Arriva Trains Wales or Trenau Arriva Cymru?

Status
Not open for further replies.

6Gman

Established Member
Joined
1 May 2012
Messages
6,295
Sitting on a recently refurbished 158 (841 I think) I noticed an oddity.

There is a (new?) yellow sticker dealing with anti-social behaviour. The Welsh language version refers to the company as 'TAC' (i.e. Trenau Arriva Cymru). The English Language version refers to the company as 'Trenau Arriva Cymru' !!

Presumably Arriva Trains Wales is still the official name? Or has there been a change of policy? Or is someone at Machynlleth having a bit of fun?

Incidentally, the Welsh version includes the word :

gwrthcymdeithasol

Which might possibly be the longest word I've ever seen on an in-coach notice! 15 or 17 letters, depending on whether you're using Welsh or English orthography!
 
Sponsor Post - registered members do not see these adverts; click here to register, or click here to log in
R

RailUK Forums

Eagle

Established Member
Joined
20 Feb 2011
Messages
7,106
Location
Leamingrad / Blanfrancisco
Which might possibly be the longest word I've ever seen on an in-coach notice! 15 or 17 letters, depending on whether you're using Welsh or English orthography!
Not that the English language doesn't have long words for nontechnical concepts; "overenthusiastically", "counterrevolutionaries", "institutionalization", "uncharacteristically", "counterproductiveness", "indistinguishability", "compartmentalization", "anthropomorphization", "counterdemonstrations", "incomprehensibleness" are all fairly normal words with 20 or more letters.
 

johnnychips

Established Member
Joined
19 Nov 2011
Messages
2,475
Location
Sheffield
Not that the English language doesn't have long words for nontechnical concepts; "overenthusiastically", "counterrevolutionaries", "institutionalization", "uncharacteristically", "counterproductiveness", "indistinguishability", "compartmentalization", "anthropomorphization", "counterdemonstrations", "incomprehensibleness" are all fairly normal words with 20 or more letters.
However, the only one you might have found on a train was 'compartmentalization' thirty years ago...or perhaps, 'We do not accept any responsibility for the incomprehensibleness of train announcements because of poor PA systems or regional accents.' :D
 

tirphil

Member
Joined
27 Jan 2011
Messages
275
Location
Wales
Sitting on a recently refurbished 158 (841 I think) I noticed an oddity.

There is a (new?) yellow sticker dealing with anti-social behaviour. The Welsh language version refers to the company as 'TAC' (i.e. Trenau Arriva Cymru). The English Language version refers to the company as 'Trenau Arriva Cymru' !!

Presumably Arriva Trains Wales is still the official name? Or has there been a change of policy? Or is someone at Machynlleth having a bit of fun?

Incidentally, the Welsh version includes the word :

gwrthcymdeithasol

Which might possibly be the longest word I've ever seen on an in-coach notice! 15 or 17 letters, depending on whether you're using Welsh or English orthography!
The placement of stickers is nothing to do with Mach! Thats all done at Crewe during the refurb.
 

IanXC

Emeritus Moderator
Joined
18 Dec 2009
Messages
5,811
However, the only one you might have found on a train was 'compartmentalization' thirty years ago...or perhaps, 'We do not accept any responsibility for the incomprehensibleness of train announcements because of poor PA systems or regional accents.' :D
/Pedant/ Surely 30 years ago, before any Americanisation of our language it would have been compartmentalisation, as of course it still should be! /pedant/
 

PHILIPE

Veteran Member
Joined
14 Nov 2011
Messages
11,940
Location
Caerphilly
Not that the English language doesn't have long words for nontechnical concepts; "overenthusiastically", "counterrevolutionaries", "institutionalization", "uncharacteristically", "counterproductiveness", "indistinguishability", "compartmentalization", "anthropomorphization", "counterdemonstrations", "incomprehensibleness" are all fairly normal words with 20 or more letters.
The Welsh language contains many words with 2 or more words joined together and which form different parts of the omplete word. You will often find sub=words staring with a different letter and these are known as mutations where in certain circumstances the leading letter/s are changed. As an example, coffi can become goffi. It would take me too long to run through the whole process.
 

