Cornton level crossing

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matchmaker

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I've received a "Neighbour Notification". Work commences 30th April to convert the existing AHB crossing to full barriers with object detection. Works will continue to 31st May, with the B832 road closed from 30th April to 10th May.
 
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Freightmaster

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The work also involves commissioning a new pair of controlled signals to protect the crossing,
which will also have the effect of reducing the headway between Stirling and Bridge of Allen.





MARK
 

matchmaker

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The work also involves commissioning a new pair of controlled signals to protect the crossing,
which will also have the effect of reducing the headway between Stirling and Bridge of Allen.





MARK
Where will these be located? Currently the up line IB home (after the up platform at BOA) is under a mile from the crossing.
 

Freightmaster

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Where will these be located? Currently the up line IB home (after the up platform at BOA) is under a mile from the crossing.
The new up signal (SN48) will be immediately north of Cornton LC, 987 yards south of the existing DB15 that you refer to,
which becomes three aspect.

In addition, there is another new three aspect up signal (SN47) immediately south of Cornton footpath crossing,
with the existing SN47 at Stirling North being renumbered SN43 (current distant SN48 is abolished)

So after leaving/passing Bridge of Allen, a southbound train will encounter no less than four controlled signals
before arriving at Stirling from next Tuesday! o_O




MARK
 

matchmaker

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The new up signal (SN48) will be immediately north of Cornton LC, 987 yards south of the existing DB15 that you refer to,
which becomes three aspect.

In addition, there is another new three aspect up signal (SN47) immediately south of Cornton footpath crossing,
with the existing SN47 at Stirling North being renumbered SN43 (current distant SN48 is abolished)

So after leaving/passing Bridge of Allen, a southbound train will encounter no less than four controlled signals
before arriving at Stirling from next Tuesday! o_O




MARK
Interestingly, DB15 currently has (had - it might have been changed in the last few years) a 3 aspect head, but only with red and green operational - the yellow aspect is blanked off. It was originally installed in preparation for ROSS2 (Rationalisation Of Signals in Scotland Phase 2) which didn't go ahead. That was 20 odd years ago.
 

InOban

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Will it make a difference northbound? Allowing a fast train to be followed by a BOA stopper?
 

MadMac

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Interestingly, DB15 currently has (had - it might have been changed in the last few years) a 3 aspect head, but only with red and green operational - the yellow aspect is blanked off. It was originally installed in preparation for ROSS2 (Rationalisation Of Signals in Scotland Phase 2) which didn't go ahead. That was 20 odd years ago.
I think that went in like that when the IB sections were provided in conjunction with Cornton AHBs and Bridge of Allan station. That was around 1985!
 

waverley47

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The main benefit is to help make safer an incredibly busy level crossing (8tph at least plus freights, totalling up to a max of about 20 minutes in an hour) in the middle of a large urban area. While nowhere near as much of a liability as Lincoln level crossings for example, it's a big problem, and there has been a great desire to build a bridge to solve this permanently, but this is a definite good interim solution.

The main problem with the long sections is that given the busyness of the level crossing, currently any trains have to wait for the barriers to come down quite a way away, and this eats capacity. Additionally, given the number of trains over this section, any problems with the level crossing means that you end up with trains backed up in platforms at Bridge of Allan and Stirling.
 

Tomnick

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The main problem with the long sections is that given the busyness of the level crossing, currently any trains have to wait for the barriers to come down quite a way away, and this eats capacity.
It’s currently an AHB crossing, so why do trains have to wait for the barriers to come down?
 

mcmad

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The main benefit is to help make safer an incredibly busy level crossing (8tph at least plus freights, totalling up to a max of about 20 minutes in an hour) in the middle of a large urban area. While nowhere near as much of a liability as Lincoln level crossings for example, it's a big problem, and there has been a great desire to build a bridge to solve this permanently, but this is a definite good interim solution.

The main problem with the long sections is that given the busyness of the level crossing, currently any trains have to wait for the barriers to come down quite a way away, and this eats capacity. Additionally, given the number of trains over this section, any problems with the level crossing means that you end up with trains backed up in platforms at Bridge of Allan and Stirling.
The local NIMBY's knocked back the bridge proposal didn't they? Think this is as good as it will get.
 

waverley47

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It’s currently an AHB crossing, so why do trains have to wait for the barriers to come down?

The signalling sections mean that any problems on the crossing (reasonably unlikely but still very possible on a half barrier crossing) leave a good wait for any problems to be solved. Not admittedly on the same level as Wester Hailes, but still an annoying crossing to have on both a busy road and railway.

The local NIMBY's knocked back the bridge proposal didn't they? Think this is as good as it will get.

It would appear so, but I wouldn't be surprised if NR just bite the bullet and build it anyway in five years time.
 
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