posts: 2,940
Default Salford Docks Freight Tunnel

Looking at an old map I notice there was once a tunnel to Salford Docks from where the Windsor Link now in.

Where abouts did this tunnel run and is any of it still visible also does anyone know when it closed?

Cheers to anyone who knows.
thenorthern is offline  
Registered users do not see these banners - join today!
Old 26th December 2014, 18:32   #2
Paul Sidorczuk
Xenophon philosopher
Veteran Member
 
Paul Sidorczuk's Avatar
 
Join Date: 17 Apr 2011
Location: Very rural Cheshire
Posts: 22,416
Default

The Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway opened the tunnel ( I think that 1898 was the year of opening ) from the Windsor Bridge goods complex to the docks and I feel that the areas between docks 8 and 9 were the access point.
__________________
"A cynic, when he smells flowers, looks around for a coffin"..H.L.Mencken.
Sent from my stone monolith using cuneiform and runic symbols.

Last edited by Paul Sidorczuk; 26th December 2014 at 19:00. Reason: Year of opening added.
Paul Sidorczuk is offline  
Old 26th December 2014, 18:37   #3
MarkyT
Established Member
 
MarkyT's Avatar
 
Join Date: 20 May 2012
Location: Torbay
Posts: 1,921
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by thenorthern View Post
Looking at an old map I notice there was once a tunnel to Salford Docks from where the Windsor Link now in.

Where abouts did this tunnel run and is any of it still visible also does anyone know when it closed?

Cheers to anyone who knows.

As shown here on this 1946 6" OS map (revised 1938 so doesn't reflect war damage):

http://maps.nls.uk/view/102339522#zo...4116&layers=BT

emerging under Trafford Road between Nos. 8 and 9 Docks.

I doubt any trace remains looking at all the old terraced streets the tunnel passed beneath, of which there is not a trace remaining on modern maps and aerial images.
MarkyT is offline  
Old 26th December 2014, 18:41   #4
Geeves
Member
 
Join Date: 6 Jan 2009
Location: Rochdale
Posts: 646
Default

I dont know the closure dates but Ive had a look into this myself in the past

The different coloured wall on this google street view is the top of the former nothern portal dropping down from a steep cutting towards the docks. The tunnel its self was also quite a drop/climb depending on direction of course!

https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@53.48...b7pA!2e0?hl=en

At the southern end it went under Trafford Rd where the Morrisons is now, I walked along here and its not visible at all so far as I could tell

https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@53.47...3f3w!2e0?hl=en

Fairly sure it came out here at the same angle as this road.
Geeves is offline  
Old 26th December 2014, 23:41   #5
HowardGWR
Established Member
 
Join Date: 30 Jan 2013
Posts: 3,418
Default

As an aside thanks @MarkyT for directing to the National library of Scotland where they have all the maps of England online, that the privatised OS down here charge for.
HowardGWR is offline  
Old 27th December 2014, 00:16   #6
dysonsphere
Member
 
Join Date: 22 Jan 2013
Posts: 518
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by HowardGWR View Post
As an aside thanks @MarkyT for directing to the National library of Scotland where they have all the maps of England online, that the privatised OS down here charge for.

And my thx also
dysonsphere is offline  
Old 27th December 2014, 04:37   #7
Tomnick
Established Member
 
Join Date: 10 Jun 2005
Posts: 4,397
Default

Some more info here too.
Tomnick is offline  
Old 27th December 2014, 08:52   #8
Springs Branch
Member
 
Springs Branch's Avatar
 
Join Date: 7 Nov 2013
Location: Where my keyboard has no £ key
Posts: 392
Default

The line was sometimes known as the New Barns branch and was built by the L&YR, not surprisingly, soon after the opening of the Ship Canal and Salford Docks in 1894.

If you can get your hands on Bob Pixton's book Liverpool & Manchester No.3: Lancashire & Yorkshire Lines, it has two pages of photos of the branch with descriptive captions.
Copyright prevents me scanning and posting here, but some brief snippets are:-
- Opening date 28 March 1898.
- Closing date 15 June 1963.
- Interfaced with the extensive Manchester Ship Canal Railway at New Barns Junction, with marshalling yards between No.8 and No.9 Docks.
- A passenger platform was in use for a few years at the end of the branch, serving a racecourse in the vicinity. The racecourse closed around 1901 (to allow construction of No.9 Dock) and there were no more regular passenger trains. Excursions for local workers and children occasionally used the platform until 1939.
- The gradient from the docks was quite steep: 1-in-47 for 30 chains from passing underneath the LNWR Chat Moss lines up to Windsor Bridge Jct.

