Dukinfield Dog Lane station

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lancastrian

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In the Guide Bridge area, there once was a station called Dukinfield Dog Lane. What became of that station site?

I have been looking into it after your question, I am on holiday at this time, so there are some of my books I cannot access at this time.

This is what I can tell you. It was located between Guide Bridge & the stations of Flowery Field & Hyde North. On the Woodhead Line.
I have tried to find Dog Lane on a modern map of he area but no luck, so it is either been renamed or built over. Possibly it could have bee somewhere under what became Dewsnap Sidings, so Dog Lane could have disappeared when they were built.

Dukinfield Dog Lane was opened 17th November 1841 and closed 23rd December 1845.
Another station on a slightly different site near to the first, called Dog Lane.
It was re-opened 1st May 1846 and finally closed 1st November 1847.

I hope that this helps.
 

Gloster

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I reckon that it was one side or other of Astley Street as that road’s bridge over the railway is called Dog Lane Bridge on an 1894 map. There isn’t much room between the Peak Forest Canal and the bridge, so it was more likely on the east side of the bridge. However, the lines have been quadrupled, which probably removed all trace of the old station.

EDIT: I have found a reference to Astley Street previously being called Dog Lane. There was also Dog Lane Basin on the canal, just north of the bridge where Ashton Street crossed it; coal from Dewsnap Colliery was brought down to the basin.
 
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Bevan Price

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I reckon that it was one side or other of Astley Street as that road’s bridge over the railway is called Dog Lane Bridge on an 1894 map. There isn’t much room between the Peak Forest Canal and the bridge, so it was more likely on the east side of the bridge. However, the lines have been quadrupled, which probably removed all trace of the old station.

EDIT: I have found a reference to Astley Street previously being called Dog Lane. There was also Dog Lane Basin on the canal, just north of the bridge where Ashton Street crossed it; coal from Dewsnap Colliery was brought down to the basin.

Dog Lane Bridge can be seen in this old map, with Dog Lane Siding to its right. There was a signal box (SB) next to the bridge, but any station was long gone -- and was probably just a primitive wayside halt, with maybe little more than a basic hut and no proper platform.
 
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Dukinfield Dog Lane was opened 17th November 1841 and closed 23rd December 1845.
Another station on a slightly different site near to the first, called Dog Lane.
It was re-opened 1st May 1846 and finally closed 1st November 1847.
Some lazy journalist will no doubt call that a "Beeching closure!" :lol:
 

Mcr Warrior

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Surely 'Dukinfield Central' was a separate station on a different line, i.e. between Guide Bridge and Ashton?
 

Xenophon PCDGS

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Surely 'Dukinfield Central' was a separate station on a different line, i.e. between Guide Bridge and Ashton?
Dukinfield Central (1864-1959) was situated on Wharf Street, adjacent to the Peak Forest Canal. It was on the Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire line that connected Guide Bridge to Stalybridge. There were two intermediate stations....
Dukinfield Central
Ashton Park Parade
 

billh

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Dog Lane Station was opened before the Sheffield route was completed. I think it was always intended to be only temporary. When it was in use trains from Manchester connected with passenger "packet" boats on the Peak Forest Canal with destinations of Marple & Macclesfield. To save time, passengers disembarked at the lower of the sixteen Marple Locks (where there was a hotel) and passengers walked or took a carriage to the top lock where another boat continued the journey to Macclesfield. The service was provided by one Isaac Watt Boulton who later became a supplier of locomotives to railway contractors and industrial users. The boats he used were bought second hand from the Forth & Clyde Canal and were smaller than the usual bulk cargo carrying vessels but carried parcels and light goods along with the passengers.
Last time I looked there was (is?) a cast iron crane king post in the corner of the railway bridge and canal, this was for lifting goods from rail to boat and vice versa. The remains of Dog Lane canal basin can still be seen, not to be confused with the Astley Coal Co's much larger basin and dry dock a few hundred yards further north.
Guide Bridge East signal box was about 50 yards west of the canal bridge, the foundations of this can still be seen.
The geography of the area was changed drastically at the turn of the 19th century with the construction of the huge GCR wagon works and Dewsnap goods yard , the latter was built on the site of the Dewsnap colliery
 
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A new station for Dukinfield is one of TfGM aspirations, but would be located at the other (eastern) end of the former Dewsnap yard at the King Street / Dewsnap Lane bridge. It would replace Hyde North which can only be served by Marple services and not Hadfeld. Flowery Field is also very close to Hyde North for its former passengers.
 
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