Graffitti Attack on units stabled at Sheffield overnight on 13th May 17

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bus man

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Reports that units stabled at Sheffield over night possibly in what was called the fish dock / motorail siding have been subject to a graffitti stack. The units are reported to be in service.


Nfd
 
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ash39

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Thought as much, saw a couple at Leeds although not the worst I've seen by any means. 144002 had one cab front done and 142024 had a fairly large bit on the sides but not covering windows.
 

humbersidejim

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Won't be a popular opinion on here, but I think that looks pretty good... an improvement of sorts anyway!

Ha, I must admit I thought the same. Very non-corporate of me!

Part of the appeal is that I have absolutely no idea what the letters/tags mean.

I wonder whether there's an opportunity for some sort of 'art train' or 'grafitti carriage' to be commissioned? I guess that would only be seen to be encouraging vandalism.
 
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61653 HTAFC

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Ha, I must admit I thought the same. Very non-corporate of me!

Part of the appeal is that I have absolutely no idea what the letters/tags mean.

I wonder whether there's an opportunity for some sort of 'art train' or 'grafitti carriage' to be commissioned? I guess that would only be seen to be encouraging vandalism.

The non-corporate thing is admittedly part of the appeal for me too... A friend of mine is into the culture of street art, and filled me in on how it works...

These appear to be elaborate tags- essentially "writers" (AIUI that's the term used in the community) marking territory, rather than a political statement. The tag is essentially a signature or calling-card, a "paint-name" if you will;). Often (but not exclusively) writers form crews and tag in groups, and larger displays such as these will likely have been the work of more than one individual.

Donating the Pacers to art colleges and community groups would be a fitting way to dispose of them- the Northern equivalent of the '83 Stock on the rooftops!
 

BestWestern

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The non-corporate thing is admittedly part of the appeal for me too... A friend of mine is into the culture of street art, and filled me in on how it works...

These appear to be elaborate tags- essentially "writers" (AIUI that's the term used in the community) marking territory, rather than a political statement. The tag is essentially a signature or calling-card, a "paint-name" if you will;). Often (but not exclusively) writers form crews and tag in groups, and larger displays such as these will likely have been the work of more than one individual.

Donating the Pacers to art colleges and community groups would be a fitting way to dispose of them- the Northern equivalent of the '83 Stock on the rooftops!

Fascinating as it may be to some, the rise of the term 'street art' and the attempts to add glamour to the subject are irritaring to those of us who appreciate that this is yobs vandalising other people's property, which other people then have to pay to rectify. I remain very firmly of the view that the punishment for these individuals should be a team attending their home and vandalising it, and leaving them to clean it up. There is a time and place for expressive 'art', and daubing it on other people's property is not it!
 

DarloRich

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Fascinating as it may be to some, the rise of the term 'street art' and the attempts to add glamour to the subject are irritaring to those of us who appreciate that this is yobs vandalising other people's property, which other people then have to pay to rectify. I remain very firmly of the view that the punishment for these individuals should be a team attending their home and vandalising it, and leaving them to clean it up. There is a time and place for expressive 'art', and daubing it on other people's property is not it!

I think the concept is certainly artistic - sticking it on other peoples property without permission is the problem!
 

BestWestern

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I think the concept is certainly artistic - sticking it on other peoples property without permission is the problem!

Perhaps, but it's a bit like someone scribbling the same doodling over and over again, isn't it. 'Graffiti' style writing with meaningless strings of letters, let's be honest it all looks the same just in different colours. A bit like a Ray Stenning livery! :D
 

BestWestern

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61653 HTAFC

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Fascinating as it may be to some, the rise of the term 'street art' and the attempts to add glamour to the subject are irritaring to those of us who appreciate that this is yobs vandalising other people's property, which other people then have to pay to rectify. I remain very firmly of the view that the punishment for these individuals should be a team attending their home and vandalising it, and leaving them to clean it up. There is a time and place for expressive 'art', and daubing it on other people's property is not it!

I think the concept is certainly artistic - sticking it on other peoples property without permission is the problem!

Most "writers" steer well clear of the railways, the risks of both arrest and of injury or worse are considered too high. Unlike in New York City or Berlin, tagging trains is the exception rather than the rule in the UK. For the most part, abandoned industrial buildings are the main targets. Obviously any of this activity is illegal, but in order to combat something like this, it helps to understand it.

In the UK the industry is far more vigilant with removing graffiti when it happens, a tagged train won't be in traffic until cleaned unless absolutely necessary. In the case of the Pacers (or indeed any stock scheduled for withdrawal in the next 2-3 years) I'd question the value of removing graffiti unless it's obscene or offensive.
 

BestWestern

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In the UK the industry is far more vigilant with removing graffiti when it happens, a tagged train won't be in traffic until cleaned unless absolutely necessary. In the case of the Pacers (or indeed any stock scheduled for withdrawal in the next 2-3 years) I'd question the value of removing graffiti unless it's obscene or offensive.

With respect, I think that fails to appreciate the problem. The 'reward' for the vandal (I'll refrain from using the terms 'writer' or 'artist', as these people are neither and it's insulting to those who are), is seeing their efforts on display to the world. The best way of dealing with graffiti is to remove it immediately. It doesn't matter if the affected rolling stock is due for withdrawal next year or next month, leaving it in service sends completely the wrong message and would serve only to encourage further damage to be carried out. The yobs have little interest or knowledge in what sort of train they are defacing, after all.
 
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