COVID 19 Good News Stories

Mag_seven

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This thread is to record and discuss good news stories in connection with the medical / health issues associated with COVID-19. It is not about any stories concerning things like lockdown lifting - more good news stories about the actual medical issues surrounding the virus.

I'll open the thread with this story from the BBC which is about T-Cells:
UK scientists are to begin testing a treatment that it is hoped could counter the effects of Covid-19 in the most seriously ill patients.

It has been found those with the most severe form of the disease have extremely low numbers of an immune cell called a T-cell.

 
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Yew

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This is a very exciting thread most "good news" I've found online has been inane trivialities.

How about this one? (Though I admit this particular source puts a negative spin on it. We might not get the Holy Grail vaccine the first time around, but if we can stop the pneumonia, suddenly this virus goes from a killer to a bit of a cold)

Moderna’s Vaccine
In its press release, the company reported that 45 study participants who received one or two doses of the vaccine developed a strong immune response to the virus. Researchers measured virus-recognizing antibodies in 25 participants, and detected levels similar to or higher than those found in the blood of people who have recovered from COVID-19.
Oxford Vaccine
a vaccine being developed at the University of Oxford, UK, that is also in human trials — protected six monkeys from pneumonia
 

Mag_seven

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The BBC reports another positive development in the treatment of COVID -19.

A drug treatment called remdesivir that appears to shorten recovery time for people with coronavirus is being made available on the NHS.

UK Health Secretary Matt Hancock said it was probably the biggest step forward in the treatment of coronavirus since the crisis began.
 

yorkie

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Although there is no doubt some people are more susceptible to more severe symptoms than others, there are people who are deemed high risk who have some good news stories to tell:
Bryony Hopkins said:
After eight days, my symptoms eased. My suppressed immune system had done a good job.

I am not alone in my story. There are many people, like me, considered high risk who have made a full recovery
Khadija from Leeds said:
"I was panicking at first when I got the symptoms. I knew my immune system wasn't up to scratch.

"All over the news is the death rate, there wasn't anything about people recovering and surviving. The way I saw it was as soon as you go into hospital with it, you're not going to be coming out alive."

Paramedics were sent to her house, but they decided Khadija didn't need to go to hospital. They suggested she call 111 to arrange a test, but none were available.

"I tried to keep a positive outlook even though I was scared," she says.

A few weeks on and Khadija has made a good recovery
 
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Silverlinky

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"The swabs that were performed over the last 10 days showed a viral load in quantitative terms that was absolutely infinitesimal compared to the ones carried out a month or two months ago," Dr Zangrillo told RAI television

Following the analysis of 200 patients and comparing the viral load present in samples taken with a swab, the virus has "enormously weakened", according to Massimo Clementi, director of the Microbiology and Virology Laboratory of San Raffaele.
The virus is burning itself out, people are still getting infected but the virus is now much weaker that it was.
 
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Mag_seven

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Are we gradually seeing some light at the end of the tunnel - I hope so.



The UK has recorded its lowest daily rise in the number of coronavirus deaths since before lockdown on 23 March, latest government figures show.

A further 55 people died after testing positive with the virus as of 17:00 BST on Sunday, taking the total to 40,597.

This included no new deaths announced in both Scotland and Northern Ireland for the second consecutive day.
 

adc82140

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Studies which tested samples of the population to find asymptomatic cases, and then traced their contacts, found far fewer secondary infections than in the contacts of people who'd had symptoms.

This led the WHO, in guidance on wearing masks published at the weekend, to conclude: "The available evidence from contact tracing reported by member states suggests that asymptomatically-infected individuals are much less likely to transmit the virus than those who develop symptoms"
Encouraging. Particularly if as some say many of us have been asymptomatic
 
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nlogax

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Surprised this hasn't already been mentioned, but let's look at what New Zealand's managed to achieve by effectively eliminating C-19 from the country.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/kaelic...-country-achieves-alert-level-1/#30329ad45beb

Congratulations to New Zealand, which, as of June 8, 2020, has effectively eliminated the threat of Covid-19 on its soil due to a series of strict lockdowns, strong government leadership and the ability of its residents to band together and follow the rules. As they say in this part of the world, good on ya!

