Caledonian Sleeper bans the use of Galaxy Note 7

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robbeech

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Wasn't sure where to it this or indeed whether I have been beaten to it.

Direct quote :

Due to recent safety issues, Caledonian Sleeper requests all guests with Samsung Galaxy Note 7 devices follow our updated advice while travelling with us.

Could all guests please ensure that all Samsung Galaxy Note 7 devices:

1) Are powered down and remain powered down for the length of your journey.

2) Are not charged through the USB ports in rooms or power sockets in Lounge Cars.


Please note that this request applies to ALL Samsung Galaxy Note 7 devices, including those that have been changed as a result of the manufacturer product recall. More details on this can be found in Samsung's most recent press statement.

Seems they're really taking it seriously and rightly so.
 
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alexl92

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...whilst on board the service, in light of the recent problems.

I can understand this move and it seems fairly justified to me but I was just wondering whether any TOC has ever made a similar move in the past or whether this is unprecedented?
 
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as the software and firmware updates and changed battery supplier haven't seemed to address the kerspoding devices ...
 

AlterEgo

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...whilst on board the service, in light of the recent problems.

I can understand this move and it seems fairly justified to me but I was just wondering whether any TOC has ever made a similar move in the past or whether this is unprecedented?

Never heard it on a TOC but I have heard it on Iberia and LATAM airlines recently.

The manufacturer's advice as of yesterday was to power it down and not turn it on again anyway.
 

trainmania100

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It has been in the news quite a lot these exploding devices. I feel it is right that they rescrtict the use, for the safety of the passengers and staff.
 

robbeech

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I accept this was a somewhat lighthearted comment but with a valid point. I guess the lighthearted and valid response is that you are required to show your ticket before you board the service (maybe different if joining at an intermediate station).
 

Clip

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Transfer it to another device would be the simplest answer. Not sure if the sleeper has an app but if it does then yoru tickets will(or should) be abel to be read even if on a different device
 

gimmea50anyday

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The same issues with battery recalls and charger fires is delaying the replacement of avantix with the star mobile system which uses samsung galaxy mobile phones at the heart of the system. TPE were supposed to be introducing the devices now but has been delayed until after the new year
 

theironroad

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Does the Caledonia sleeper have e tickets and what if your e ticket is on a Note 7?

Well the ticket and berth reservation is usually checked by the host while you are standing on the platform before boarding the train. I've never been asked for it again when on board.

I suppose the only other situation would be if the lounge car was so full it was restricted to 1st ticket holders only, but the host could cross check your name and berth number with their manifest to conform you were a 1st ticket holder, but this scenario would need all the stars to align and world peace to come first.
 

47271

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CS have had this in place since Note 7 problems emerged first.

The compartment USB charging points replacing the old shaver sockets on CS carry a warning not to charge *any* device while it's placed on bedding. The particular risk in the case of the sleeper is people leaving overheating - or heaven forbid burning or exploding items - unattended on duvets when they go to the lounge or are asleep. Note 7 I suppose does (or did, as of today) no more than dramatically escalate that existing risk.
 

bignosemac

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Phone has been discontinued anyway.

And I think it's a safe bet that the 'Note' name will be retired too. Samsung's next phablet (if they build one) almost certainly won't be called the 'Galaxy Note 8'. Chances are we might not see the word 'Galaxy' again either, beyond current production models.
 

mbreckers

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ok hypothetical question here.

With this statement from Cal Sleeper regarding Note 7's, lets say someone did charge/use their Note 7 and start a fire, could the user be held liable for damage to the carriage/injuries etc.?
 

GlosRail

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The phone was never sold in the UK, so it should only be a small number of tourists that would have one.
 

route:oxford

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ok hypothetical question here.

With this statement from Cal Sleeper regarding Note 7's, lets say someone did charge/use their Note 7 and start a fire, could the user be held liable for damage to the carriage/injuries etc.?

I doubt it.

As long as no-one was injured, the ROSCO would probably be doing a wee jig of delight at getting full payment from their insurers for a vehicle that will be heading to the scrappies soon anyway.
 
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The phone was never sold in the UK, so it should only be a small number of tourists that would have one.

The Note 7 has been sold in the UK -

i'm currently working for a well known electricals retail group in the UK and some devices were sent out to store / customers before the first international recall ( and were subsequently returned ) and a good number of replacement devices with the revised firmware and different batteries went out to exchange for the original devices and to fulfill back orders ... different UPC on the products although most of second group were re-worked ( by Samsung) original stock rather than spanking brand new devices .
 

jon0844

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The phone was never sold in the UK, so it should only be a small number of tourists that would have one.

Yes it was, by a few networks, Carphone Warehouse, and SIM-free.

Ironically, given the sales of the Note previously it probably shouldn't have been.

A year ago, Samsung decided to skip releasing the Note 5 and came up with the Galaxy S6 edge+ to satisfy markets where Note sales were poor.

S-Pen usage is minimal even in markets where it does sell well. I think people just preferred the larger display mostly, and on the Note 7 the HDR display was (is) excellent.