Barn

Established Member
Joined
3 Sep 2008
Messages
1,434
/Pedant/ Surely 30 years ago, before any Americanisation of our language it would have been compartmentalisation, as of course it still should be! /pedant/
As Eagle has said, this is actually an urban myth. If anything, we have shifted far more towards -ise in the last 30 years! The Times only switched to -ise twenty years ago.

The original -ize forms are still widely used in the scientific and academic press.
 

Eagle

Established Member
Joined
20 Feb 2011
Messages
7,106
Location
Leamingrad / Blanfrancisco
As Eagle has said, this is actually an urban myth. If anything, we have shifted far more towards -ise in the last 30 years! The Times only switched to -ise twenty years ago.
Similarly, notice how everyone in Britain stopped saying "soccer" about 20 or 30 years ago once the sport started to become popular in the US. Previously we might have used it as an informal synonym, but now god forbid we use the same terminology as the Americans...
 

tbtc

Veteran Member
Joined
16 Dec 2008
Messages
16,152
Location
Yorkshire, Yorkshire, Yorkshire
Not that the English language doesn't have long words for nontechnical concepts; "overenthusiastically", "counterrevolutionaries", "institutionalization", "uncharacteristically", "counterproductiveness", "indistinguishability", "compartmentalization", "anthropomorphization", "counterdemonstrations", "incomprehensibleness" are all fairly normal words with 20 or more letters.
...and yet we laugh at the Germans for having long words (that are the combination of other words)...

Shame "bouncebackability" isn't long enough to make the grade
 

Eagle

Established Member
Joined
20 Feb 2011
Messages
7,106
Location
Leamingrad / Blanfrancisco
...and yet we laugh at the Germans for having long words (that are the combination of other words)...
English is unusual amongst the Germanic languages in being reluctant to join words together like that. Compare the English "life insurance company" to the German "Lebensversicherungsgesellschaft", Dutch "levensverzekeringsmaatschappij" or Danish "livsforsikringsselskab": same three words in the same order, but only English chooses to break it up with spaces.
 

jones_bangor

Member
Joined
11 Mar 2011
Messages
856
English is unusual amongst the Germanic languages in being reluctant to join words together like that. Compare the English "life insurance company" to the German "Lebensversicherungsgesellschaft", Dutch "levensverzekeringsmaatschappij" or Danish "livsforsikringsselskab": same three words in the same order, but only English chooses to break it up with spaces.
Gwrthcymdeithasol (more correctly gwrthgymdeithasol) is an exceptionally long word for Welsh.
 

IanXC

Emeritus Moderator
Joined
18 Dec 2009
Messages
5,811
Both -ise and -ize spellings are valid in British. The spellings with -ize are the originals, and are the forms used by the OED.
As Eagle has said, this is actually an urban myth. If anything, we have shifted far more towards -ise in the last 30 years! The Times only switched to -ise twenty years ago.

The original -ize forms are still widely used in the scientific and academic press.
Well thats me told! I knew it wasn't quite so clear cut as maybe I had made it sound but having read up theres a lot more variance than I expected. Bit of a Oxford versus Cambridge thing too.

Personally I'd always use -ise, British English is in danger and something like this could be the thin end of the wedge!
 

merlodlliw

Established Member
Joined
8 Mar 2009
Messages
5,852
Location
Wrexham/ Denbighshire /Flintshire triangle
The Welsh language contains many words with 2 or more words joined together and which form different parts of the omplete word. You will often find sub=words staring with a different letter and these are known as mutations where in certain circumstances the leading letter/s are changed. As an example, coffi can become goffi. It would take me too long to run through the whole process.
Indeed mutations, Wood/Coed/Goed.

Bob
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Top