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern announced that the country—after 17 days without any new cases of Covid-19 and 75 days of intense lockdowns and social distancing measures—would make the move to alert level 1 in a post-Cabinet meeting press conference on Monday, June 8, with all changes going into effect at midnight.
There's still the risk of a few cases here and there, not to mention those potentially coming from overseas - but it's a fantastic feat and a great moment for all those that live in NZ. I think most of us long for such a moment here.
 

nlogax

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Another good news story. The slow-down in brewing during the pandemic means that there's now a Marmite shortage. Happy days :lol:
 

brad465

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Sounds like great news which must be able to help reopen society and beat the pandemic:


A cheap and widely available drug called dexamethasone can help save the lives of patients who are seriously ill with coronavirus.

UK experts say the low-dose steroid treatment is a major breakthrough in the fight against the deadly virus.

It cut the risk of death by a third for patients on ventilators. For those on oxygen, it cut deaths by a fifth.
 

adc82140

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Absolutely. The study lead has called it a "major breakthrough" This is what the aim should be- stop deaths. The aim should not be to stop people getting the virus. As predicted The Guardian are not even reporting it.
 

MattA7

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Sounds like great news which must be able to help reopen society and beat the pandemic:

I can’t help but think that it’s is one of these false promises like we have had so many times before. I’m referring not only to COVID-19 but also to other diseases as well
 

cuccir

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As predicted The Guardian are not even reporting it.
Yes they are, albeit about 20 minutes after it went up on the BBC. It is now on their front page.

I can’t help but think that it’s is one of these false promises like we have had so many times before. I’m referring not only to COVID-19 but also to other diseases as well
This seems genuine, but let's be clear about it: to quote from the BBC " For patients on ventilators, it cut the risk of death from 40% to 28%. For patients needing oxygen, it cut the risk of death from 25% to 20%." It's very good news, particularly as it's a cheap and readily available drug, but equally it's only a modest improvement: it is only about 1 in 8 of all who died who would be saved. On the one hand, it's right to call it a life-saver, but it's right too not to get carried away in excitement about it.
 

Bantamzen

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I can’t help but think that it’s is one of these false promises like we have had so many times before. I’m referring not only to COVID-19 but also to other diseases as well
This though is a treatment of the symptoms, not necessarily a cure for the virus. And even if it only reduces the mortality rate it becomes another way to reduce the impact on the health services around the world.
 

yorkie

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This though is a treatment of the symptoms, not necessarily a cure for the virus. And even if it only reduces the mortality rate it becomes another way to reduce the impact on the health services around the world.
True. All these things add up. Symptoms appear to be less severe generally in recent weeks compared to earlier in the pandemic; no-one is quite certain why that is, though there are various theories. It may be a combination of factors.
 

nlogax

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I can’t help but think that it’s is one of these false promises like we have had so many times before. I’m referring not only to COVID-19 but also to other diseases as well
On the contrary I think this is really important. A vital new item in a wider armoury of drugs we'll collect to kick this thing to the curb and get our lives back. If we're aiming to reduce the mortality rate of this thing and reduce the fear of infection then drugs like these are exactly what we'll need.
 

Mag_seven

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On the contrary I think this is really important. A vital new item in a wider armoury of drugs we'll collect to kick this thing to the curb and get our lives back. If we're aiming to reduce the mortality rate of this thing and reduce the fear of infection then drugs like these are exactly what we'll need.
Chris Whitty has tweeted the following about it:

This is the most important trial result for COVID-19 so far. Significant reduction in mortality in those requiring oxygen or ventilation from a widely available, safe and well known drug. Many thanks to those who took part and made it happen. It will save lives around the world.

Must be important if the Government's chief medical adviser is positive about it.
 

