• Our booking engine at tickets.railforums.co.uk (powered by TrainSplit) helps support the running of the forum with every ticket purchase! Find out more and ask any questions/give us feedback in this thread!

Anglesey Central Railway

Status
Not open for further replies.

Bobdogs

On Moderation
Joined
19 Dec 2017
Messages
167
Location
Carmarthenshire
I have just returned from a holiday on Anglesey where I stayed in Llanerch y Medd formerly a station on the title line. The track is still there albeit totally overgrown.
The station yard has been turned into a community garden complete with a section of track on which stand a diesel shunter and an LMS guards van.
The station building has been extended and is now an excellent cafe.
The level crossing across the A5025 in Amlwch is totally overgrown both sides of the road.
Imagine my surprise when walking up the Dingle nature trail which is alongside the railway south of the now near derelict station ofLlangefni to find that the line has been cleared of all vegitation. For how far south, I don't know, it was hosing it down so turned back.
Does anyone know what is happening?
 
Sponsor Post - registered members do not see these adverts; click here to register, or click here to log in
R

RailUK Forums

Arglwydd Golau

Established Member
Joined
14 Apr 2011
Messages
1,422
There is a Facebook page 'Lein Amlwch of Anglesey Central Railway' which has all the latest developments....don't think I can do a link to that!
 

Arglwydd Golau

Established Member
Joined
14 Apr 2011
Messages
1,422
Sorry JB-B...you quoted my original post which I deleted as it requires a FB login as you realised!

I've copied the following:

The board of directors of Anglesey Central Railway Ltd. are pleased to announce, after 6 years of detailed discussions and lengthy negotiations with Network Rail Infrastructure Limited, we formally completed the legal due process on the 29 April 2021, and now are in a position to convey to you and state, Anglesey Central Railway Limited have a legally mandated and contracted lease for the rail corridor, designated The GLA Line north of Gaerwen, Anglesey, between Gaerwen Junction and Amlwch, for the period up to and including the 29 April 2120.

They have, it seems, undertaken a fair amount of vegetation clearance and on a video on their FB site, it looks pretty impressive!
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Vespa

Established Member
Joined
20 Dec 2019
Messages
1,592
Location
Merseyside
An interesting prospect, as a tourist attraction it could help to boost the development of tourism on the island, I for one love visiting the island with its Celtic heritage, ancient stone village, dolmen, abandoned copper works and would add this attraction to my repertoire during my future visits.
 

wobman

On Moderation
Joined
2 Jan 2011
Messages
1,233
The preservation group are doing an amazing job, I hope they get the line reopened then up and running
 

A0wen

On Moderation
Joined
19 Jan 2008
Messages
7,529
An interesting prospect, as a tourist attraction it could help to boost the development of tourism on the island, I for one love visiting the island with its Celtic heritage, ancient stone village, dolmen, abandoned copper works and would add this attraction to my repertoire during my future visits.

The problem is Amlwch isn't exactly a tourist destination, nor are the intermediate stops on the line.

Add in for a tourist line to be popular i.e. attract normal tourists, not rail enthusiasts, it really needs steam and there are a finite number of available steam locos.

North Wales is already well served with heritage railways, I'm far from convinced another will be viable.
 

Vespa

Established Member
Joined
20 Dec 2019
Messages
1,592
Location
Merseyside
The problem is Amlwch isn't exactly a tourist destination, nor are the intermediate stops on the line.

Add in for a tourist line to be popular i.e. attract normal tourists, not rail enthusiasts, it really needs steam and there are a finite number of available steam locos.

North Wales is already well served with heritage railways, I'm far from convinced another will be viable.
It needs to be marketed, there's a lot in Anglesey that outsiders don't know about, I had a friend who lived on the island and he showed me around, it is very much overlooked considering what it has to offer.

Llanddywn island
The Copper kingdom
Plans Newydd house
Beaumaris Castle
Din Lligwy iron age village
Llynnon Mill reconstructed iron age village roundhouses

Not to mention the countryside, they need to make much of it and shout it out tying it in with the railway scheme.
 

