Applied Physics question

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Madge Wildfire, 11 Nov 2011.

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  1. Madge Wildfire

    Madge Wildfire Member

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    The lamp in my fish tank (or aquarium if you want to be posh) is one of those fluorescent tube things, and is nearing the end of its days.

    If I lift the tank lid and look at it, it is flickering at such a rate I cant look at it for more than a couple of seconds without feeling rather unwell.

    However, if I look at the light projected into the tank through the water, there appears no be no flicker whatsoever.

    Is this the result of some clever physics, or have I been on the sauce too much?
     
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  3. John Webb

    John Webb Established Member

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    It it possible that when you lift the lid you disturb a loose connection which allows the lamp to flicker?
    Otherwise I don't know!
     
  4. Crossover

    Crossover Established Member

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    If looking at it through the water could it be that this slows down the transmission of light and therefore seems to stop the flickering.

    Also, you may not be looking at it as close up through the tank too.

    Couldn't say for certain though
     
  5. Eagle

    Eagle Established Member

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    Slows it down from 300,000 km/s to 225,000 km/s :P
     
  6. Madge Wildfire

    Madge Wildfire Member

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    You could be onto something there Sellis, maybe the denser water molecules are refracting the light in all different directions and the interference between that gives the illusion of being steady because it is just increasing the frequency of the flickers to a point that the eye cannot resolve. :shock:
     
  7. SS4

    SS4 Established Member

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    Refraction doesn't affect frequency. You still have the same number of photons being emitted, just their speed and wavelength change

    I'm not sure to be honest, I'd imagine that the water is somehow refracting it away and converting the photons to transfer to the water molecules (I'm in a particle mood today <D)
    --- old post above --- --- new post below ---
    Absorped is the word I was looking for! wiki
     
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