Build a house get a free 20 year rail season ticket

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aformeruser

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Interesting fact on Granada Reports regarding Alderley Edge today. When the station was built there were not many houses for it to serve so the rail operator offered a 20 year rail season ticket to anyone who built a house in Alderley Edge (although it wasn't actually called Alderley Edge at the time.)
 
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142094

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Quite interesting that. I know that Metro in West Yorkshire are quite proactive when it comes to new housing developments, with many of the houses being given free Metrocards for a year, under developer contributions.
 

reb0118

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I heard that anyone having a house built at Dullatur (station now closed - but between Greenhill and Croy on the E&G) was entitled to a free lifetime season ticket. This only applied to the head of the household though - so the railway would receive potential revenue from other family members and servants. If true I doubt there are any holders still alive today.:D
 

WatcherZero

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Wouldnt be surprised if pre-WW2 they did the same in the London suburbs since the train companies were the ones building most of the suburban housing.
 

Ivo

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Something like this might actually encourage people to move out of densely populated urban areas into schemes similar to New Towns. If building a house was something I could afford to do after University - and I have looked into it - then I would certainly consider this option. Alternatively, if a sufficiently large number of people took part, it may even generate enough of a case for stations closed in eons past to be reopened.
 

trentside

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Wouldnt be surprised if pre-WW2 they did the same in the London suburbs since the train companies were the ones building most of the suburban housing.
I've just completed my dissertation on suburban development and the development of new towns. I read quite a lot of material on the development of London suburbs, and didn't find this mentioned - that doesn't mean it didn't happen though.

I did come across a quote from William Burt, the General Manager of the North Eastern Railway - who told the Royal Commission on the Housing of the Working Classes in 1885, that the "workmen's escape routes to the suburbs should be strictly limited" to avoid spoiling suburbia. Quite a surprising attitude, but certainly the development of working class suburbs were not initially driven by the railways. Those for the middle classes were a different story.
 

Xenophon PCDGS

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Interesting fact on Granada Reports regarding Alderley Edge today. When the station was built there were not many houses for it to serve so the rail operator offered a 20 year rail season ticket to anyone who built a house in Alderley Edge (although it wasn't actually called Alderley Edge at the time.)
The cost of a 20 year rail season ticket these days in the "magic triangle" of Prestbury, Alderley Edge and Wilmslow is minuscule when compared to the average market prices of even middle-range properties. (Speak to anyone at Jackson, Stops and Staff in Wilmslow for confirmation of this).

I do speak here from a resident's point of view in that "magic triangle"..... the best part... Prestbury, of course..:D
 

WatcherZero

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And of course Alderley Edge has just been found to be one of only three places outside London and the South East in the top 10 with the lowest levels of poverty and highest income.
 

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And of course Alderley Edge has just been found to be one of only three places outside London and the South East in the top 10 with the lowest levels of poverty and highest income.
Isn't Alderley Edge supposed to be crawling with footballers with their hopeless inflated egos salaries and the like though? Or is that just a myth?

I do speak here from a resident's point of view in that "magic triangle"..... the best part... Prestbury, of course..:D
Nothing like a bit of bias, eh Paul? :lol:
 

aformeruser

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Found a bit more on this:

The Manchester and Birmingham Railway Company built the line through Chorley (Cheshire), offering free season tickets for 20 years to Manchester businessmen who built houses with a rateable value of more than £50 within a mile of the station. This 'season ticket' was in the form of a small silver oval which could be worn on a watch chain.

The station was called Alderley Edge after the geographical feature nearby to avoid confusion with Chorley (Lancs) and the settlement finished up taking the name of the station. Similar to Nelson (Lancs) that was Marsden but there was already a Marsden station in Yorkshire.

I'm not sure how we finished up with two Adlingtons in the North West with stations considering what happened elsewhere.
--- old post above --- --- new post below ---
I do speak here from a resident's point of view in that "magic triangle"..... the best part... Prestbury, of course..:D
Even now that Wayne Rooney lives in Prestbury?

I remember the Vicar from Alderley Edge appearing on TV soon after David Beckham moved there describing of how it's been downgraded by A list footballers moving in.
 

ChiefPlanner

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I've just completed my dissertation on suburban development and the development of new towns. I read quite a lot of material on the development of London suburbs, and didn't find this mentioned - that doesn't mean it didn't happen though.

I did come across a quote from William Burt, the General Manager of the North Eastern Railway - who told the Royal Commission on the Housing of the Working Classes in 1885, that the "workmen's escape routes to the suburbs should be strictly limited" to avoid spoiling suburbia. Quite a surprising attitude, but certainly the development of working class suburbs were not initially driven by the railways. Those for the middle classes were a different story.


This point was made by the GM of the Great Eastern Railway in his evidence to the Commission on London Transport in 1904 , saying that the "workmans traffic" at 1d a mile - had quite spoiled the suburbs of Loughton and Walthamstow. (as well as the workmen spoing the carriages , smoking , stealing leather door straps etc)
 

trentside

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[/I]

This point was made by the GM of the Great Eastern Railway in his evidence to the Commission on London Transport in 1904 , saying that the "workmans traffic" at 1d a mile - had quite spoiled the suburbs of Loughton and Walthamstow. (as well as the workmen spoing the carriages , smoking , stealing leather door straps etc)
Thanks for the correction, luckily I didn't reference the point - as the book apparently attributed it to an incorrect date.
 

Xenophon PCDGS

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Even now that Wayne Rooney lives in Prestbury?....I remember the Vicar from Alderley Edge appearing on TV soon after David Beckham moved there describing of how it's been downgraded by A list footballers moving in.
Do not confuse all areas of Prestbury, even by its own affluent standards, as being the same. There are even "better" parts of Prestbury near to the border with Mottram St Andrew that someone of the limited intelligence of Wayne Rooney could not hope to appreciate....thankfully for our select band in this rural area. A six bedroom property of age and character with outbuildings is not really what appeals to those of his ilk, but these properties are certainly appreciated by those of a more refined manner..:D
--- old post above --- --- new post below ---
Found a bit more on this

The station was called Alderley Edge after the geographical feature nearby to avoid confusion with Chorley (Lancs) and the settlement finished up taking the name of the station.
Was it not the case that the the station was first named in 1842 as Alderley, then re-named in 1843 as Alderley and Chorley, before its final re-naming as Alderley Edge in 1876. Chorley is a district of the Alderley Edge area on the road to Mobberley.
 

aformeruser

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Was it not the case that the the station was first named in 1842 as Alderley, then re-named in 1843 as Alderley and Chorley, before its final re-naming as Alderley Edge in 1876.
I was summarising not giving all the details.

Chorley is a district of the Alderley Edge area on the road to Mobberley.
It's actually classed as a small civil parish and has under 400 residents living in it. There are signs indicating Chorley on the B road between Mobberley and Alderley Edge.

It sounds like before the railway that Alderley Edge was just an undeveloped part of the Chorley parish but due to the railway it grew, got it's own name and became it's own civil parish.
 
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