Has the NRM finally lost the plot? (Spacecraft going on display)

Discussion in 'Railtours & Preservation' started by IanXC, 6 Dec 2017.

  1. Iskra

    Iskra Established Member

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    Exactly, NRM is just an introduction. If you want to know the intricacies and talk to the experts, you can visit one of the multitude of railways, sites or groups around the countries that specialise in that exact subject. If there isn't a group, there's probably a reason for that and if you really wanted, you could start one.
     
  2. mpthomson

    mpthomson Member

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    Most of the Explainers, wherever they come from, are volunteers....
     
  3. MarkyT

    MarkyT Established Member

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    Even a rail expert may not have a particularly broad knowledge, as among the ex professionals, detailed knowledge of technology in particular is often very compartmentalised according to department. An ex signaller or signal engineer might have very good information about token and tablet systems to recount to visitors, but good luck if you ask an ex PW man or ticket clerk about the same devices! They on the other hand might have entirely different but just as detailed knowledge about their own specialised fields.
     
  4. JamesGar

    JamesGar Member

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    Agreed!!! I live near the museum and went specifically to see the space capsule. I used there cafe, spending money I wouldn't of normally.
    The museum was busy with other visitors and a coach trip who had gone there because of the capsule, again people in there spending money, and also looking at and gaining knowledge of the trains there, that maybe wouldn't of, if the capsule was not there.

    I can't see the harm, only the benefits of having and allowing the capsule to be displayed there.
    Living in the area it is also, to me, brilliant that Shildon was chosen to display it, when there is so many other towns that it could of gone to.
     
  5. mushroomchow

    mushroomchow Member

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    You're all going to be looking back on this fondly when we've got trains on the moon harvesting space rocks. ;)
     
  6. mildertduck

    mildertduck Member

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    My partner took a group of young people (aged around 8) to the railway museum as a day out, on a Saturday, and struggled to find enough to keep them occupied.

    With the technology of today "looking at things" doesn't really inspire young people as much as it once did, it's activities which they're all after now. It would be nice if the NRM could have lots and lots of different activities (for instance, a demonstration of how locos were built in the 1800s, or an explainer showing the interesting bits of every locomotive) but obviously this isn't practical.

    I actually am starting to think that the best way to preserve this stuff is to get it working, and the NRM to buy a substantial bit of infrastructure akin to the NYMR to show this stuff. That's the way to get people interested. But that costs money. Which nobody has, sadly.
     
  7. mushroomchow

    mushroomchow Member

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    I would have said that in a few years time, the NRM collection will have direct access to an 18-mile line to stretch its legs on, but turns out the HLF have shafted the project.
     
  8. DarloRich

    DarloRich Veteran Member

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    some interesting quotes in that article such as:

    Figures show Since 2011 Leicester has been awarded just over £9 million from the HLF, compared to £25.5 million to Nottingham, almost £18 million to Lincoln and just over £13 million to Derby and Nottingham has had nearly three times as much HLF money as Leicester. Even little Derby has had half as much again as we have.

    blind men fighting over a comb.
     
  9. alexl92

    alexl92 Established Member

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    What an excellent suggestion. That would be a fascinating exhibit for all ages I think. I'm an enthusiast and visit the NRM a few times a year just to enjoy getting up close and personal to locomotives and stock, which are the real focus of my railway fascination. But even though I make sure I cover every inch of the museum, I find the Signalling display in the gallery above the workshop incredibly boring. I'd like to learn a bit more about signalling but it's just an overwhelming wall of text and images that don't all necesarily correspond to what's written nearby. It's not clear, or easy to tackle. There are a couple of 'interactive' items but they're more or less permanently faulty or just outright broken.

    Absolutely. I would appear to be approximately the same age as this poster! I've been similar places with kids in the recent past, and they want to press a button and see something happen like they do on an iPad but they don't want to know what they're actually seeing or how and why it works and/or is important. I think I was the same as a kid - my interest was railways, so in a museum that wasn't about railways or didn't contain anything railway-related (such as the media museum, which, with the exception of the green-screen flying carpet I found deathly boring), I just wanted to see what things did if I pressed/moved them. Didn't care what or why.

    I can see and understand the logic behind both sides of the argument, but I think this is more or less how I feel about it. It made sense to display it at the Bradford Museum as it's now 'Science and Media'. But surely if people from York wanted to see the capsule, they would just as easily have gone to Bradford to see it, just as anyone from Bradford who wishes to see 60103 in their region would be able travel to York. It's not really that far, even on public transport, and the only benefit to the museum is numbers through the door. If people were bothered about the railways, they'd come to the museum anyway.

    Is the fake Eurostar cab still there as well as the Eurostar power car? Surely now they've got the real thing, the mockup needs to go. It takes up a huge amount of space and I don't think it really has much effect.

