Found in Grandads shed, can anyone help identify these railway parts?

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UKBrad

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Hi,

Found these when clearing out my grandads shed. I believe these are all train related, can someone help identify these for me and tell me what they are used for.

Thanks.
 

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alex17595

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Burton on Trent
The first one is clamps, probably to hold fish plates on.
3rd one is some bit of rail with various clips to attach it to the sleeper.
4th one looks like a fishplate of some kind.
5th one is a clamp to lock points in one direction.

No clue about the others.
 

John Webb

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St Albans
1) 'G' clamps used to hold emergency fishplates to the rail until a proper repair can be made.
2) don't know - possibly for holding van doors open?
3) Top left - metal key for holding bullhead track in chair. Are the rail sections metallic? If they are plastic/fibre, then they are insulators that fit between the ends of rails to separate two different track circuit sections. The spike between the two rail sections is used to hold down flat-bottom track, usually with the rail resting on a baseplate - the spike passes through a hole in the baseplate into the sleeper to hold both track and baseplate down. Three or four spikes would be used for each baseplate.
4) Fishplate - can't see if it has any special features.
5) Clamp to hold a point blade firmly in place when a trailing point, not normally used for facing movements for passenger traffic, is to be used for such. Once clamped in place, the loop is swung up and holds the handle, which is then padlocked to prevent movement of the clamp until the train has passed; also prevents unauthorised removal of the clamp.
 
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unclefreddy

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21 Mar 2016
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Chippenham, Wiltshire
Notice that the rail sections are all flat bottom, with no bullhead bits. Thanks to John Webb for clearing a mystery for me. I was never sure if was "Bullhead" or "Bullied". In my neck of the woods "H"s get dropped for a pastime, hence the confusion on my part. If it had been "Bullied" I was intrigued about track before Oliver had a look at it.
 

DasLunatic

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11 May 2015
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It's Bulleid, Fred. AFAIK, there was no-one high in the railway hierachy with the surname Bullied.
 

Spannerman

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In Picture 3 the twin clips (they are upside at the moment) at the very top look like rail creep preventers. They are hammered onto FB rail and also resting against a sleeper/baseplate to prevent movement of rail in certain conditions. Very difficult to remove once rusted on unless the rail is upside down of course.
 

ComUtoR

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UK
Don't think you'd get very sentimental over them they're not very exciting but each to their own I suppose.

When someone dies. It is often the little things that we hold dear. I had a relative who died recently and the little plastic beads she used to make into bracelets have sentimental value. Not worth a penny but to me its a reminder of her every time I see them.

The OP didn't ask for value. Just identification.
 

Trog

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30 Oct 2009
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Is the last photo the end of one of the two rail anchors at the top of the third photo?
The off cuts of rail in the third photo appear to be of the 113A section, as the web has parallel sides.
The oblong plate with the two holes may be a gauge stop, if a chair or baseplate was starting to push out you screwed the plate to the sleeper touching the chair to stop it sliding across the sleeper.
The walking stick shaped clip in the third picture is an elastic spike and would have been used in BR1, BR1S, BR3, BR3a and BR4 baseplates. They were also sometimes used without baseplates to hold guard rails.
 
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