Anyway, this year the S7 edge was effectively the same as the S6 edge+ so some bright spark within the company probably thought that it might be worth a punt.

Samsung even said they did it because of a campaign to get the Note released here again. A petition with very few signatures, but it was a PR win.

And so we got the Note 7 here, and I am sure sales were pretty poor. The problem now is that the issue is now a UK/Europe one, whereas had it happened only in selected foreign markets, it may not have damaged the brand as much.

And I think it's a safe bet that the 'Note' name will be retired too. Samsung's next phablet (if they build one) almost certainly won't be called the 'Galaxy Note 8'. Chances are we might not see the word 'Galaxy' again either, beyond current production models.

I'm not sure exactly what happened, but I am sure Samsung can redesign the phone quite quickly to give more space for the battery (solving the pinch point that can cause the fires) and re-release the phone, which in itself was a bloody good - if overpriced - phone.

My concern for Samsung, as Samsung will no doubt be aware, is what happens next year when the S8 family comes out.

The S7 and S7 edge are considered safe. No reported incidents, and most people are happy - the product is half way through its life cycle.

But the S8 will immediately have people wondering if that could have the same problems. Will it catch fire? It may well put people off.

I do hope it might give us a removable battery again though. LG managed a metal case with removable battery on the new V20, so it can be done.

ok hypothetical question here.

With this statement from Cal Sleeper regarding Note 7's, lets say someone did charge/use their Note 7 and start a fire, could the user be held liable for damage to the carriage/injuries etc.?

I know a few people who intend to keep their Note 7s. One or two are doing it because they imported the dual-SIM version from abroad and so can't send it back (most carriers will refuse to ship it, and Samsung are using special surface-only marked boxes with fire retardant materials inside).

Some believe that the problem is still pretty small in the grand scheme of things, or that by holding on to the phone they're somehow sitting on something that will be worth loads of money in the future as a rare item.

I would hope that Samsung will kill the devices through a firmware update over the air, and if people resisted that, Google could stop their services from running and networks would reject them from the network. Thus, hopefully people wouldn't endanger themselves or others because they think they know more than a company that just took a multi-billion dollar hit.
 

47271

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Funnily enough, one has blown up in an hotel on one of the more far flung sections of CS routes:

Samsung Galaxy Note 7 catches fire in Highlands hotel room

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-37624730

A replacement Samsung Galaxy Note 7 smartphone, deemed safe by the manufacturers, caught fire in a Highlands hotel room.

The phone, belonging to a Chinese guest, burst into flames as it was charging in the room at the Highlander Hotel in Newtonmore.

Samsung has now permanently ceased production of the device after a number of phones caught fire.

Hotel receptionist Gabriel Sebestin said this was the guest's second phone.

"They had been through the same experience before," he said.

"The company changed the phone for them and told them it wouldn't happen again but it did."
'Shocked and scared'

Mr Sebestin said he was alerted to the fire when the hotel fire alarm went off at about 22:00.

The guest was in his room with his wife and daughter, who was thought to be in her 20s.

"The room was full of smoke and they said there had been flames. The phone was very hot," Mr Sebestin said.

"They were shocked and quite scared and upset as the same thing had happened to them before."

The family were moved into another room for the night and left the next day. They kept the phone so they could send it back to Samsung.

The incident took place earlier in the week.

Owners of the model are expected to be able to return the phones for a refund or an exchange for a different Samsung phone.

Samsung said it was stopping sales of the device.

"We recently readjusted the production volume for thorough investigation and quality control, but putting consumer safety as top priority, we have reached a final decision to halt production of Galaxy Note 7s," the company said.

"For the benefit of consumers' safety, we stopped sales and exchanges of the Galaxy Note 7 and have consequently decided to stop production."

In September, Samsung recalled about 2.5 million phones after complaints of exploding batteries.

It later insisted that all replaced devices were safe.

However, that was followed by reports that those phones were catching fire too.
 

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Did the First ever ban Iphones with their charger problems a while back?
 

cjmillsnun

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Did the First ever ban Iphones with their charger problems a while back?

iPhone charger problems? As an iPhone user since 2009 i have never heard of any except in the US, and that was on the iPhone 3g, a phone not sold since 2010.

As far as battery issues with the iPhone, there have been not that many publicised in all that time.
 

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iPhone charger problems? As an iPhone user since 2009 i have never heard of any except in the US, and that was on the iPhone 3g, a phone not sold since 2010.

As far as battery issues with the iPhone, there have been not that many publicised in all that time.

Plenty out there clickyme
 

headshot119

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Plenty out there clickyme

None of which point at a problem anywhere near the scale of the Note 7.

A lot of the iPhone fires I've seen in the news have been caused by questionable quality third party chargers, rather than the phones themselves.
 

jon0844

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A charger shouldn't be able to damage the battery as there should be protection circuitry in the phone.

Sent from my HUAWEI MLA-L11 using Tapatalk
 
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