    The biggest problem for me is the Station Hall. It doesn't quite work as either a recreation of a station OR an exhibition space. I think it's pretty naff now.
    In the past, to view the Royal Train vehicles you walked along a carpeted row with the stock either side, one row headed by the gleaming LMS 5000, with little video booths talking about the history and development of the RT and I think bunting or something overhead - combined with low lighting it gave you the impression you were really following in the footsteps of royals as you wandered down there. Now, whilst Gladstone is arguably an even more fitting locomotive, the rest is just three coaches with minimal explanation or focus.

    I think you could make it brilliant. You can appeal to the average punter not just with 'celebrity' locos but by invoking nostalgia; having a parcels-type train at one platform, an 'express'-type train at another and maybe a platform with the 2-BIL and a cosmetically restored first-gen DMU would show a realistic cross section of the traffic at a terminus through the years but with the effect of appealing to the average punters by recreating what they'd have known when they were younger. Last time I went with my Dad, he remembered EMUs similar to the 2-BIL and enjoyed sharing his memories of childhood even though he's no enthusiast.

    I'd personally love to see the 86 with the Mk2 pullman it currently sits with plus a MK3 SLEP open for visitors to walk through. But I don't think that would appeal to many others!

    Yep - I see this too. Took my dad to a gala a few years ago at a local railway celebrating a significant anniversary with a gala featuring engines with a lot of local history. Ended up feeling like we were the only two 'normal' people on the train and was rather put off by the lack of attention paid by some to their presentation and personal hygiene.
     
  10. nferguso

    nferguso Member

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    Dear God there a few members of the Preservation Taliban on this thread. Personally, I would step on the heads on people to get Tim Peake's capsule at Wirksworth. It would be a fantastic draw and then act as the perfect means to draw-in visitors to what else we have to offer.

    Oh and 87001? Just be grateful it's been preserved.
     
  11. backontrack

    backontrack Established Member

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    [​IMG]
    I have to agree with this too. Sometimes it's worth remembering that museums like the NRM are, above all, visitor attractions. They are not going to be kept alive solely by hardcore enthusiasts, but by families and people who love trains and other things.

    I hope that this spacecraft is welcomed with open arms to York.
    [​IMG]
     
  12. theblackwatch

    theblackwatch Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    I don't see the Spacecraft, which is clearly there for commercial reasons, as really being different to the York Eye, which was similarly located at the Museum a few years ago.
     
  13. E759

    E759 Member

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    Visited 8/2/2019 from opening at 10am to closing at 5pm. Thought it was fantastic. Want to go again as the "Room of Requirement" is amazing. And to think it all used to be hidden away where nobody can see!

    I rode the Mallard simulator and though it was great. I wasn't around in 1938 nor do I expect to be invited onto the footplate of Tornado so that's as close to high speed steam as I will get.

    Thought the Royal Train tour/talk was great. All the little anecdotes told and the evolution of the carriages explained.

    The use of wood on the footplate was mentioned to prevent burns. Also the heat of spacecraft on reentry being similar to that of superheated steam. This reminded me of Chinese spacecraft using oak heat shields at the fraction of the cost of composite ablative. At the end of that tour/talk I didn't feel at all sad that the MN will never run again.

    I asked a demonstrator how to get to the NYMR, bus from York or bus from Malton. She suggested driving... Apart from that, I was a very happy person and then topped it off with a couple of hours in the York Tap awaiting my Advance back to Kings Cross.
     
  14. HaggisBotherer

    HaggisBotherer Member

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    Here's an alternative experience...

    Recently I visited the exhibition about ocean liners at the V&A in Dundee. I was really looking forward to it, as it's a subject I have a real interest in. There were a lot of very nice and interesting 'glass case' exhibits with good text explanations, many artefacts from all the famous liners, classic promotional posters, photos, models and so on.

    But what was the exhibit I spent most time looking at? A huge video wall, on which was projected an oceanscape and CGI renditions of various liners sailing past. A wooden floor and deck rail were incorporated, so you could lean on the rail and, for a few minutes, imagine you were on the deck of a passing ship, watching these legendary liners go past. I found it utterly captivating.

    I'm just as much a part of the middle-aged nerdinista as many of those decrying the 'dumbing down' of the (N)RM here. However I find that, after a while, a lot of static exhibits all blur into one because... well... they don't do anything. Once I've seen 20 different historic chairs, outfits on mannequins or indeed bits of railwayana, the mind tends to stop remembering the 21st onwards.

    If static exhibits have that effect on me, at an exhibition that I was interested in and really wanted to see, they will surely have even more of an ossifying effect on a casual visitor to a museum, who is not at 'Nerd Factor 9' level in its particular subject?

    Me too.
     
    Last edited: 11 Feb 2019
  15. Tracked

    Tracked Member

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    442's hauled by 50's, or 142's?
     

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