Much of the branch was in tunnels or deep, brick-lined cuttings. A correspondent on a Historic Salford Forum has commented that the cuttings were always in a filthy condition due to local residents dumping all sorts of refuse, household rubbish, dead cats & dogs and the like over the walls onto the track below - and this was in "The Good Old Days!"
Springs Branch is offline  
Old 27th December 2014, 10:02   #9
Wavertreelad
Member
 
Join Date: 24 Feb 2013
Posts: 689
Default

As a regular visitor with my Dad to Salford Docks in the 1960's I can remember trains emerging from the tunnel into the huge marshalling yard between No 8 and No 9 Dock and this was almost certainly prior to 1965/1966, although I can remember the brand new Manchester Liners House being constructed on part of the site. I cannot recall if it breached the tracks into the tunnel, but it was certainly very close. The building opened in 1969 and today, Manchester Liners House is called Furness House, after the company was acquired by Furness Withy Shipping in 1970. They split the business in two, selling the North American business to CY Tung Group, owners of OOCL and the Mediterranean business to Ellerman's who subsequently sold it to Hamburg Sud who have made it their UK main office. Incidentally Manchester Liners were the first British shipping line to operate deep sea containerships with their weekly service from Salford's No 9 dock to Montreal. Ultimately, the ships grew too big and could not navigate the Manchester Ship Canal so you could say they also caused the eventual downfall of the Ship Canal. Ironically that same service operates from Seaforth by OOCL in partnership with Hapag Lloyd and MSC. I also now work over the road and from our 13th floor office we have a panoramic view of the entire dock system which has changed so much in the last fifty years.

Last edited by Wavertreelad; 27th December 2014 at 10:05.
Wavertreelad is offline  
Old 27th December 2014, 11:58   #10
snowball
Established Member
 
Join Date: 4 Mar 2013
Location: Leeds
Posts: 3,403
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by HowardGWR View Post
As an aside thanks @MarkyT for directing to the National library of Scotland where they have all the maps of England online, that the privatised OS down here charge for.
http://www.old-maps.co.uk has some larger scale ones that I think the National Library of Scotland don't have (lots of 1:2500 and occasional ones even larger). The site primarily exists to sell paper copies of maps but free online viewing is possible. However its user interface underwent a change for the worse a month or two ago.

Last edited by snowball; 27th December 2014 at 12:20.
snowball is offline  
Old 27th December 2014, 12:43   #11
Senex
Established Member
 
Join Date: 1 Apr 2014
Location: York
Posts: 1,258
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by HowardGWR View Post
As an aside thanks @MarkyT for directing to the National library of Scotland where they have all the maps of England online, that the privatised OS down here charge for.
They get as far as having all the 6" maps of England on line, which is a superb resource for all of us south of the border. We could wish for the 25" maps, but understandably I think they don't do that for us. But if your research takes you to Scottish railways, then the wealth of maps available for free access on the NLS site is absolutely stunning. It makes one very conscious indeed of just how badly we are treated by the OS and its minions here in England with the rather poor and hideously expensive Old Maps web-site, and also the failure of the British Library to do anything like its Scottish opposite number.
Senex is offline  
Old 27th December 2014, 12:50   #12
MarkyT
Established Member
 
MarkyT's Avatar
 
Join Date: 20 May 2012
Location: Torbay
Posts: 1,921
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by snowball View Post
http://www.old-maps.co.uk . . . its user interface underwent a change for the worse a month or two ago.
I think the site is better now than last time I looked, at least at the map viewing level itself which you can display full screen at reasonable magnification, although it is annoying you have to select the area you want to investigate via the search or gazetteer interface, rather than just zooming in from an overview map like the nls maps. Also the prices even for pdfs are still extortionate. Fine for commercial purposes and the occasional one off "what was my street like in the 1800's enquiry", but for us amateur railway historians and engineers surveying far and wide £11 to £16 per sheet is much too expensive. At least they allow us to view them on screen properly now, and from that one can create new derivative maps if desired.

Last edited by MarkyT; 27th December 2014 at 12:58.
MarkyT is offline  
Old 27th December 2014, 13:00   #13
snowball
Established Member
 
Join Date: 4 Mar 2013
Location: Leeds
Posts: 3,403
Default

I've never had any interest in using the old-maps site to buy a paper map! But I've learned useful information from it scores of times over the years.

The user interface has improved in the few weeks since I last looked at it. I think I must have seen a poor first stage of the recent changes.

I've just discovered some remarkable detail there that I've reported in the Farnworth Tunnel Electrification thread.
snowball is offline  
Old 27th December 2014, 18:47   #14
snail
Slow Train
Established Member
 
Join Date: 16 Jun 2011
Location: t'North
Posts: 1,726
Default

Lancashire CC have a useful mapping application called Mario that has some older maps and aerial photos of parts of Lancashire. Dragging my point on topic, the 1950s 1" OS map shows the Salford Docks line quite clearly.
snail is offline  
Old 29th December 2014, 03:58   #15
thenorthern
Established Member
 
Join Date: 27 May 2013
Posts: 2,940
Default

I was talking to someone the other day who said that there should be a Salford Docks National Rail station which made me think of the tunnel, had it of remained open would a Salford Quays station be viable?
thenorthern is offline  
Closed Thread

Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump



All times are GMT +1. The time now is 11:14.
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8
© RailUK Forums 2005 - 2017