Brissle Girl

Established Member
Joined
17 Jul 2018
Messages
2,827
It needs to be marketed, there's a lot in Anglesey that outsiders don't know about, I had a friend who lived on the island and he showed me around, it is very much overlooked considering what it has to offer.

Llanddywn island
The Copper kingdom
Plans Newydd house
Beaumaris Castle
Din Lligwy iron age village
Llynnon Mill reconstructed iron age village roundhouses

Not to mention the countryside, they need to make much of it and shout it out tying it in with the railway scheme.
And you can add in red squirrels too.
 

A0wen

On Moderation
Joined
19 Jan 2008
Messages
7,529
It needs to be marketed, there's a lot in Anglesey that outsiders don't know about, I had a friend who lived on the island and he showed me around, it is very much overlooked considering what it has to offer.

Llanddywn island
The Copper kingdom
Plans Newydd house
Beaumaris Castle
Din Lligwy iron age village
Llynnon Mill reconstructed iron age village roundhouses

Not to mention the countryside, they need to make much of it and shout it out tying it in with the railway scheme.

Of those:

Llanddwyn Island - nowhere near the railway.
Plas Newydd House - nowhere near the railway.
Beaumaris Castle - nowhere near the railway.
Din Lligwy - nowhere near the railway.
Llynnon Mill - nowhere near the railway.

Another heritage railway, particularly a latecomer with a motley collection of rolling stock and industrial diesels won't attract the tourists.
 

Vespa

Established Member
Joined
20 Dec 2019
Messages
1,592
Location
Merseyside
Of those:

Llanddwyn Island - nowhere near the railway.
Plas Newydd House - nowhere near the railway.
Beaumaris Castle - nowhere near the railway.
Din Lligwy - nowhere near the railway.
Llynnon Mill - nowhere near the railway.

Another heritage railway, particularly a latecomer with a motley collection of rolling stock and industrial diesels won't attract the tourists.
At no point did I say it had to be near a railway, it's not going to be a public service in any shape or form, it's on an island full of tourist attracrions !
 

Brissle Girl

Established Member
Joined
17 Jul 2018
Messages
2,827
Of those:

Llanddwyn Island - nowhere near the railway.
Plas Newydd House - nowhere near the railway.
Beaumaris Castle - nowhere near the railway.
Din Lligwy - nowhere near the railway.
Llynnon Mill - nowhere near the railway.

Another heritage railway, particularly a latecomer with a motley collection of rolling stock and industrial diesels won't attract the tourists.
I don't think that fact that other tourist attractions aren't near the railway is relevant. It was meant to imply that there are already a lot of things to do on the island that make it a good place to go to, and the railway will add to that.

Having said that, I tend to agree with the second point. There are so many terrific railways (albeit narrow gauge) just the other side of the Menai Strait that there is a lot of competition within a short (daytrip) drive for the tourist £.
 

Cymroglan

Member
Joined
2 Jul 2011
Messages
140
Of those:

Llanddwyn Island - nowhere near the railway.
Plas Newydd House - nowhere near the railway.
Beaumaris Castle - nowhere near the railway.
Din Lligwy - nowhere near the railway.
Llynnon Mill - nowhere near the railway.

Another heritage railway, particularly a latecomer with a motley collection of rolling stock and industrial diesels won't attract the tourists.
Your definition of “nowhere near” interests me. They’re all on Ynys Mon which isn’t exactly vast!
 

A0wen

On Moderation
Joined
19 Jan 2008
Messages
7,529
Your definition of “nowhere near” interests me. They’re all on Ynys Mon which isn’t exactly vast!
Nowhere near means wouldn't be served by.

In the same way Ironbridge isn't served by the Severn Valley, but Corfe Castle is served by the Swanage Railway.
 

