Conductor Training - What to expect if successful.

Discussion in 'Railway Jobs & Careers' started by Northernboy67, 4 Jun 2015.

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  1. Northernboy67

    Northernboy67 Member

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    I am probably really jumping the gun here, as I have not even had an interview or got the job. I am just wondering what to expect, should I be successful. I have seen what to expect, if your going for a Train Driving role, but can find nothing under the Trainee Conductor role. I am just interested as I know that I would be better prepared. Is it Classroom based at first? Do you get your uniform before you start or during the first week?
     
  2. TDK

    TDK Established Member

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    You need to get through the sift first (the hardest part) all that happens is that you have a set program of training to do and a set time to do it in. The first week is generally induction that will familiarise you with the company and this is the week that you will be measured up for your uniform.
     
  3. redron

    redron Member

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    If you get a job as a conductor, after your initial induction you will spend a few weeks in a classroom gaining your PTS and learning rules, which you are assessed on as you go. After this you will do your commercial stuff [tickets].

    Once this is done you are released to your depot and will undertake their conductor training plan where you will learn the routes you are to sign and shadow conductor instructors. Finally you will be assessed on the whole thing.

    The process will usually last around 3-4 months.
     
    Last edited: 4 Jun 2015
  4. craigybagel

    craigybagel Established Member

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    You could probably get 20 different answers here as every TOC seems to do it differently! Most will have PTS at the start since you're not much use without it but after that it really all depends on where you are.

    For what its worth, it's 9 weeks officially in the classroom at ours (although they get you out and about on trains, stations (selling tickets) or even in the sim (practicing dispatch) as much as possible). Then back to our home depots to sit our rules exam, learn any additional traction that wasn't covered earlier, and route learning. Then 2 weeks shadowing another guard, then away you go :)
     
  5. Northernboy67

    Northernboy67 Member

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    Thank you for your help and comments. I have a better understanding. I have a bit of PTS knowledge, as I currently volunteer on The Kent & East Sussex Railway.
     
  6. tsr

    tsr Established Member

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    Don't worry about any heritage railway PTS. In fact, forget it whilst you're working under the banner of a mainline TOC. Mainline PTS training will almost certainly have significant additions/differences in content and certainly for validity. However, I only hold PTS certification for Network Rail infrastructure and not heritage lines, so I cannot say what the differences are for certain.

    If you concentrate, listen and ask questions about anything you're unsure of, I doubt you will find PTS training difficult, but it must be done properly.
     
    Last edited: 6 Jun 2015
  7. Jonfun

    Jonfun Member

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    It'll be useful to have an understanding of railway terminology as it can be a bit confusing at first, but there are likely to be differences in procedures and perhaps things like position of safety distances etc. As long as you're able to appreciate the differences and follow then then that's all part of the game.
     
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