2 policewoman spoke to me In Edinburgh waverly

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Englandisgreat, 24 Jul 2012.

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  1. Flamingo

    Flamingo Established Member

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    My record was a pint in around 6 seconds. I could probably still do it, but would not be able to drink much more after it!
     
  2. CarterUSM

    CarterUSM Established Member

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    Mmmn, a pint of Buckfast.:D I could do a half bottle in under 10 seconds back in the day, haven't had a snifter of it in years though. Might indulge in one soon.
     
  3. Greenback

    Greenback Emeritus Moderator

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    I haven't seen a bottle in ages, thought they'd stopped making it!;)
     
  4. CarterUSM

    CarterUSM Established Member

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    In Scotland?!?! You must be joking!!!! I think I read somewhere ages ago, about 70% of all sales were made in Scotland's central belt! :D
     
  5. Juniper Driver

    Juniper Driver Established Member

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    Couldn't this behaviour be taken as drunk and disorderly?

    I had a row with a copper on the 1997 Cambridge bike ride who said I was going to jump a red light although I had no intention of doing it even though loads of other people had.

    I realised though I was totally wrong to argue.Total waste of time (also).Never forgot the incident though,but in truth I did zoom up to that traffic light so it may have looked like I wasn't going to stop.
     
  6. Butts

    Butts Established Member

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    Is this quaffed inbetween checking tickets ? :lol:
     
  7. Flamingo

    Flamingo Established Member

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    Naw, during ;)
     
  8. jon0844

    jon0844 Veteran Member

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    If you had a pint for every time you encountered someone with an advance ticket on the wrong train...
     
  9. 142094

    142094 Established Member

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    ... you probably wouldn't be alive today.
     
  10. Flamingo

    Flamingo Established Member

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    Or in the job :-P
     
  11. 12CSVT

    12CSVT Established Member

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    A better course of action would be to ask for the officer's name and number, and making a formal complaint for slander.
     
  12. ralphchadkirk

    ralphchadkirk Established Member

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    Good luck with that.
     
  13. WelshBluebird

    WelshBluebird Established Member

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    You see, I totally disagree with you.
    IMO you were right to argue. You had done nothing wrong.
    You are innocent unless it can be proven otherwise.
    So if you did not jump the red light, then they have no right to stop and talk to you.
     
  14. Greenback

    Greenback Emeritus Moderator

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    I don't agree. I see nothing wrong with a law enforcement officer who suspects that a person may break the law stepping in to have a word and tell them not to.

    I think that it is far better to try and stop someone from doing something that may be silly rather than look on, let them do it and then punish them afterwards.
     
  15. scotsman

    scotsman Established Member

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    I work in a bar in Scotland (this is important, in terms of law).

    You must have entered around 11pm, the closing time. You were, illegally, sold a pint, as last orders are 15 minutes before closing time (10.45pm).

    There are then 15 minutes "drinking up" time from last orders (11pm).

    Anyway, this is all pretty irrelevant. You refused to leave the pub when asked. That is an offence itself. The bar staff will be used to folk refusing to leave around closing time, they may well have not served you and not know what you were told and they will also be tired and wanting to get home!

    The fact is that if someone under the influence of alcohol refuses to comply with their instructions, they will not be afraid to get plod in to deal with it. You admit yourself that you "caused a fuss" - an indication that you were a) Intoxicated; and b) leaving.
     
  16. WelshBluebird

    WelshBluebird Established Member

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    And if the person assures the officer that they are not breaking the law, and the person does not look like they are breaking the law, then that should be that. There should be no need for a "row". Especially when it comes to something like jumping a red light on a bike. If the person has not jumped the red light, then there is no need at all for a "row". A quick word if you really must (I still disagree with that, but there you go) and the copper should then do nothing unless the law is broken. After all, as I said, innocent until proven otherwise.
     
  17. Greenback

    Greenback Emeritus Moderator

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    In the majority of cases, the only reason there will be a row (as in this case) is because the person being spoken to objects to it. I'm sure that there would be many complaints if, for example, the police had watched somebody staggering out of a pub towards their car and, rather than advise the person not to try to drive, they had waited for them to get in, start the car, drive off and knock someone over before arresting them.

    Prevention is better than cure.
     
  18. GB

    GB Established Member

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    That's exactly how the Police do it though and really it's the only way to secure a conviction for driving under the influence. I'd much rather they allow someone to drive a few yards and gaurentee a conviction then for them to issue a few words only for the person to do it again the next night and then kill someone.

    As for the cycling past a red light (or not), you have either done it or you haven't, therefore you have either broken the law or you havent. There is no law against thinks about doing it so there should be no bases for a police officer to pull you aside unless he has seen something else that might warrant a chat.
     
  19. Greenback

    Greenback Emeritus Moderator

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    Not around here it's not! Especially if it's someone on foot patrol...
     