Bobdogs

On Moderation
Joined
19 Dec 2017
Messages
167
Location
Carmarthenshire
The problem is Amlwch isn't exactly a tourist destination, nor are the intermediate stops on the line.

Add in for a tourist line to be popular i.e. attract normal tourists, not rail enthusiasts, it really needs steam and there are a finite number of available steam locos.

North Wales is already well served with heritage railways, I'm far from convinced another will be viable.
Have they got a Middle East sponsor? If it could be achieved I would be one of the first to ride the line, but, how much is it going to cost for restoring 18 miles of track plus stations, signalling and other infrastructure.
Not to mention locomotives and rolling stock?.
 

A0wen

On Moderation
Joined
19 Jan 2008
Messages
7,529
Have they got a Middle East sponsor? If it could be achieved I would be one of the first to ride the line, but, how much is it going to cost for restoring 18 miles of track plus stations, signalling and other infrastructure.
Not to mention locomotives and rolling stock?.

Well, the West Somerset Railway's accounts for 2017 reckon non-staff operating costs were £2.5m........

Whilst I'm sure it can be done for less, I'd be surprised if a line of this length had change from £1m p.a.in running costs.
 

paul1609

Established Member
Joined
28 Jan 2006
Messages
7,300
Location
Wittersham Kent
Have they got a Middle East sponsor? If it could be achieved I would be one of the first to ride the line, but, how much is it going to cost for restoring 18 miles of track plus stations, signalling and other infrastructure.
Not to mention locomotives and rolling stock?.
When did trains last run on the track?
 

Llanigraham

On Moderation
Joined
23 Mar 2013
Messages
6,105
Location
Powys
Perhaps they are hoping that all the disgruntled members of the Llangollen will move over the Menai Straights.
 

paul1609

Established Member
Joined
28 Jan 2006
Messages
7,300
Location
Wittersham Kent
When we restored the Northiam to Bodiam section of the K &ESR in 2000 the costs came in at around £1million a mile this had the light railway order etc in place. I think if you were starting from scratch now with the requirement for a Transport and works order and barriered level crossings I think £4 million a mile would be a back of the fag packet cost. Ive no knowledge of the geography of the line and of what materials could be re-used. That figure includes the use of a lot of volunteer manpower which requires that you have people competent to carry out the work etc. etc.
 

krus_aragon

Established Member
Joined
10 Jun 2009
Messages
6,051
Location
North Wales
The Wikipedia page on the Anglesey Central Railway gives a reasonable summary of it's post-BR history, right up to the acquisition of a 99-year lease of the line back in April (though this last point needs a citation).

The HGV-based destruction of the bridge over Glanhwfa road on the outskirts of Llangefni back in 2018 will probably influence the direction the preservation society choose to build in.
 

Cowley

Forum Staff
Staff Member
Global Moderator
Joined
15 Apr 2016
Messages
15,889
Location
Devon
The Wikipedia page on the Anglesey Central Railway gives a reasonable summary of it's post-BR history, right up to the acquisition of a 99-year lease of the line back in April (though this last point needs a citation).

The HGV-based destruction of the bridge over Glanhwfa road on the outskirts of Llangefni back in 2018 will probably influence the direction the preservation society choose to build in.

Obviously you properly know the area Krus. Do you have any thoughts on the line being restored?
 

krus_aragon

Established Member
Joined
10 Jun 2009
Messages
6,051
Location
North Wales
Obviously you properly know the area Krus. Do you have any thoughts on the line being restored?
I do indeed know the line and the area. Efforts to get some services restored go all the way back to the 80s, and were almost achieved in the 90s (but the distraction of privatising the railways got in the way). The long delays, and the decay of the track(bed) in the meantime have made things much more expensive.

Let me start with an overview of the current state of affairs.

Much of Anglesey's workforce commutes off the island for work, which makes for heavy road traffic over the bridges, especially over the Britannia Bridge in the morning, as four lanes merge to one within half a mile. Plans for a third bridge to ease issues has just been put on the back burner due to a WG re-evaluation of all road-building schemes.

