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Forth Rail Bridge Weather Limitations?

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Clansman

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All you hear in the news nowadays up here is "Forth Road Bridge repairs' , 'Forth Bridge closed to HGVs due to the weather" etc.

Does the rail bridge have any limitations where severe weather would be enough to affect rail services going over in any way? Ie reduced speed, complete closure - that sort of thing.

Understandably the bridge is huge and built for purpose, but it is over 100 years old (regenerated over the years obviously) so it surely must have some degree of limitation? Just curious :)
 
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route:oxford

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Does the rail bridge have any limitations where severe weather would be enough to affect rail services going over in any way? Ie reduced speed, complete closure - that sort of thing.

Which rail bridge over the Forth?

I don't believe that the one that I cross most often, built 1848, has ever closed due to severe weather conditions. I can't imagine the one alongside, built 1853, being any different.
 

jadmor

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I can't recall the rail bridge ever closing due to weather, I have been over on very stormy days. The road bridge rarely closes completely, but there is no wind barrier to protect hi sided vehicles. Apart from high winds, it closed at least once due to ice on the deck.
 

najaB

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Does the rail bridge have any limitations where severe weather would be enough to affect rail services going over in any way? Ie reduced speed, complete closure - that sort of thing.
I suspect that, much like the Tay Bridge, it would need gusts in excess of 100mph before they would consider suspending services.
 

GRALISTAIR

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I suspect that, much like the Tay Bridge, it would need gusts in excess of 100mph before they would consider suspending services.

But as stated on the Scottish Electrification thread, it sure means that the OHLE would have to be robust but also meet needs of Heritage/Listed Structure status. No easy task - sorry to be slightly OT. I could see post-electrification the closing for weather (high winds) being more likely - possibly.
 

Trog

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The Forth Rail bridge was built just after the fall of the first Tay bridge. I am sure I have read that it is designed to withstand a full hurricane blowing in from the North Sea at one end, while a second hurricane blows out to sea along the other bank of the Firth. That would probably not be a good day to visit Inchgarvie by boat.
 

Taunton

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it is designed to withstand a full hurricane blowing in from the North Sea at one end, while a second hurricane blows out to sea along the other bank of the Firth.
A reasonably accurate description of many Edinburgh winter days :)
 

edwin_m

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I suppose that depends on the solution chosen. If it's solid conductor rail then probably not.

And if it's solid conductor painted the appropriate shade of red lead substitute then it should virtually disappear amongst all the other random struts and girders.
 

GRALISTAIR

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And if it's solid conductor painted the appropriate shade of red lead substitute then it should virtually disappear amongst all the other random struts and girders.

Yes these days they tend to use zinc phosphate or zinc molybdate as the anti-corrosion pigment and red iron oxide such as Bayferrox 160M as the colour pigment. It will need the mother of all earth bonds too I should imagine -with the bridge itself as a section so any dead short will immediately trip the circuit breakers etc.
 

DarloRich

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The Forth Bridge is so vast that the winds required to close it would have to be massive.

Yes these days they tend to use zinc phosphate or zinc molybdate as the anti-corrosion pigment and red iron oxide such as Bayferrox 160M as the colour pigment. It will need the mother of all earth bonds too I should imagine -with the bridge itself as a section so any dead short will immediately trip the circuit breakers etc.

just run it down into the water. What could possible go wrong? ;)
 
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