examples of coaching stock with Pantographs/Third rail etc

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popeter45

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so i came across this image of the SBB EW-III restaurant cars and how they have there own pantograph i assume for powering the kichen equipent
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apart from departmental stock for testing OHLE tension are there any other examples of self-powered loco hauled carriages and the reason for it?
 
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DanielB

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The first generation double deck coaches in The Netherlands (DDM-1) had pantographs on the driving trailers. This was still in the time that NS operated both passenger and cargo services. Idea behind it was that the pantograph could keep the carriages powered while stabled overnight, so the locomotives class 1600 could be decoupled making them available to pull cargo trains at night.

 

Davester50

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I remember seeing West German restaurant cars with pantographs when I was on holiday in the Black Forest during the mid-80s.
 

JonasB

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so i came across this image of the SBB EW-III restaurant cars and how they have there own pantograph i assume for powering the kichen equipent

Correct, they where used to power the kitchen equipment when there was no loco attached to the train.
 

Beebman

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The metre-gauge RhB in Switzerland has luggage cars with pantographs to supply power when locomotives are detached.
 

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duesselmartin

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I remember seeing West German restaurant cars with pantographs when I was on holiday in the Black Forest during the mid-80s.
yes, was common in Germany and Switzerland. It was only used when the train was stationary to ensure power supply during a loco change ect.
 

Davester50

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yes, was common in Germany and Switzerland. It was only used when the train was stationary to ensure power supply during a loco change ect.
Thanks.
As a youngster, it all seemed all quite exotic these international trains hurtling down the Rhine Valley towards Freiburg, and on to Basel (and no-doubt further afield).
I shall have to do a bit of searching online for photos of that era :)
 

etr221

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The brake end coaches of the Metropolitan Rly. 'Dreadnought' (later LT 'Steam') stock were fitted with collector shoes, and the whole fleet with through wiring, both to avoid gapping whan electrically hauled, and later to power electric heating, from c1915 until their end.

I have seen reference to the North Koreans having/using pantograph fitted catering vehicles.
 

MarcVD

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SNCB M7 Bmx... locomotive and passenger carriage mixed together...
 

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Gag Halfrunt

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I have seen reference to the North Koreans having/using pantograph fitted catering vehicles.

Pantographs can be found on seating cars, so they are for general purpose power supplies. There is an example in this thread (coincidentally a second-hand Swiss car, but with pantographs added in North Korea):

 

MarcVD

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Oh, I like that! Best of all worlds in a single neat package.
Still under test for the moment. Once approved, will be used to form rames of 4 or 6 cars. Can be MUed together or with locos serie 18. 3/25 kV, 3000 kW, 200 kN. 50 ordered in the first batch, there will be more.
 

XAM2175

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the mDDM-carriages in The Netherlands are similar, although with the engines on the lower floor and passenger area on the top floor.
And Bo-Bo-Bo configuration to make them even more unconventional!
 

DanielB

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And Bo-Bo-Bo configuration to make them even more unconventional!
Indeed! They got those six axles to prevent adhesion problems as they were built with 2400 kW of power to allow them to be as fast as Mat'64 (as on several routes a mix of double deckers and single deck trainsets were used).
What I didn't now yet, but just read, is the unconventional ability of the middle bogie to move sideways up to 15 cm. This to allow the mDDM to pass through curves.

Unfortunately however, the DDZ-trainsets which currently contain these carriages have been out of service for almost half a year now, due to uncommon vibrations which are being investigated.
 

37201xoIM

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The metre-gauge RhB in Switzerland has luggage cars with pantographs to supply power when locomotives are detached.
Slightly pedantic, perhaps, but my understanding is that these were actually fitted with pans because, as the trains on the main Albula line got longer and longer, it was too much ETS all to be provided by the loco - it may have been more about the limits on what the ETS bus / cable could take, than about a limit on the ETS capability of the Ge 4/4 III, I suspect. So the pans were raised when in motion, not just when a loco was detached. I think they're not longer needed now, though (and in any event they've of course now got the AGZ sets on the Albula line anyway).
 

STEVIEBOY1

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I did see a single carriage moving on it's own once in Brig - Switzerland, with no pant or diesel, some one told me that some trains had batteries to move short distances, I suppose it was shunting itself.
 

superalbs

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I did see a single carriage moving on it's own once in Brig - Switzerland, with no pant or diesel, some one told me that some trains had batteries to move short distances, I suppose it was shunting itself.
Strange!!
 

30907

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I did see a single carriage moving on it's own once in Brig - Switzerland, with no pant or diesel, some one told me that some trains had batteries to move short distances, I suppose it was shunting itself.
Or being fly-shunted, I've seen that.
 

dazzler

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Or being fly-shunted, I've seen that.

I've seen single carriages being pushed along the platform by station staff at Brig (FO/BVZ terminus, as it was at the time!) - give it a good shove, then jump on the footboard and operate the handbrake through the open door! o_O

Our room on the first floor of the Hotel Victoria was an ideal viewpoint for this! :D
 
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I did see a single carriage moving on it's own once in Brig - Switzerland, with no pant or diesel, some one told me that some trains had batteries to move short distances, I suppose it was shunting itself.
Many years ago, CIÉ in Ireland had some "powered intermediate" diesel railcars that were gangwayed at both ends but lacked cabs, thus externally resembling an ordinary carriage. (They weren't built new but converted from units with cabs, including some rather ugly Bulleid-designed examples.) Apparently, these could run on their own for shunting purposes, driven from controls in one of the vestibules, which must have looked fairly odd.
 
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