Not many people commute off the island by rail: the railway takes the easy route along the south of the island, but it's also avoiding population areas. Discounting Holyhead itself, only two of the other stops serve sizable population areas: Valley and Llanfairpwll. The others are effectively rural halts.

Neither Valley nor Llanfairpwll seem to be used as railheads. Their sparse service (1tp2h plus some extras) doesn't tempt people out of their cars, and most Anglesey residents who intend to make a long distance rail journey will make their way to Bangor instead - adding to road traffic on the bridges.

Now let's drift back to the Anglesey Central line. Llangefni is by far the largest population centre on the route: it is the civic centre of the island, largest town other than Holyhead, has a sizeable industrial estate on the south side of town (near the railway's approach to the town), as well as a FE/HE college that sees people commute from many areas of Anglesey and Gwynedd.

After Llangefni, the major population centres are Llanerchymedd and Amlwch, but they're significantly smaller (1,500 and 3,500 compared to Llangefni's 5000), and a lot further away from the mainline. They don't have employment centres on Llangefni's scale either, though Amlwch is trying to enhance it's tourism draw with it's history of copper mining, and Llanerchymedd station is, as mentioned, now doing nice service as a community café.

Rebuilding Gaerwen to Llangefni would mean rebuilding four miles of track, plus the junction work at Gaerwen. Llanerchymedd would be another seven miles for limited additional traffic, and Amlwch is another seven miles down the line.

Another significant expense would be the replacement of the destroyed bridge over Glanhwfa Road, just before Llangefni station.

My solution would be to reopen Gaerwen to Llangefni as a mainline branch, with a new station some distance south of Glanhwfa Road. (Ironically this is where Llangefni's initial temporary station was, before the bridge and subsequent cutting was finished.) I'd aim to site the station on the current line roughly opposite Lon Ceunant: just after the Glanbia Cheese factory (or whatever it's name is now), and just before the rugby club. This would be a short walk from the centre of town, but also very convenient for the industrial estate. Road access from the south to a significant car park could make Llangefni serve as a railhead for much of central and northern Anglesey, with a proper hourly service through to Bangor and beyond, calling at Llanfairpwll, and possibly another station near Pentr Berw. Probably not Gaerwen itself, though: the station is in Lower Gaerwen, whereas most of the houses are on the A5 in Upper Gaerwen.

You may notice that I've not said much about the heritage operation yet. The Lein Amlwch campaign team have worked hard to keep this line in the public and local government's mind for several decades. I do agree with the above concern about the significant heritage competition on the mainland: five narrow gauge , one standard gauge tourist railway, plus a tramway in northern Snowdonia alone, by my count. They do, however, have a well-established presence at Llanerchymedd, which could be a reasonable place to start the reconstruction of a heritage line, while limiting initial expenditure. I know several members of the group, and wish them the very best in their endeavour, but I would see more benefit in the mainline connection.

If they started building at Llanerchymedd, there would be the question of which way to construct the railway, though. North toward Amlwch, or south toward Llangefni? Amlwch's station buildings were demolished when the A5025 was widened for (original) Wylfa construction traffic, so a terminus there would be a clean slate. Llangefni's station is still owned by the council (and rented out as a dwelling), and the large station yard has been a public car park for many years - great for visitor access. The trouble would be the multitude of bridges through the Dingle / Nant y Pandy nature reserve just north of the station: they would need to be inspected and repaired before you could run a service to/from the station.

In summary, Llangefni's existing station would be a great eventual terminus for the Lein Amlwch heritage railway, but it'd be a very expensive place to start, what with all the bridges and cuttings nearby. Llanerchymedd and Amlwch would offer easier starting points, for a nascent railway. I'd take the demolished bridge in Llangefni to be a line of demarcation for the line, and advocate the Gaerwen-Llangefni portion be reconnected to the mainline, as this could be of more direct benefit to local residents as a whole, in giving a significant option to reduce car useage for travel to the mainland.
 

