GWR Auto Trailer Operations

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RichmondCommu

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G'day everyone,

I've recently seen a picture of a GWR Pannier Tank sandwiched between two auto trailers either side of it on a Liskeard to Plymouth service so four auto trailers in total. What I can't understand is why it have been necessary to place two auto trailers either side of the loco instead of having all four auto trailers behind the loco.

Any ideas anyone?

Kind regards,

Richmond Commuter!
 
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neilb62

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I wouldn't fancy the chances of operating regulator rods etc over the length of four coaches.
 

randyrippley

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Someone stated on another recent thread that for safety reasons remote control was limited to two coaches.
 

theageofthetra

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Was control entirely mechanical like signalling rods or was some sort of steam/pneumatic control used?
 

neilb62

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The control was entirely mechanical as far as I am aware.

The Driver ( GWR system) could open and close the regulator and apply (but not release) the brake. The fireman on the loco had to be a 'passed man' (passed for driving) as he had to not only look after the fire and boiler level but also work the reverser to give the correct cut-off and release the brake using the ejectors. I'm told it could get quite busy.
 

RichmondCommu

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The Driver ( GWR system) could open and close the regulator and apply (but not release) the brake. The fireman on the loco had to be a 'passed man' (passed for driving) as he had to not only look after the fire and boiler level but also work the reverser to give the correct cut-off and release the brake using the ejectors. I'm told it could get quite busy.

Many thanks for the explanation :) Apologies in advance for the stupid question but what is the reason for the driver not being able to release the brake?
 
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neilb62

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The brake has to be 'blown off' using the vacuum ejector, this is steam operated and can only be worked from the footplate.


Sent from my iPhone using fat fingers and a squint.
 

Taunton

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It was a longstanding regulation (Board of Trade I think) that no more than 2 vehicles could be propelled. Having two each side was thus as much as could be managed under this. The LBSC overhead electrification with a middle power/luggage car, and two carriages each side, was another early example. It also drove the design of many modernisation plan emus as a 4-car unit with an intermediate power car, first seen on the Southend Class 307 in the early 1950s, which ran through to the 4-VEP era. It was the Bournemouth electrification design that had a lot of trials and eventually did away with the requirement.

There were a range of auto-train controls. The GWR one had mechanical links at underframe level with constant-velocity joints between the vehicles. There were other railway systems with external high level wires, or with piped vacuum controls.
 
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