MikeWM

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Dexamethasone is a cheap, well-used, well-understood drug, so this is good news indeed. I've got some sitting around somewhere in a cupboard that I was given after my last eye surgery :)
 

Chester1

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Dexamethasone is a cheap, well-used, well-understood drug, so this is good news indeed. I've got some sitting around somewhere in a cupboard that I was given after my last eye surgery :)
Cheap is an understatement. Its £5 for a course of treatment! The patent on it expired decades ago and there is already huge economy of scale because its widely used.

Its the second breakthrough in treatment after Remdesivir, that will be available and affordable in the UK. The company that developed has said it will price it to break even. I still think it will be difficult to get it in the quantities required to poorer countries. Dexamethasone should be relatively easy to provide globally. It does seem to be that there won't be a magic bullet but a large number of treatments and partially effective vaccines.
 

DelayRepay

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This seems genuine, but let's be clear about it: to quote from the BBC " For patients on ventilators, it cut the risk of death from 40% to 28%. For patients needing oxygen, it cut the risk of death from 25% to 20%." It's very good news, particularly as it's a cheap and readily available drug, but equally it's only a modest improvement: it is only about 1 in 8 of all who died who would be saved. On the one hand, it's right to call it a life-saver, but it's right too not to get carried away in excitement about it.
In my view, it's really good news. Partly because it gives a way of saving some lives. But also because it shows that science can find solutions. This drug has been found to be effective in a matter of months, which gives hope that other trials will find even more positive treatments.

Personally I was pleased to see something announced at the daily press conference that was actually good news, rather than fudged figures and promises that will either bankrupt the country or just be quietly forgotten about.
 

Bantamzen

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Cheap is an understatement. Its £5 for a course of treatment! The patent on it expired decades ago and there is already huge economy of scale because its widely used.

Its the second breakthrough in treatment after Remdesivir, that will be available and affordable in the UK. The company that developed has said it will price it to break even. I still think it will be difficult to get it in the quantities required to poorer countries. Dexamethasone should be relatively easy to provide globally. It does seem to be that there won't be a magic bullet but a large number of treatments and partially effective vaccines.
Its £5 per day actually, but a course only takes up to ten days as I understand it so it is still cheap, especially compared to the cost of any bespoke treatment that may still be under development.
 

Yew

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Its £5 per day actually, but a course only takes up to ten days as I understand it so it is still cheap, especially compared to the cost of any bespoke treatment that may still be under development.
Indeed, it's still nothing compared to the cost of keeping someone on a ventilator or Oxygen!
 

Class 33

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Daily Coronavirus deaths yesterday were 67. Of course, that's 67 more than it should be. But this is the lowest weekday deaths now since 24th March. The daily deaths are continuing to decline. Will be interesting to see the weekends figure's, as we could at long last be down to single digit weekend deaths. And hopefully we are on the verge of sub 50 deaths consistently very soon.
 

Jamesrob637

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Daily Coronavirus deaths yesterday were 67. Of course, that's 67 more than it should be. But this is the lowest weekday deaths now since 24th March. The daily deaths are continuing to decline. Will be interesting to see the weekends figure's, as we could at long last be down to single digit weekend deaths. And hopefully we are on the verge of sub 50 deaths consistently very soon.
If the combined total of tomorrow and Monday does not exceed 77 (which I shouldn't imagine it will) then the Tuesday-Monday rolling average will be a double-digit figure too. That's just as positive as the Saturday figure of 67 from today.
 

adc82140

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Aside from a couple of hotspots, the positive testing figure is now at less that 10 per 100,000. Source: BBC News. It's buried under a clickbait article entitled "Where will the next Leicester be?" but it's there all the same.
 

Bletchleyite

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Aside from a couple of hotspots, the positive testing figure is now at less that 10 per 100,000. Source: BBC News. It's buried under a clickbait article entitled "Where will the next Leicester be?" but it's there all the same.
That article essentially concludes "there is unlikely to be one in quite the same way". It will be interesting to know the reasons behind Leicester if they are worked out.
 

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