Clayton CBD90 - Battery+diesel shunter

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Nottingham59

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birchesgreen

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Referencing the link in the Class 93 thread


To be known as Class 18, the manufacturer's batch of 15 90T hybrid battery/diesel-electric locomotives, the first of which is expected to run on rails as of this August via leasing company, Beacon Rail, will herald a new era for the manufacturer, and continue the story of its standard gauge Clayton Type 1 (Class 17) Bo-Bo diesel-electrics manufactured by the company between 1961 and 1965.

Not sure they'll be that keen to continue that particular story to be honest!
 

DustyBin

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Referencing the link in the Class 93 thread




Not sure they'll be that keen to continue that particular story to be honest!

You beat me to it there, I was just going to say the same thing!
 

coppercapped

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Referencing the link in the Class 93 thread




Not sure they'll be that keen to continue that particular story to be honest!

You beat me to it there, I was just going to say the same thing!
Clayton's reputation seems to have suffered more than it should have done. A more measured approach shows that there were errors made by both Paxman and BR in the early design and in the insistence of BR on the use of the aluminium crankcases. Some background from the Paxman history website https://www.paxmanhistory.org.uk/paxeng34.htm
The engines initially supplied to British Railways were of aluminium alloy construction. Cracking of the castings became a major problem and the engines were rebuilt by Paxman with cast-iron crankcases at great cost to the Company. John Cove, who worked for Paxman at the time, has told me that British Railways had previously tested the first pair of engines with aluminium crankcases before placing an order for a quantity. By that time Paxman had had some experiences with aluminium castings on the YHA and possibly also the YGA aircooled engine. Both types had experienced troubles with threads and failures in cast aluminium. John went on to say: "Consequently we suggested to BR that we supply the engines with cast iron crankcases from the start but BR were quite adamant that they wanted the engines to be exactly the same as the ones they had tested and which had given no trouble. We were so keen to get the order that we failed to stand up for what we believed was necessary and so supplied them in aluminium. But before long these engines in service had run longer hours than the test engines and troubles began to become apparent and we had to change all the crankcases to iron. The troubles then ceased but this would have been unnecessary if we had taken a stronger line before the order was placed."
 

GRALISTAIR

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A battery diesel hybrid shunter is a logical move. I look forward to photographing some of these babies if possible and accessible.
 

DustyBin

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Clayton's reputation seems to have suffered more than it should have done. A more measured approach shows that there were errors made by both Paxman and BR in the early design and in the insistence of BR on the use of the aluminium crankcases. Some background from the Paxman history website https://www.paxmanhistory.org.uk/paxeng34.htm

I've heard similar things before actually from people who were invloved wth the Class 17. Their opinion was that the locomotive should have been a success but was compromised by manufacturing decisions as opposed to inherently poor design. That's pretty much what the linked article says....

I wonder if they thought about putting the cab in the middle on the Class 18?!
 

JohnMcL7

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What are the three carriages the shunter moves past in the video?

Are there any other countries currently using battery powered shunters? The idea makes a lot of sense since there's a lot of advantages for them and fewer of the disadvantages.
 

pdeaves

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What are the three carriages the shunter moves past in the video?
The first one is a southern electric thing. Judging by the doors I would say a motor luggage van, possibly one of the battery powered 'tractor' things. The second and third are mark 2s (exact sub-types unknown to me).

Which heritage line is it?
 

Peddles88

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The first one is a southern electric thing. Judging by the doors I would say a motor luggage van, possibly one of the battery powered 'tractor' things. The second and third are mark 2s (exact sub-types unknown to me).

Which heritage line is it?
It looks like Wirksworth station on the Ecclesbourne Valley Railway.
 
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Nottingham59

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Which heritage line is it?
I know they have used the Ecclesbourne Valley Railway in the past, but I couldn't say if that is the case here.

(EDIT: There is Ravenstor station sign on the platform at ground level visible at 0:08.)
 
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Bob Price

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I saw one of these on a lorry in a lay by at j33 of the M4 some time back. Wondered what it was. Maybe a few Class 18's could replace some 08's. Certainly they would fit into the steel works in Cardiff.
 

DustyBin

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The first one is a southern electric thing. Judging by the doors I would say a motor luggage van, possibly one of the battery powered 'tractor' things. The second and third are mark 2s (exact sub-types unknown to me).

Which heritage line is it?

I think you mean a Class 419 (MLV) which it definitely isn’t.

I’d say it’s most likely a former Gatwick Express Class 489 (GLV).
 

Peter Sarf

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Referencing the link in the Class 93 thread




Not sure they'll be that keen to continue that particular story to be honest!
Yes, they did not last long in service. I think a lasting problem was something to do with fires caused by a hot exhaust near fuel lines. Maybe an old urban myth but was once told Carlisle depot had mastered their foibles with regular checking and changing of offending parts.

Shame as always seemed a good idea for remote shunting locations. But the demise of wagonload freight made the 17s and other type 1s surplus anyway. Witness 20s going round in pairs almost all the time by the mid-late 70s thus being a type 4 !.
The first one is a southern electric thing. Judging by the doors I would say a motor luggage van, possibly one of the battery powered 'tractor' things. The second and third are mark 2s (exact sub-types unknown to me).

Which heritage line is it?
My guess is part of one end of a Gatwick Express set. EDIT - confirmed by @birchesgreen. Driving (motor) was made from one end of a 2-HAP iirc.
 
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