Cooking facilities in drivers cabs? Really?

Discussion in 'Traction & Rolling Stock' started by Harlesden, 2 Nov 2011.

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  2. Pacerpilot

    Pacerpilot Member

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    66s still have a hotplate.
     
  3. MidnightFlyer

    MidnightFlyer Veteran Member

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    Hang on, I've got the wrong end of the stick here...
     
  4. MidnightFlyer

    MidnightFlyer Veteran Member

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    Are we asking do they have them in modern traction or old traction?

    Pretty poor OP...
     
  5. sprinterguy

    sprinterguy Established Member

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    Class 37s and 40s and their ilk did indeed used to have a small stove for the drivers' convenience, but to suggest that this somehow made the cab of these locos a better working environment (Draughty, primitive in design) than that of the modern, air conditioned, ergonomically designed cocoon of a Voyager/Meridian cab is quite frankly ludicrous.
     
  6. Mojo

    Mojo Administrator Staff Member Administrator

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    And of course drivers on modern MUs can have the Train Manager or Host bring them a cup of tea already made :smile:

    Obviously units without such facilities excepted, but examples given were Vomits/Mermaids/etc.
     
  7. Royston Vasey

    Royston Vasey Established Member

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    Erm, it is well known that there is or was an electric hotplate in at least one cab of many diesel locos for the heating of water/drinks. Hardly cooking but I've heard anecdotes that they could and were used for heating food as well. I understand even the class 66 does.
    --- old post above --- --- new post below ---
    Your reply to the OP was hardly Charles Dickens, and incorrect to boot.
     
  8. MidnightFlyer

    MidnightFlyer Veteran Member

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    But 221s don't have such facilities in the cab...
     
  9. table38

    table38 Established Member

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    Class 40s had a hotplate but it was in the engine compartment, and perhaps appropriately a toilet at the "No.2" end :)
     
  10. Royston Vasey

    Royston Vasey Established Member

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    Why delete your accurate post then? :lol:
     
  11. phil8715

    phil8715 Member

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    Class 47's certainly had them.

    Sent from my GT-P1010 using Tapatalk
     
  12. MidnightFlyer

    MidnightFlyer Veteran Member

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    Because I got the wrong end of the stick, I thought he meant do 221s etc have them, not is what is written underneath true?
     
  13. Wyvern

    Wyvern Established Member

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    In the past, freight trains would spend long periods waiting in goods loops.

    This happened less as wagons were able to travel at a higher speed and more able to fit in with passenger speeds. Most of the goods loops were removed. From custom and practice, locos stiill had stoves until the introduction of the 66s.
     
  14. district

    district Member

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    Another absolute gem from Yahoo Answers...

    Just like this!
     
  15. ChiefPlanner

    ChiefPlanner Established Member

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    08 shunters had a Belling type cooker pad - usually used as a heater
     
  16. Minilad

    Minilad Established Member

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    I can categorically state 220s and 221s have no in cab cooking / warming / heating facilities !!
    But the galley at the first class end does have a microwave !
     
  17. Old Timer

    Old Timer Established Member

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    As anyone will tell you, the Class 47 cooking rings were designed to rattle !
     
  18. Flywaver

    Flywaver Member

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    Lol Old Timer. So true! They were great for cab heat...
     
  19. Old Timer

    Old Timer Established Member

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    A photo of a crew enjoying the fruits of the cooker !

    The date : Aug 1979

    The location : Up Slow line at the south end of Ampthill Tunnel

    The job : OHL staff were installing the registration equipment in preparation to run the OHL inside the tunnel. The 08 has just arrived and collected the men and is about to set back into the tunnel.

    The red banner flags (on both lines) simply denoted the limit of the worksite. Not in the Rule Book at that time but the application of common sense at a time when there was no official marking of the limits of each work site. Worksite marker boards emerged from 1985 onwards following a number of accidents/incidents where trains had run into work sites and collided with other trains or equipment

    Flywaver
    You will remember how the cooker kettle/pot guards on 47s used to increase their vibration in proportion to the amount of power applied ? :lol: :lol:
     

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  20. IanXC

    IanXC Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    It would be great if that transpired to be the origin of that phrase!

     
  21. AlterEgo

    AlterEgo Veteran Member

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    Quite off topic I know, but the USAF C-130J Hercules aircraft have a microwave on the flight deck!

    They took great pleasure in showing it off when I visited the Hurricane Hunters in Mississippi a few years back.
     
  22. Waldgrun

    Waldgrun Member

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    Don't forget that all BR standard class steam engines had the capability for cooking and hot water.:p

























    Fry up on the shovel and Billy Can placed above the firebox door! (For those too young to remember!)
     
  23. Rugd1022

    Rugd1022 Member

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    During the Winter months I often use the hotplate on our 66s as a cab heater, it's much better than the hot air heaters as they tend to make you drousy. I still use the hotplate to boil water for my tea, using my old mash can, and they're handy for heating up tins of soup as well.

    On a ballast job you have more time to make a proper meal, if you can be bothered to carry all the kit that is.
     
  24. OuterDistant

    OuterDistant Member

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  25. pinkpanther

    pinkpanther Member

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    33012 has a hotplate (with obligatory kettle) just inside the engine room at one end.

    Although it probably doesn't get used very often at Swanage (too much tea floating around from other sources!), according to the 71A group news page it came in rather handy recently at the NYMR gala.
     
  26. Cherry_Picker

    Cherry_Picker Established Member

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    There is a hotplate in a mark 3 DVT. Dunno whether they still work or not, but they are there.
     
  27. Yew

    Yew Established Member

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    Most british tanks have a kettle (im guessing a hotplate and kettle, rather than an integrated unit)
     
  28. Hydro

    Hydro Established Member

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    A lot of military vehicles have what is known as a BV, or boiling vessel. Not quite a kettle/hotplate combo.
     
  29. 9K43

    9K43 Member

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    Class 40's were ice boxes on wheels, the doors fitted where they touched and the windows kept slipping down.
    They were full of expanding foam to stop the hurricane of cold air which blew in through every nook and cranny of these engines,
    As someone remarked, the stove was in the middle of the engine compartment.
    Before leaving HM, I placed a can of boiling water on such a stove to go class6 to Manchester.
    On arriving at the location after about 45 mins running, I went for my boiling can, but alas it was full of cold water by this time.
    The comedian who decided that the mashing ring was in the engine compartment, ought to spend the rest of his days riding about in such an engines gasping for a quick brew.
     
  30. sbt

    sbt Member

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    BV's, not just for making tea...

    Battered examples of the earlier model:

    http://www.fv432.co.uk/wwwfv432couk/ces/boilingvessel.htm

    Data Sheet for the current model, describing all the various stuff you can do with it:

    http://www.armedforces-int.com/article/fv706656-cookingboiling-vessel.html

    The US now has their own version, from the same UK manufacturer as ours.

    They are not just a luxury. Whilst I wouln't want to overstate things, on current ops they minimise stop time for food etc. in an environment where being on the move equals survival and hydration is vital.


    On the railways I imagine that a properly fed and watered railwayman is a more comfortable and alert, and therefore safer, railwayman.

    BVs for all cabs and vans? :)
     
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