Gateshead Quaylink buses - the only ones in the UK

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Tramfan

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They've been sitting around disused for quite a long time now at Stagecoach's Walkergate depot in Newcastle, since the Quaylink service they operated on went to Go North East.
 

starrymarkb

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I believe the type originates in New Zealand, at the time none of the UK manufacturers were making Hybrids and I believe they are quite primitive compared to the newer designs.
 

Jonny

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They've been sitting around disused for quite a long time now at Stagecoach's Walkergate depot in Newcastle, since the Quaylink service they operated on went to Go North East.
I heard that the new diesels were more efficient as well :o
 

mbonwick

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They've been sitting around disused for quite a long time now at Stagecoach's Walkergate depot in Newcastle, since the Quaylink service they operated on went to Go North East.
They were sold last month to NexGen Power Group, who intend to convert them to all-electric vehicles.
 

Schnellzug

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ISTR that GNE said the hybrid buses weren't powerful enough for the steep hills on the routes - and that the new diesel buses had lower emissions too.
I've heard it said about Hybrids that they sometimes actually use more fuel than ordinary ones, particularly in hilly areas, because the drain on the batteries is such that the generators have to be running all the time, and because they're underpowered they use far more fuel.
Electric power: all right for milk floats.
 

142094

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ISTR that GNE said the hybrid buses weren't powerful enough for the steep hills on the routes - and that the new diesel buses had lower emissions too.
This was certainly true for the electric ones (mentioned in the OP).

Stagecoach used to have a service that ran along Walker Road, up Dean Street and Grainger Street to Central Station, which used single-decker diesels - and they too some battering going up and down the hills all day.
 

MCW

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I've heard it said about Hybrids that they sometimes actually use more fuel than ordinary ones, particularly in hilly areas, because the drain on the batteries is such that the generators have to be running all the time, and because they're underpowered they use far more fuel.
Electric power: all right for milk floats.
It's better in an urban city situation for shorter routes, definitely.

I can never see diesels being completely taken out of the equation in the next ten years. there will always be an application for low emission diesel buses until such hybrid technology has been invested in further.

also little off topic, but think of the Northampton Gas buses?
 
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