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Could new electric resistant paint be of use for tunnels and bridges on more routes, such as the TransPennine routes?

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Geeves

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Over on the GWR electrification there is a link posted to a new concept of using electric resistant paint on overhead structures, this could be a potential game changer on the all the transpennine routes with the multiple tunnels and low clearance bridges. Lets hope there is some transfer of this new technology up here.

In a world first, electric resistant paint combined with voltage-controlled clearance (VCC) has helped make a Victorian railway bridge usable by new electric trains, avoiding weeks of passenger disruption and train delays in the process.


Just over a year ago, electrification of the railway running between London and Cardiff was completed, providing greener and faster journeys for our passengers.


But behind the scenes something innovative was happening, that turned out to be a huge success and will now be used to shape the future of electrification projects at Network Rail.


As diesel trains were replaced with electric ones, Network Rail engineers were tasked with a huge job to install overhead wires and cables to run them.


As most routes were designed during the Victorian times, this often means large structures, like bridges, need to be reconstructed before electrification is installed.
 
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Bald Rick

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Over on the GWR electrification there is a link posted to a new concept of using electric resistant paint on overhead structures, this could be a potential game changer on the all the transpennine routes with the multiple tunnels and low clearance bridges. Lets hope there is some transfer of this new technology up here.


This isn’t a solution for tunnels, but then tunnels aren’t often that much of s problem unless the have a particularly low crown, or are especially wet.

This is a solution for metal decked over bridges / pipe bridges.
 

Killingworth

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This isn’t a solution for tunnels, but then tunnels aren’t often that much of s problem unless the have a particularly low crown, or are especially wet.

This is a solution for metal decked over bridges / pipe bridges.
Some of the Pennine tunnels are very wet. Like the longest at Totley where work on drainage has been going on for over a year.
 

Hey 3

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Over on the GWR electrification there is a link posted to a new concept of using electric resistant paint on overhead structures, this could be a potential game changer on the all the transpennine routes with the multiple tunnels and low clearance bridges. Lets hope there is some transfer of this new technology up here.

It could be a solution for Standedge/Stalybridge/Mossley/Morley tunnels(Huddersfield Line/North Transpennine and Disley/Cowburn/Totley tunnels on the Hope Valley Line and South Transpennine) when they electrify those lines and avoids a Farnworth scenario.
 

edwin_m

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This isn’t a solution for tunnels, but then tunnels aren’t often that much of s problem unless the have a particularly low crown, or are especially wet.

This is a solution for metal decked over bridges / pipe bridges.

Some of the Pennine tunnels are very wet. Like the longest at Totley where work on drainage has been going on for over a year.

It could be a solution for Standedge/Stalybridge/Mossley/Morley tunnels(Huddersfield Line/North Transpennine and Disley/Cowburn/Totley tunnels on the Hope Valley Line and South Transpennine) when they electrify those lines and avoids a Farnworth scenario.
To emphasise what @Bald Rick has posted, this is a solution to the problem of metallic bridges being too close to the wires. The bridge structure is electrically connected to earth so there is a risk of flashover if the clearances are too tight. Combined with devices to minimise the risk of over-voltage in the wire, it allows the minimum clearance to be reduced.

It's not a solution to the problems of wet tunnels. Painting a wet tunnel with insulating paint won't make it any less wet.
 

Bald Rick

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Indeed. Tunnels are rarely an issue because of insufficient electrical clearance betweeen the tunnel wall and the contact / catenary wire. The issue with tunnels is the physical clearance to the pantograph in the top ‘corners’. Even then it’s not that common an issue. The solution is invariably to lower the track. Insulating paint is, frankly, irrelevant in these circumstances.
 

Philip

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With regards tunnel clearance, I used to think Shugborough tunnel had a third rail in it to allow trains to switch from the pantograph to the shoe, as there wasn't enough clearance for wires. The reason is I once, in 1997, saw trains that were going into western portal making a flash as they entered. I know this obviously isn't the case here with the traction that goes through it, but are there any such examples of tunnels on an OHLE line with a 3rd rail inside the tunnel?
 

plugwash

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Depending on how you count "on on OHLE line", there is the northern city line, which branches off from an OHLE electrified mainline and is OHLE electrified to drayton park, but then switches to third rail for the tunnels into moorgate.
 

edwin_m

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With regards tunnel clearance, I used to think Shugborough tunnel had a third rail in it to allow trains to switch from the pantograph to the shoe, as there wasn't enough clearance for wires. The reason is I once, in 1997, saw trains that were going into western portal making a flash as they entered. I know this obviously isn't the case here with the traction that goes through it, but are there any such examples of tunnels on an OHLE line with a 3rd rail inside the tunnel?
Probably the only one is the Northern City Line between Drayton Park and Moorgate. This section was built as twin single-track tunnels in the early 20th century just large enough to allow main line suburban trains to run through to the City, so larger than other Tube tunnels but not big enough for overhead line. For various reason this connection wasn't made until the 1970s, when Class 313 was built with dual-system capability specifically for this route.

As mentioned in previous posts, providing clearance for OLE is rarely difficult, and usually worthwhile to do so rather than have to run dual-system trains.
 
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