Crossrail - Construction updates and progress towards opening

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Horizon22

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I'm surprised this was signed off from a safety perspective. Westbourne Park sidings is above ground and is not exactly trespass proof

There's still a driver on the train and its presumably all locked, but yes I imagine a train may not be able to stop, but not sure if there's technology in place to prevent a collision, like automated cameras or something.
 

matt_world2004

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Neither is (say) the DLR.
But the dlr system has a camera set up and the control room can advise PSAs to get to the front of the train in the event that there is behaviour or conditions where someone is likely to end up on the tracks . I've been on a DLR train when such a call came through and the PSA was advised to get to the front due to crowding at shadwell.
 

Ianno87

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But the dlr system has a camera set up and the control room can advise PSAs to get to the front of the train in the event that there is behaviour or conditions where someone is likely to end up on the tracks . I've been on a DLR train when such a call came through and the PSA was advised to get to the front due to crowding at shadwell.

I assume there will be some CCTV cameras covering the Westbourne Park and tunnel portal area for the same purpose. And enough trains passing on the adjacent main line to put an emergency call out from a passing GWR train.
 

Horizon22

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I assume there will be some CCTV cameras covering the Westbourne Park and tunnel portal area for the same purpose.

It might well be monitored from Paddington's control room.
 

JN114

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It might well be monitored from Paddington's control room.

Unlikely they’ll directly monitor anything off-station.

More likely is it will be monitored from Crossrail’s operations centre at Romford, who will have the ability to stop all trains running under ATO remotely.
 

JN114

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Is that due to be tested?

I imagine so - presuming one that it is possible (would make sense as a feature and I believe other ATO systems have various emergency stop systems, including at a control centre level, but I’m only speculating it’s existence), and two that it hasn’t already been tested
 

mr_moo

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@Horizon22 is right about the procedure - the driver does walk to the other end while the train is travelling to the sidings, so yes, the trains will be entering under fully automatic mode with no driver looking forward.

Whilst it is ground level, it's (theoretically at least) quite hard to get to. You've got the GWML on one side, with a fence between the sidings and the running lines. At the East end you've got the Crossrail portal and the LU line in the way. At the North side you've got Marcon sidings, with tarmac lorries coming and going regularly to/from the batching/aggregates plant. There's security on the Tarmac entrance gate, and Tarmac sidings to cross before you get to the Crossrail sidings. To the West the railway narrows under Great Western Road bridge. There is an access point off Elkstone road so they could theoretically get in there if they can get the gate open somehow. After that the railway corridor is hemmed in for quite a way.
I suppose if someone wanted to be really determined/stupid they could enter via Westbourne park tube station and cross the GWML then enter the sidings from the West but the chance of them getting in without being spotted and/or hit by a train or electrocuted by the LU juice rails would be very remote, and they are entering at the end where the reversing trains have stopped so lower risk too.

Overall, not too bad at all and I imagine the risk assessment would be reasonable. I would assume there would be an array of cameras in the sidings too to ensure anyone in there would be spotted quickly - that would seem a reasonable risk mitigation.

On a totally different note, Crossrail are planning some simulated emergency excercises soon. A request for volunteers was issued recently, but it's only for internal staff so I can't share the link or let anyone here have a go!
 

iphone76

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Sorry for not replying yesterday - I was out for the day.

I don't believe the testing went that well for various reasons. The next test will be 3rd October so let's hope it works then.

I did hear that they had employed land sheriffs to monitor the sidings but I wasn't working so not sure if that happened.

The process isn't as described as above. Before leaving Paddington, we acknowledge the auto- reverse icon, turn the master control switch to shutdown and remove our key. The train moves towards the sidings and we stay in the Westbound cab until the train comes to a stand in the sidings.

We then walk to the Eastbound cab during which time once the departure time arrives, the train will automatically head to Paddington. I would imagine most drivers would had reached the other end before it heads back to Paddington, but I guess in cases of late running it could set-off soon after it arrives.

My disclaimer is that's what we were issued with the other day.
 

kevin_roche

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Sorry for not replying yesterday - I was out for the day.

I don't believe the testing went that well for various reasons. The next test will be 3rd October so let's hope it works then.

I did hear that they had employed land sheriffs to monitor the sidings but I wasn't working so not sure if that happened.

The process isn't as described as above. Before leaving Paddington, we acknowledge the auto- reverse icon, turn the master control switch to shutdown and remove our key. The train moves towards the sidings and we stay in the Westbound cab until the train comes to a stand in the sidings.

We then walk to the Eastbound cab during which time once the departure time arrives, the train will automatically head to Paddington. I would imagine most drivers would had reached the other end before it heads back to Paddington, but I guess in cases of late running it could set-off soon after it arrives.

My disclaimer is that's what we were issued with the other day.
Thank you for the detailed explanation. Very interesting.
 

Horizon22

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Sorry for not replying yesterday - I was out for the day.

I don't believe the testing went that well for various reasons. The next test will be 3rd October so let's hope it works then.

I did hear that they had employed land sheriffs to monitor the sidings but I wasn't working so not sure if that happened.

The process isn't as described as above. Before leaving Paddington, we acknowledge the auto- reverse icon, turn the master control switch to shutdown and remove our key. The train moves towards the sidings and we stay in the Westbound cab until the train comes to a stand in the sidings.

We then walk to the Eastbound cab during which time once the departure time arrives, the train will automatically head to Paddington. I would imagine most drivers would had reached the other end before it heads back to Paddington, but I guess in cases of late running it could set-off soon after it arrives.

My disclaimer is that's what we were issued with the other day.

Most helpful in understanding the process, thanks. What is the general turnaround in the sidings expected to be in the timetable; 5-7 minutes?
 

matt_world2004

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Sorry for not replying yesterday - I was out for the day.