Cowley

Forum Staff
Staff Member
Global Moderator
Joined
15 Apr 2016
Messages
15,889
Location
Devon
I do indeed know the line and the area. Efforts to get some services restored go all the way back to the 80s, and were almost achieved in the 90s (but the distraction of privatising the railways got in the way). The long delays, and the decay of the track(bed) in the meantime have made things much more expensive.

Let me start with an overview of the current state of affairs.

Much of Anglesey's workforce commutes off the island for work, which makes for heavy road traffic over the bridges, especially over the Britannia Bridge in the morning, as four lanes merge to one within half a mile. Plans for a third bridge to ease issues has just been put on the back burner due to a WG re-evaluation of all road-building schemes.

Not many people commute off the island by rail: the railway takes the easy route along the south of the island, but it's also avoiding population areas. Discounting Holyhead itself, only two of the other stops serve sizable population areas: Valley and Llanfairpwll. The others are effectively rural halts.

Neither Valley nor Llanfairpwll seem to be used as railheads. Their sparse service (1tp2h plus some extras) doesn't tempt people out of their cars, and most Anglesey residents who intend to make a long distance rail journey will make their way to Bangor instead - adding to road traffic on the bridges.

Now let's drift back to the Anglesey Central line. Llangefni is by far the largest population centre on the route: it is the civic centre of the island, largest town other than Holyhead, has a sizeable industrial estate on the south side of town (near the railway's approach to the town), as well as a FE/HE college that sees people commute from many areas of Anglesey and Gwynedd.

After Llangefni, the major population centres are Llanerchymedd and Amlwch, but they're significantly smaller (1,500 and 3,500 compared to Llangefni's 5000), and a lot further away from the mainline. They don't have employment centres on Llangefni's scale either, though Amlwch is trying to enhance it's tourism draw with it's history of copper mining, and Llanerchymedd station is, as mentioned, now doing nice service as a community café.

Rebuilding Gaerwen to Llangefni would mean rebuilding four miles of track, plus the junction work at Gaerwen. Llanerchymedd would be another seven miles for limited additional traffic, and Amlwch is another seven miles down the line.

Another significant expense would be the replacement of the destroyed bridge over Glanhwfa Road, just before Llangefni station.

My solution would be to reopen Gaerwen to Llangefni as a mainline branch, with a new station some distance south of Glanhwfa Road. (Ironically this is where Llangefni's initial temporary station was, before the bridge and subsequent cutting was finished.) I'd aim to site the station on the current line roughly opposite Lon Ceunant: just after the Glanbia Cheese factory (or whatever it's name is now), and just before the rugby club. This would be a short walk from the centre of town, but also very convenient for the industrial estate. Road access from the south to a significant car park could make Llangefni serve as a railhead for much of central and northern Anglesey, with a proper hourly service through to Bangor and beyond, calling at Llanfairpwll, and possibly another station near Pentr Berw. Probably not Gaerwen itself, though: the station is in Lower Gaerwen, whereas most of the houses are on the A5 in Upper Gaerwen.

You may notice that I've not said much about the heritage operation yet. The Lein Amlwch campaign team have worked hard to keep this line in the public and local government's mind for several decades. I do agree with the above concern about the significant heritage competition on the mainland: five narrow gauge , one standard gauge tourist railway, plus a tramway in northern Snowdonia alone, by my count. They do, however, have a well-established presence at Llanerchymedd, which could be a reasonable place to start the reconstruction of a heritage line, while limiting initial expenditure. I know several members of the group, and wish them the very best in their endeavour, but I would see more benefit in the mainline connection.