  20. michael769

    michael769 Established Member

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    Indeed! The offence of being drunk in charge (not driving note!) of a motor vehicle exists for a reason. All then need to do is wait for the suspect to get in the driving seat with their car keys on them.

    How about their obligation to prevent a crime occurring? How would you feel if the police allowed someone they saw behaving suspiciously in your garden but decided to wait until they had smashed your door in and started trashing the interior before doing anything about it?
     
  21. jon0844

    jon0844 Veteran Member

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    Surely already being in a garden is reason to stop, unlike someone on the pavement looking at a house?

    Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk 2
     
  22. ralphchadkirk

    ralphchadkirk Established Member

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    Trespass is a civil offence. It'll only become burglary when they actually enter the building.
     
  23. Kneedown

    Kneedown Established Member

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    It's good practice for an officer to record all interactions with the public in their pocket books. Senior Officers regularly check their Constables pocket books and any sign of inactivity or gaps in time will prompt questions.
    Also it is an immediate record of the conversation that took place. When the notebook comes out it doesnt automatically mean you are in trouble, more that the Officer concerned is consciencious and following procedure by recording the details of all parties involved in the dispute.
    I cant comment on your demeanour or attitude at the time but on face value it does sound like you were on the defensive which will prompt further questioning.
     
  24. jon0844

    jon0844 Veteran Member

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    I realise that, but I can imagine a police officer attempting to ask questions if someone was standing around in a garden late at night.
     
  25. GB

    GB Established Member

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    That's at odds with the numerous police tv shows that are constantly on TV and the charge and punishment of drunk while in charge is less than that of driving while under the influence.


    The two are entirely different and you know it. As I said, there is no law against thinking about running a red so there is nothing for the police to question.

    Are you really saying that you would be ok with a police officer pulling you aside or knocking on your door claiming that, even tho you didn't, he believed you were going to run a red and start asking a whole load of questions?
     
  26. michael769

    michael769 Established Member

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    The offence of drunk driving and drunk in charge both come from the same section of the RTA and there is no distinction in seriousness as both carry pretty much the same penalties. There is no need for (and indeed it would be a breach of ACPO guidelines and the police constables duty to protect the public) the public to be put at risk by allowing someone who is drunk to actually drive off before intervening.

    Those TV shows do not give an accurate reflection of day to day policing, they just show the exciting bits, often carefully edited to make them more exciting.

    You miss my point entirely. The police have no way of knowing if that person standing in a garden is not the householder being there perfectly legitimately. All they can do is rely on their experience and gut instinct to tell them if something "feels" wrong, and to then investigate or advise so as to prevent a crime occurring

    As with all educated guesses they sometimes get it wrong, which is why our legal system requires evidence rather than the potentially flawed guesses and opinions of police officers in order to punish wrong doers.

    I see no difference between a PC concerned about what someone in a garden is up to, and one concerned that someone intends to contravene a red light, and in my view it is entirely appropriate for them to seek to investigate and where it seems fit to provide advice so as to reduce the risk of an offence being committed.

    The day we expect out police to go out with the sole purpose of catching people out is the day we become a police state.

    I would be more concerned on understanding what it was about my recent behavior that had causes the officer to become concerned that I may be about to commit an offence.

    I have been spoken to by the police on a couple of occasions and given advise, and was always grateful for the restraint and discretion, as well as being reassured that they were being diligent in seeking to protect the public (me!) from the consequences of allowing offences to occur.

    We should not be expecting (or allowing) the police to pick and choose which offences to treat with this level of diligence and which not.
     
  27. scotsman

    scotsman Established Member

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    I've re-read this and can't quite believe some of the posts. So here's my tuppence worth...again!

    It's up to 30 minutes where a meal is being taken, 15 minutes otherwise. However, dosxuk is correct in saying that it's at their discretion whether any is permitted.

    No it's not! You're getting mixed up - he hasn't "overstayed his welcome" he's refusing to leave! Generally getting the cops is a last resort too (draw your own conclusions)

    You were in the wrong! You were refusing to leave the premises after being instructed to leave. Simple.


    This. Methinks he probably ordered a bit before 11pm...

    Now, as for this post, I'm going to take it one bit at a time.

    Quite rightly? The fact two Polis had to remove you begs to differ, does it not?! You may feel that it's a right, but it's not. You refused to comply, and you faced the consequences. I think it might be your attitude - had you simply said "Sorry, the guy on the bar said I had 15 minutes - can I not have a minute to finish this, please?" you may well have been fine!


    Why does it matter so much that you shake either's hand? Or was it more the point of insulting the policewoman who did her job and asked what you were up to?

    Yes, that would be professional. Like I said, I think it has a lot to do with your attitude.[/QUOTE]
     
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