I don't believe the testing went that well for various reasons. The next test will be 3rd October so let's hope it works then.

I did hear that they had employed land sheriffs to monitor the sidings but I wasn't working so not sure if that happened.

The process isn't as described as above. Before leaving Paddington, we acknowledge the auto- reverse icon, turn the master control switch to shutdown and remove our key. The train moves towards the sidings and we stay in the Westbound cab until the train comes to a stand in the sidings.

We then walk to the Eastbound cab during which time once the departure time arrives, the train will automatically head to Paddington. I would imagine most drivers would had reached the other end before it heads back to Paddington, but I guess in cases of late running it could set-off soon after it arrives.

My disclaimer is that's what we were issued with the other day.
Who has the responsibility for monitoring the sidings is it tfl / MTR or network rail
 

306024

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Most helpful in understanding the process, thanks. What is the general turnaround in the sidings expected to be in the timetable; 5-7 minutes?

For normal planning it is a minimum of 7 minutes. If the auto-reverse fails you still need time for the driver to drive manually, without impacting on the return working. It could be reduced slightly in future if the technology proves 100% reliable but best to start with a bit of contingency. Auto-reverse does allow for the potential to recover from minor late running so is still worth having.
 

Horizon22

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Who has the responsibility for monitoring the sidings is it tfl / MTR or network rail

Solely managed by TfL (the name of the exact subsidiary company escapes me). The division between NR/XR infrastructure is where the relief lines diverge to the CRL West and East lines.
 

matt_world2004

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Solely managed by TfL (the name of the exact subsidiary company escapes me). The division between NR/XR infrastructure is where the relief lines diverge to the CRL West and East lines.
Rail for London I guess the company name is
 

306024

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12 trains an hour gives a 16 minute turnaround time at the sidings.

13 minutes is the maximum possible for a 12 tph service, assuming using 3 sidings and 2 minute siding re-occupation. In practice you should plan for a bigger siding re-occupation margin to make the timetable more flexible, especially once these trains have to merge with trains from the west.
 
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rd749249

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You’re probably right, I’m not a mathematician. We currently occupy the westbound too so my diagram is 16 mins turnaround.
 

306024

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You’re probably right, I’m not a mathematician. We currently occupy the westbound too so my diagram is 16 mins turnaround.

Yes you get longer turnrounds using effectively a fourth siding.

The one time plan to turn 24tph required the use of the eastbound too. 24tph with 5 sidings and a 2.5 minute platform re-occupation equates to a maximum of 10 minutes available to turnround. But every fifth train has to cut across the other four so it isn’t quite as simple as that.

With the same assumptions if you only use four sidings to reverse a 24tph service that reduces the available turnround time to 7.5 minutes, with every fourth train having to cut across the other three.
 
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HSTEd

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At some point doesn't it just become easier to tunnel a balloon loop?
 

AM9

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At some point doesn't it just become easier to tunnel a balloon loop?
But a loop has a fixed capacity which would be prohibitively expensive to increase especially after its high initial cost. Minor adjustments to the number of sidings are relatively easy to provide.
 

306024

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At some point doesn't it just become easier to tunnel a balloon loop?

Well operationally perhaps, if you include a couple of extra tracks to allow trains to step back for timetable resilience. Of course cost enters into it, but once Old Oak HS2 station opens you are left with a rather large white elephant.
 

Ianno87

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And balloon loops create long term maintenance issues with rail and flange wear.
 

kevin_roche

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The Agenda and papers for the Elizabeth Line Committee are now published on the TfL website.

In item 6 page 17 sections 3.3 and 3.4 it says:

Trial Running has broadly been positive and although there have been a number
of expected settling down issues encountered, they relate to known issues in the
current software configuration. These are expected to be resolved with the
upcoming software release known as ELR100.
and...
The ELR100 software should be the last major configuration before revenue
service and is pivotal to the programme advancing through to the next stage,
known as Trial Operations. It is expected that the software will be assured and
commissioned in October.

In item 6 page 18 section 3.10 it says:

It is forecasted that Trial Operations will commence in November 2021, at the
earliest, however several key milestones need to be met before this important
and final phase of the programme can commence.

In item 6 page 19 section 3.14 it says:

The next station to be transferred is Canary Wharf. It is expected that, alongside
the final integration of Abbey Wood station, Canary Wharf will be transferred in
autumn 2021. Bond Street is on target to achieve the configuration necessary to
be able to support Trial Operations, and works are continuing at the station for it
to be ready for passenger service.

So some progress might be seen towards opening in the next two months.

There is a new video on YouTube showing the stations that have been handed over so far:

 
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Horizon22

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The Evening Standard reports today no opening until May 2022, blowing any early 2022 start out of the water;


Hopes of Crossrail opening early next year appear set to be dashed after inspectors raised new concerns about its trains and stations.
They said it was now forecast to open next May, when Elizabeth line trains will run under central London for the first time.
The exact opening date in May has been withheld, but the report, by the Crossrail watchdog Jacobs, said it was at the latter part of the six-month “opening window” of the first six months of 2022 promised by Transport for London.

I gather this info is broadly gleaned from the reports above, although with a more pessimistic stance. Frankly a May ‘22 start would be more sensible to sync up anyway (even if they are only running on their dedicated tracks).
 

Snow1964

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The TfL finance committee papers are published, and it has various graphs, on page 4 is the Elizabeth line, and it seems the usage budget goes maximum in period 10 2021-22 (TfL use 13 periods of 4 weeks April-March, so is Christmas- Jan2022), for one period only

Not sure if this means a launch service has been budgeted for that date, otherwise cant see why it is so much higher than the other 4 week periods


My guess was when the budget was set (March ?) TfL Board assumed opening just before Christmas, even though now sounds like nearer May 2022
 
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