If they started building at Llanerchymedd, there would be the question of which way to construct the railway, though. North toward Amlwch, or south toward Llangefni? Amlwch's station buildings were demolished when the A5025 was widened for (original) Wylfa construction traffic, so a terminus there would be a clean slate. Llangefni's station is still owned by the council (and rented out as a dwelling), and the large station yard has been a public car park for many years - great for visitor access. The trouble would be the multitude of bridges through the Dingle / Nant y Pandy nature reserve just north of the station: they would need to be inspected and repaired before you could run a service to/from the station.

In summary, Llangefni's existing station would be a great eventual terminus for the Lein Amlwch heritage railway, but it'd be a very expensive place to start, what with all the bridges and cuttings nearby. Llanerchymedd and Amlwch would offer easier starting points, for a nascent railway. I'd take the demolished bridge in Llangefni to be a line of demarcation for the line, and advocate the Gaerwen-Llangefni portion be reconnected to the mainline, as this could be of more direct benefit to local residents as a whole, in giving a significant option to reduce car useage for travel to the mainland.

Thank you very much for your very detailed reply. :)
I think it might be time to get the maps out later and have a proper study of things. It’s been a long time since I’ve been up that way (I used to have an aunt that lived in Benllech), but it’s always been an area that I’ve had a bit of soft spot for.
 

krus_aragon

Established Member
Joined
10 Jun 2009
Messages
6,051
Location
North Wales
Thank you very much for your very detailed reply. :)
I think it might be time to get the maps out later and have a proper study of things. It’s been a long time since I’ve been up that way (I used to have an aunt that lived in Benllech), but it’s always been an area that I’ve had a bit of soft spot for.
More than happy to oblige: I'm liable to start rabbiting on whenever anyone asks me about the line and its history. :)
 

paul1609

Established Member
Joined
28 Jan 2006
Messages
7,300
Location
Wittersham Kent
I do indeed know the line and the area. Efforts to get some services restored go all the way back to the 80s, and were almost achieved in the 90s (but the distraction of privatising the railways got in the way). The long delays, and the decay of the track(bed) in the meantime have made things much more expensive.

Let me start with an overview of the current state of affairs.

Much of Anglesey's workforce commutes off the island for work, which makes for heavy road traffic over the bridges, especially over the Britannia Bridge in the morning, as four lanes merge to one within half a mile. Plans for a third bridge to ease issues has just been put on the back burner due to a WG re-evaluation of all road-building schemes.

Not many people commute off the island by rail: the railway takes the easy route along the south of the island, but it's also avoiding population areas. Discounting Holyhead itself, only two of the other stops serve sizable population areas: Valley and Llanfairpwll. The others are effectively rural halts.

Neither Valley nor Llanfairpwll seem to be used as railheads. Their sparse service (1tp2h plus some extras) doesn't tempt people out of their cars, and most Anglesey residents who intend to make a long distance rail journey will make their way to Bangor instead - adding to road traffic on the bridges.

Now let's drift back to the Anglesey Central line. Llangefni is by far the largest population centre on the route: it is the civic centre of the island, largest town other than Holyhead, has a sizeable industrial estate on the south side of town (near the railway's approach to the town), as well as a FE/HE college that sees people commute from many areas of Anglesey and Gwynedd.

After Llangefni, the major population centres are Llanerchymedd and Amlwch, but they're significantly smaller (1,500 and 3,500 compared to Llangefni's 5000), and a lot further away from the mainline. They don't have employment centres on Llangefni's scale either, though Amlwch is trying to enhance it's tourism draw with it's history of copper mining, and Llanerchymedd station is, as mentioned, now doing nice service as a community café.

Rebuilding Gaerwen to Llangefni would mean rebuilding four miles of track, plus the junction work at Gaerwen. Llanerchymedd would be another seven miles for limited additional traffic, and Amlwch is another seven miles down the line.

Another significant expense would be the replacement of the destroyed bridge over Glanhwfa Road, just before Llangefni station.

