Chinese High Speed Train Trip - Beijing to Shenzhen

Discussion in 'International Transport' started by Cuthbert 80, 10 May 2015.

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  1. Cuthbert 80

    Cuthbert 80 Member

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    2 weeks ago I took the 10am G79 train from Beijing to Shenzhen. Now....I've taken many high speed trains from around the world including Shinkansen and TGV's but I must say that I have never seen anything quite like the Chinese bullet trains in terms of consistent speed and smoothness of ride quality. It was a slightly surreal experience.

    Basically, as soon as you accelerate from a station, you speed up to around 300 km/h (I was always at 307km/h) and the speed just stays there like its nothing. It generally does not slow down unless....you approach another station for a short stop. Of course the curves are very gentle to maintain high speeds as well as having very long straight sections but I'm guessing these trains are able to hold such an amazing average speed due to the lines being nowhere near full capacity in terms of frequency?

    I'm aware of the crazy amount of Shinkansen trains that are run each hour during peak times but even the TGV trains run a high number of trains per hour at peak hours too.

    What also struck me was the ride quality. I took the CRH380B and the ride was easily the most smoothest that I have ever experienced. Felt a lot more smooth than any Shinkansen that I've rode on. Is this mainly due to the ballastless track?

    I made a short video to highlight the sense of speed at mostly 307 km/h as well as the consistency of it:

    [youtube]WeS9l5IrjI8[/youtube]
     
    Last edited: 10 May 2015
  2. xjtyou

    xjtyou Member

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    I agree with you that the chinese bullet train is amazing!
    I love to travel by train in other countries whenever it is possible. Last month, we traveled in China by CRH bullet train(CRH2A) from Guilin to Congjiang among the Karst mountains. The maximum speed of that trip was only 247km/h, but it was the easiest way to travel in that rural mountainous area.
    In the past a few years, we traveled in China from Shenzhen to Guangzhou, Guangzhou to Xi'an,Beijing to Guangzhou,Xi'an to Beijing and Beijing to Shanghai all by bullet train. The longest train journey I took was the Beijing to Guangzhou one, 2300 km, 8 hours! Very reasonable price.
    The high speed train from Shanghai to Beijing is also very frequent, maybe 3-4 trains per hour.
     
    Last edited: 10 May 2015
  3. Cuthbert 80

    Cuthbert 80 Member

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    Wish I could have travelled to more places on the CRH bullet trains! It's just amazing how these trains can constantly maintain over 300 km/h for such long distances :o
     
  4. xjtyou

    xjtyou Member

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    Most HSR trains run in the daytime,7 am to 11pm,and are maitained at night. I saw a video made by a swedish guy on youtube, a coin can balance on the window sill on the chinese train at 300km/h. I think the high quality of track is the most important factor.
    https://youtu.be/yUtS8M90Fto
     
  5. notadriver

    notadriver Established Member

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    Is this one of the lines that has a max operating speed of 350 kph plus?
     
  6. xjtyou

    xjtyou Member

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    The design speed of that line is 350km/h. In 2010, I took the train from Guangzhou to Wuhan, and the maximum speed was 340km/h, but now the trains are running below 310km/h.
     
  7. Bald Rick

    Bald Rick Established Member

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    When Roger Ford used to do unofficial ride tests of new stock and write about them in Modern Railways, he always did a coin balance test. All the sprinters passed!
     
  8. 185

    185 Established Member

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    Been on a few D-trains over the last few weeks, pretty steady at 246kph for most of the way. The only stress in the journey is the ticket collection fiasco at the station each time... Wish they'd let non-prc citizens use the collection TVM machines. On a K-train next week, only for two hours just to experience the true horror of ancient Chinese Railways.
     
    Last edited: 18 Jun 2015
  9. TheKnightWho

    TheKnightWho Established Member

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    I found K trains absolutely fine. Basic, but certainly not a horror.
     
  10. kylemore

    kylemore Member

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    Dear dear what shocking pro-chinese/anti-western propaganda!

    I would rather believe our establishment's view that China's new infrastructure is shoddily constructed flim flam that keeps falling apart compared with our cutting edge, world beating technology.

    OK we might take the best part of 30 years to produce a 100 mile HSL but by golly it'll last for centuries!:D

    (Please, please note the smiley before replying!)
     
    Last edited: 19 Jun 2015
  11. 185

    185 Established Member

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    Lol... K train was horrific. 22 carriages long, with all passengers squeezed inexplicably into just four of them. My friend in the know reckons it was so they didn't have to clean them at the end of the night.

    No smoking signs up. Staff smoking! People with chicken in boxes, and I'm not talking about KFC either. You couldn't make it up. :o
     
  12. gordonthemoron

    gordonthemoron Established Member

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    we had chickens in crates in the passenger cabin of an aeroflot flight from Yerevan to Leningrad in 1985 ;)
     
  13. xjtyou

    xjtyou Member

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    4 of the 22 carriages are for passengers and what are the other 18 carriages for? From my experience, K trains have aircon, and yes there were some people smoking in the joints of two carriages, but never saw people smoke inside the carriage of K trains. I have never seen a passenger train with 22 carriages. 16 or 18 carriages is the longest one i took about 10 years ago.

    I have no idea nowadays how the K trains is. However, it was not horrific from my experience,maybe very crowded during holidays.
     
    Last edited: 4 Jul 2015
  14. TheKnightWho

    TheKnightWho Established Member

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    This was my experience too. The longest train I've taken was 20.
     
  15. Redonian

    Redonian Member

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    I wonder which K Train this was.
    I have travelled on 100's of Chinese trains, many of them K Trains. I too have never seen one longer than 20 coaches and that would include a baggage car and a crew car, possibly a generator car too.
    Smoking is permitted in the vestibules but , in my experience, the coach attendants are very firm with anyone who smokes in a coach. That said the train policemen are often to be found smoking in the restaurant car.
    Chickens in boxes or even in carrier bags is not unusual. On the last T Train I travelled on a guy got on with a dead sheep and left it in the vestibule.
     
  16. 185

    185 Established Member

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    Taizhou Jiangsu to Nanjing.... Last one of the night. Possibly a stock move.
     
  17. Redonian

    Redonian Member

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    I guess K8468.
    Unusually , for China, the trains between Taizhou and Nanjing have large amounts of availability even for tomorrow. The way the computer ticketing works I suspect they just fill it up from the front, which explains the empty coaches. I don't think this was a stock move.
     
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