"Dozy driver 'leaps off runaway train' - with passengers still on board"

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mbreckers

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Having read the article, is there not a better way for the driver to contact the guard in a situation like this? And wouldnt the guard have checked anyway whether the train was fully on the platform?

http://www.thescottishsun.co.uk/sco...-runaway-train-with-passsengers-on-board.html

A DOZY train driver is being probed after allegedly jumping out the vehicle with hundreds of travellers on board without putting on the brake - letting it roll down the platform.

The rail worker is believed to have panicked after undershooting the platform in Rosyth, Fife, and dashed to let a guard know he couldn’t let people leave the train.

But he is thought to have forgot to put the brake on, meaning it was a “runaway train” before safety measures brought it to a halt.

Scotrail has now launched an investigation into the incident, which is believed to have happened shortly after 8am on March 14.

A source said: “It seems this day he’s driven short of the platform by mistake, meaning the back passenger door would have been off the platform.

“People aren’t at their most alert that early in the morning, so could easily have ended up falling onto the tracks.

“The driver has noticed and then dashed out to tell the guard not to let people leave, but clearly forgotten about the brake.

“The train’s then started rolling down the tracks, before thankfully the security back-up kicked in.

“It’s a real blunder and could have been a disaster if the doors were open and passengers were walking out as it moved. It’s embarrassing for him and the company.”

The driver works for an external company, Direct Rail Services, which does journeys in Fife for Scotrail.

It’s been suggested the driver has been taken off trips involving passengers until the probe is completed.

A ScotRail spokeswoman said: “We are aware of an incident at Rosyth and, together with Direct Rail Services, are conducting a full investigation into what happened.”
 
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najaB

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Shows how much I still have to learn - I wouldn't have thought it possible to leave the cab without the brakes being on.
 

greatkingrat

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Isn't that what the buzzer is for?

2-2 Do Not Open Doors seems appropriate here
 

mbreckers

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Shows how much I still have to learn - I wouldn't have thought it possible to leave the cab without the brakes being on.

I would have assumed that it's standard policy to make sure your train cant move or be moved before you ever leave the cab.

I'm also assuming that the safety system in question that stopped the train was the dead mans switch (pedal?) in this case
 
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If it's the 68 there wouldn't be a buzzer to my knowledge, would be on the guard to notice in that case and any LHCS guard worth their salt I hope would, we all know where we should be when the train has stopped!

Still yes brake on first!
 

mbreckers

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I'd guess this was the hauled set with 68s then?

RTT (although it doesnt go as far back as the 14th), does show that two services just after 0800 today were both:

  • Timed for 100mph max
  • Diesel locomotive, trailing load 245 tonnes

So I'm guessing so

(That and it was a DRS driver)
 
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cjmillsnun

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Shouldn't the DSD have dealt with this before the driver even left the cab?
 

455driver

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Shouldn't the DSD have dealt with this before the driver even left the cab?
If the train is left in forward then it would stop almost imediately, if the train has been put into neutral then the DSD will activate at 5(ish)mph and would indeed stop the train.

If this driver has 'panicked' then I would question his or her suitability to do the job!
--- old post above --- --- new post below ---
How far did the 'runaway' train go?
Not very far, see above.
 
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GB

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In the railway world the incident was reported as a simple stopped short, conductor released doors, no one observed alighting, doors locked, train pulled up to correct stopping point.

No sure where this other serious accusation has come from.
 

kevconnor

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On the DRS stock used on the Cumbrian Coast Line it is the same with DRS drivers and northern guards. Whenever I have been on them between Carlisle and Whitehaven the guard and the driver have walkie-talkies and confirm with each other if it is OK for the doors to be released. I would have thought something similar may be in use on the Fife circle.
 

TDK

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Do 68's have DRA fitted (passenger work, so assuming they do) and does it have a traction interlock?

The DRA is irrelevant as it is a device to remind drivers of certain things a train could roll for miles with the DRA set pending on gradient. I doubt the power was on if the driver had already stopped.
 

Latecomer

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I doubt there are many drivers who have not had a roll (however small) when distracted by something else or without having gone through all the normal checking procedures. Sunlight making the DRA appear unlit and attempting to take power but the train rolls back? Failed to check the position of the brake controller when you key on after changing ends and it had been left off by another driver? Failed to get interlock and attempted to take power? Are their may drivers on multistop services that have never had any of these events?!

There are distraction elements involved in most operational incidents. If this case is true then it would appear that the stop short was the distracting factor in the driver not going through the normal checks when bringing the train to a stand or on exiting the cab.

As presented the event is a serious one but on the face of it, without knowing the true facts, I don't see that it means the individual is unfit for the role. A massive wake up call yes, but after a debrief they have every reason to bring their learning to bear in the event of of another incident and possibly deal with it in a more proficient manner than those who have an unblemished record.
 
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168lover

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On the DRS stock used on the Cumbrian Coast Line it is the same with DRS drivers and northern guards. Whenever I have been on them between Carlisle and Whitehaven the guard and the driver have walkie-talkies and confirm with each other if it is OK for the doors to be released. I would have thought something similar may be in use on the Fife circle.

A similar system is in place on the 68 hauled Chilterns
 
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