My solution would be to reopen Gaerwen to Llangefni as a mainline branch, with a new station some distance south of Glanhwfa Road. (Ironically this is where Llangefni's initial temporary station was, before the bridge and subsequent cutting was finished.) I'd aim to site the station on the current line roughly opposite Lon Ceunant: just after the Glanbia Cheese factory (or whatever it's name is now), and just before the rugby club. This would be a short walk from the centre of town, but also very convenient for the industrial estate. Road access from the south to a significant car park could make Llangefni serve as a railhead for much of central and northern Anglesey, with a proper hourly service through to Bangor and beyond, calling at Llanfairpwll, and possibly another station near Pentr Berw. Probably not Gaerwen itself, though: the station is in Lower Gaerwen, whereas most of the houses are on the A5 in Upper Gaerwen.

You may notice that I've not said much about the heritage operation yet. The Lein Amlwch campaign team have worked hard to keep this line in the public and local government's mind for several decades. I do agree with the above concern about the significant heritage competition on the mainland: five narrow gauge , one standard gauge tourist railway, plus a tramway in northern Snowdonia alone, by my count. They do, however, have a well-established presence at Llanerchymedd, which could be a reasonable place to start the reconstruction of a heritage line, while limiting initial expenditure. I know several members of the group, and wish them the very best in their endeavour, but I would see more benefit in the mainline connection.

If they started building at Llanerchymedd, there would be the question of which way to construct the railway, though. North toward Amlwch, or south toward Llangefni? Amlwch's station buildings were demolished when the A5025 was widened for (original) Wylfa construction traffic, so a terminus there would be a clean slate. Llangefni's station is still owned by the council (and rented out as a dwelling), and the large station yard has been a public car park for many years - great for visitor access. The trouble would be the multitude of bridges through the Dingle / Nant y Pandy nature reserve just north of the station: they would need to be inspected and repaired before you could run a service to/from the station.

In summary, Llangefni's existing station would be a great eventual terminus for the Lein Amlwch heritage railway, but it'd be a very expensive place to start, what with all the bridges and cuttings nearby. Llanerchymedd and Amlwch would offer easier starting points, for a nascent railway. I'd take the demolished bridge in Llangefni to be a line of demarcation for the line, and advocate the Gaerwen-Llangefni portion be reconnected to the mainline, as this could be of more direct benefit to local residents as a whole, in giving a significant option to reduce car useage for travel to the mainland.
Thanks for the insight, It would be interesting to know what proportion of Holyheads 226,000 entries/exits in 2019 were ferry traffic and what was local. However at that sort of level despite heavily subsidised services to both Cardiff and London the existing Anglesey Railway must be in the basket case category, talk of adding even a 4 mile branchline to a community with a population of 5k is unrealistic imho.
 

krus_aragon

Established Member
Joined
10 Jun 2009
Messages
6,051
Location
North Wales
the existing Anglesey Railway must be in the basket case category, talk of adding even a 4 mile branchline to a community with a population of 5k is unrealistic imho.
This is part of why I think a railhead and bridge traffic reduction role is an essential part of any case for reopening.
 

Tomos y Tanc

Member
Joined
1 Jul 2019
Messages
648
The Wikipedia page on the Anglesey Central Railway gives a reasonable summary of it's post-BR history, right up to the acquisition of a 99-year lease of the line back in April (though this last point needs a citation).

The HGV-based destruction of the bridge over Glanhwfa road on the outskirts of Llangefni back in 2018 will probably influence the direction the preservation society choose to build in.
I tohough that the intention was that Llangefni-Amlwch would be operated as preserved railway while Llangefni > Gaerwen > Bangor would be TfW territory.
 

wobman

On Moderation
Joined
2 Jan 2011
Messages
1,233
I see on the FB page about the line how much clearance work has been done now, it would be great for the island to get the line up and running in some way in the near future. I heard amwlch is a deep sea port that cruise liners could lay anchor at is this true ?
Octel must have had some big ships moored there in the past & if cruise ships could get the tourists on the island then on a heritage steam train to gerwen then onwards to other n Wales stations the boost for the economy would be great

It's just an idea
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Top