Hidden disabilities

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Bayum, 28 May 2015.

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  1. Bayum

    Bayum Established Member

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    I'm sure many of you who have seen my posts in the past will know I'm quite open about my thoughts on the forums - I'll quite openly say that it upsets me that a lot of people on here would write horrible comments about suicide jumpers in fronts on trains for instance.

    I teach a year three class. I've also been very open with them and explained when we had transition days last year that I had an unseen disability. Much like you can't see people who have cancer are poorly until they're very very poorly sometimes. The children know that I get tired very easily and that I can't pick things up off the floor and are extremely understanding for such young people.

    However. I have come across in the past some less than understanding adults who might learn a thing or two from these children!

    Ironically, on a bus journey back from a talk on this exact subject I sat in a disabled seat. Fifteen minutes into the journey and someone with crutches jumps on. Ten minutes later I recieved a torrent of abuse for not giving up my seat and being demanded as to why I should stay sat down - to which I explained my circumstances and said person grew very red in the face and apologised profusely. They didn't ask the more adult looking person than I sat behind me or across from me may I add!

    I can completely understand the frustration this passenger may have had, I really do. But then I don't know if my open nature/attitude just allow e to recognise these things happen, you get shouted at - it's done.

    Have you ever been in my position? Or in a position where perhaps you've thought you deserve a disabled seat more than the person say there because of their potentially hidden disability? What did you do? What went through your mind?
     
  2. GaryMcEwan

    GaryMcEwan Member

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    Yeah I've been in that position before where I've had snide remarks made towards me, and they usually get a snide remark back and it usually shuts them up.

    If they really get on my nerves and it's quiet enough I ask them what qualifications they have to make those remarks...I don't get a response!
     
  3. Flamingo

    Flamingo Established Member

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    On the subject, I know that FGW will issue a card that says "I need a priority seat" or some such if one has a medical condition that might not be obvious, but means the holder would require a seat. Customer Services should be able to advice on how to get it. (I have to say, I've never seen one being used.)
     
  4. infobleep

    infobleep Established Member

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    I have had people tell me off for using accessibility loos or as I and probably many others call them, disabled loos.

    It doesn't happen that often thankfully as most public ones require the use of a key. Good job they do to.

    I decided that the next time some says anything, I'll just say to them, do you have to look disabled in order to be able to use this loo?

    I'm not disabled but I have one long term illness of several, that qualifies me to justify using such loos. I can use a standard loo if I had to but no doubt there are some disabled people who could stand for a short time if they had to. Doesn't mean they should always have to.

    I was once on a train where a lady had her dog on the seat. Normally one wouldn't get a seat on this train, it being the 7.17 from Guildford to London. I said politely could I sit there. The lady said do you mind not doing so as my dog is poorly. To which I replied actually I do as I have ankylosing spondylitis. I was then given the seat and the dog sat on her lap. As I left at Waterloo I thanked her.

    I could have stood for 40 minutes or changed trains at Woking as I often did to get the 7.29, which always had seats but why shouldn't I sit down instead of the dog if such a seat exists.
     
    Last edited: 29 May 2015
  5. alxndr

    alxndr Member

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    I'm usually perfectly able bodied, however towards the end of the year I'll be making a few hour journey the day after some surgery, and then there and back a week or so later for a check up. If it's crowded I'll probably not be up for standing, so I'm a little concerned about someone taking issue with me wanting to sit.

    Good job the general public doesn't know about getting the keys...
     
  6. Bletchleyite

    Bletchleyite Veteran Member

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    Wouldn't need to even consider it if this country wasn't so absolutely awful at providing sufficient public facilities for everyone.
     
  7. Antman

    Antman Established Member

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    I saw those cards advertised recently at a Southeastern station
    --- old post above --- --- new post below ---
    The person on the bus might have asked you politely rather than being rude and abusive but you make some good points, the DDA legislation has made bus travel far more difficult for many disabled people
     
  8. WelshBluebird

    WelshBluebird Established Member

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    Not experienced it msyelf as I am lucky enough not to have any conditions that would lead to it. However I know a couple of people my age (so young people) who have had various conditions (Leukemia being one, and in that case it was when she was having chemo) and have been spoken to very rudely by older people who automatically assumed that because they are young and look fine then they must be taking the mick by using the seats designated for the disabled / elderly.
     
    Last edited: 29 May 2015
  9. infobleep

    infobleep Established Member

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    Definitely!

    Oxford council unfortunately don't use the key system and in some parts lock their disabled toilets up by 5pm. Not helpful but as I don't leave there I've not complained.
    --- old post above --- --- new post below ---
    Perhaps they would like to have some Chemo. Not had it myself and I'd rather not.

    I once joked with a former work colleague that they would have a free two week trip to Bath. All they had to pay for was the rail fare there and back. The only catch is you have to have ankylosing spondylitis. They politely declined and we had a laugh about it.
     
  10. bignosemac

    bignosemac Established Member

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    Gateline staffer once said to me, "You don't look disabled", when I took some time finding my DSB Railcard to prove validity of my ticket.

    I replied, "You don't look like a doctor."
     
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