General Knowledge Quiz

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Calthrop

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Thanks.

There is a -- quite well-known -- novel, about the doings of a highly un-military and un-useful soldier. This anti-hero turned out over time to become, in his way, an actual hero for many of the folk of the nationality / people to which he, and the author, belong(ed). This people were citizens of one country up to the end of World War I; and of another, from then until 1993, since when they have been a full nation in their own right.

Which is the nationality / people / "tribe" concerned here?

And what is the title of the novel? (English-translation title -- plus, in the original language in which it was written, if you like !)

"Bonus points" for the name of the author.
 

Jimbob52

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Thanks.

There is a -- quite well-known -- novel, about the doings of a highly un-military and un-useful soldier. This anti-hero turned out over time to become, in his way, an actual hero for many of the folk of the nationality / people to which he, and the author, belong(ed). This people were citizens of one country up to the end of World War I; and of another, from then until 1993, since when they have been a full nation in their own right.

Which is the nationality / people / "tribe" concerned here?

And what is the title of the novel? (English-translation title -- plus, in the original language in which it was written, if you like !)

"Bonus points" for the name of the author.
I think the nation is Austria-Hungary; Czechoslovakia; Slovakia and the title is 'The Good Soldier, Shweck' (not sure of the spelling). I can't remember the author.
 

MotCO

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Thanks.

There is a -- quite well-known -- novel, about the doings of a highly un-military and un-useful soldier. This anti-hero turned out over time to become, in his way, an actual hero for many of the folk of the nationality / people to which he, and the author, belong(ed). This people were citizens of one country up to the end of World War I; and of another, from then until 1993, since when they have been a full nation in their own right.

Which is the nationality / people / "tribe" concerned here?

And what is the title of the novel? (English-translation title -- plus, in the original language in which it was written, if you like !)

"Bonus points" for the name of the author.
I'm thinking that this is the war in Sarajevo, so maybe the 'tribe' is the Slovaks? Don't know about the book though.
 
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I think the nation is Austria-Hungary; Czechoslovakia; Slovakia and the title is 'The Good Soldier, Shweck' (not sure of the spelling). I can't remember the author.
I think Jimbob has it except that it's the Czech Republic, not Slovakia. The author was Jaroslav Hasek. The Good Soldier Svejk (or Schweik in older editions) is one of my favourite books.
 

Calthrop

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@Jimbob52 , @MotCO : reckonably bad luck, that you plumped for the wrong one of those particular "not-so-heavenly twins": Jimbob, you got essentially the book title, but not the nationality. Victory, thus, to @John Griffiths.

The novel isn't everybody's cup of tea; but many people -- including me, and yourself JG -- find it a terrific read. There's an IMO wonderful 1930 translation into English, by Paul Selver -- the form in which I first became acquainted with the book. Another translation came out in the 1970s, by Cecil Parrott; seems to be generally acclaimed as highly scholarly, and more complete than the 1930 translation -- but to me, Parrott's rendering came across as dull and plodding and uninspired, in comparison with Selver's, earlier, work.

John Griffiths: beg to report, it's your floor.
 

341o2

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May I try a literary/musical question.
Many years ago, someone wrote an allegorical tale regarding Christianity.
Fast forward to the 20th centuary, and an English composer, especially of church music, although officially agnostic, set it to music, although he changed the name of the leading character and preferred to call it a morality rather than an opera.
After several years, he doubted that the work would ever be performed, so incorporated some of the music in another of his compositions premiered at the Albert Hall, London 1943.

Name and title of the book
Composer and title of the work using some of the themes please
 

Calthrop

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Blind guess, just re the book (I'm the world's greatest ignoramus on the subject of music) -- Piers Plowman by Langland?
 

341o2

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Afraid not. The author was imprisoned for taking part in a religious service outside the Church of England, his narration is in the form of a dream and one phrase which originates in the book and passed into general use is the Slough of Despond. Eventually the central character arrives at the Celestial City.
 

341o2

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You are right about the Pilgrim's Progress, which is also the name of the opera, can anyone name the work that used some of the music from it and the composer?
His first symphony includes soloists and choir, based on poetry by Walt Whitman, a Sea Symphony. Other well known works include the Lark Ascending, Sinfonia Antarctica, used for the film of Scott of the Antarctic. Hymn tunes include those to "Come down O Love Divine" and "For all the Saints"
 

341o2

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Yes, the composer is RVW, and the work incorporating music from the Pilgrims Progress is the 5th Symphony. After the acrid 4th using dissonance, the 5th a complete change, peaceful, pastoral. Reminds me of Rolt and others visiting the Talyllyn, with the peace of the valley, it seemed inconcevable that Manchester and Brirmingham were likewise being repeatedly bombed. Also, Whitman wrote "To a Locomotive in Winter", to my knowlege never set to music.
So we have two replies, each with 1/3 of the complete answer, I suggest you decide between yourselves who takes the floor
 

xotGD

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OK US Geography. Should be easy. The 4 corners is a region of the USA in Native American Indian Territory. 4 states meet in a corner. Name all 4 states.
I posed the very same question on this thread back in January. Alas I can't remember the answer!
 

GRALISTAIR

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Just seen the story in The Washington Post of all places. These two shook hands under the channel when the Channel Tunnel breakthrough was made. They remained friends and are not fazed by Brexit according to WaPo
 

MotCO

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Just seen the story in The Washington Post of all places. These two shook hands under the channel when the Channel Tunnel breakthrough was made. They remained friends and are not fazed by Brexit according to WaPo
You are indeed correct. (I thought it might have lasted longer than 10 minutes!)

Your turn to make a break-through.
 

MotCO

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Gordon Welchman was a key member of the Bletchley Park team that broke Enigma. He moved to the USA as he was extremely valuable. What US state did he die in?
I've got a 1:50 chance of being right! I'll say Virginia, home of the Pentagon.
 

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