1. 125Group forum donation: see here!

Hornby 2019

Discussion in 'Modelling, Simulations & Games' started by Masboroughlad, 7 Jan 2019.

  1. Masboroughlad

    Masboroughlad Established Member

    Messages:
    1,424
    Joined:
    2 Mar 2011
    Location:
    Midlands
    Am I missing something with the prices of some of the 2019 Hornby range?

    A GWR train set at just over £100, when power car and dummy are £260 bought alone.

    Plenty of locos under 70 quid.

    It doesn't say they are Railroad range.

    I'm not complaining!
     
  2. Registered users do not see these banners - join or log in today!

    Rail Forums

     
  3. 43055

    43055 Member

    Messages:
    304
    Joined:
    8 Mar 2018
    It is certainly an interesting one but I haven't looked at it properly.

    I thing the GWR set looking at the box is the old power cars? as they have the old guards window at the rear of the power car.

    One thing that I am certainly looking forward to is the new mk3's with the power doors. Just don't know which livery to have yet though.
     
  4. AnthonyRail

    AnthonyRail Member

    Messages:
    718
    Joined:
    11 Jan 2015
    Are the power doors operational on the models?
     
  5. 43055

    43055 Member

    Messages:
    304
    Joined:
    8 Mar 2018
    No. It's just how I call the mk3s which have had all the mods done (gwr, scot rail and cross country)
     
  6. omnicity4659

    omnicity4659 Member

    Messages:
    12
    Joined:
    25 Sep 2017
    The GWR train set is indeed the older tooling, targeted at 'budget' or new modellers.

    The separate power cars and coaches are part of the 'premium' range.
     
  7. sprinterguy

    sprinterguy Established Member

    Messages:
    9,637
    Joined:
    4 Mar 2010
    Location:
    Macclesfield
    Primarily 0-4-0 and 0-6-0 steam outline models that have been part of the range for at least thirty years, so you'd hope they'd be comparatively cheap.

    I've been largely out of the model railway hobby for a few years now, but the disconnect between what I recall as typical prices for a new locomotive and the price they now retail for is astounding. Times move on but surely the price increase has far outstripped the rate of inflation. I tend to pick up occasional bits and pieces second hand from a certain leading online auction website, where prices tend to be in line with my expectations.

    Thanks for starting this thread: I don't do it often any more but it was nice to have my memory jogged and have a scroll through the Hornby range to see what they're up to these days.
    I didn't realise until you mentioned it that Hornby are producing those: Good to see that they're still blazing a trail when it comes to producing contemporary HST models, as they were the first to release a model of the Intercity 125 in 1977 and have done a good job of keeping up with developments ever since. I suspect that Hornby will achieve full production of theirs before Wabtec do with the real ones!

    I see that they've managed a basic error with their Railroad range Intercity 125 power cars though, numbered as 43001 and 43002: The former was never a production series power car! Given the attention to detail that the main range power door fitted HST coaches appear to have received (No more mucking about with catering vehicles with incorrect numbers of windows, or omitting 'difficult' vehicle types from the range), it's surprising to witness such a basic lack of research in the Railroad range.
     
    Last edited: 11 Jan 2019 at 10:08
  8. SCH117X

    SCH117X Member

    Messages:
    640
    Joined:
    27 Nov 2015
  9. trash80

    trash80 Established Member

    Messages:
    1,195
    Joined:
    18 Aug 2015
    Location:
    Birches Green
    I had a look in one of those historic cost comparators once, i remember a new Hornby Class 86 cost me (or rather my Mum as it was a present for passing my GCSEs!) 32 quid in 1988. 32 quid then is about 80 now so locos are more expensive though maybe not quite as much as your first think.

    For real expense model continental railways, my latest loco cost me 170!
     
  10. sprinterguy

    sprinterguy Established Member

    Messages:
    9,637
    Joined:
    4 Mar 2010
    Location:
    Macclesfield
    That seems more sensible. I know that Hornby have put a lot of detailing onto their Peckett tanks but £100 for an 0-4-0 seemed a bit crackers to me.
    Yeah, I suppose modern day prices don't seem so outlandish when compared against inflation, and new models typically come with a wealth of detail and level of accuracy that was lacking on the eighties standards.

    It always just takes my by surprise when I recall typical modern image diesel and electric locos selling for £40 - £45 in around 2000, when they often retail for double or even triple that now.
    Yes, the cost of continental models always seems astonishingly high compared to even the modern standards of the UK market.
     
    Last edited: 15 Jan 2019 at 16:29
  11. SCH117X

    SCH117X Member

    Messages:
    640
    Joined:
    27 Nov 2015
    The pricing problem is that UK modellers constantly want better detailed models but gripe like mad when the prices start to reflect better detailing.
     
  12. HaggisBotherer

    HaggisBotherer Member

    Messages:
    106
    Joined:
    25 Sep 2018
    Not to mention that the people in the Chinese factories that assemble them might want to be paid a reasonable wage!
     
  13. J-Rod

    J-Rod Member

    Messages:
    59
    Joined:
    9 Nov 2017
    Went back to a model shop the other day I'd not been to since I was a child and... because it also happened to be my birthday, bought a Hornby 4VEP for £125 (which seems very expensive to me...!). Anyway, it looked nice and had lights, curtains and all the other pretty bits... and also, birthday. Else I'd be on a Leading Auction Website, like Mr Sprinterguy up there, buying up stock from Best Intentions projects, or...whisper it... dead guys...

    Got it home, ran it... and it derailed over pretty much every bit of slightly imperfect trackwork and most pointwork.

    It's been returned.

    I'm not sure who these models are aimed at but from what I can see, unless it's an exhibition layout running in a more or less straight line from end to end, you can't even use these things (from what I could see, it's mostly due to the bogie design in conjunction with the couplings not allowing enough movement between the coaches). I have the same bogie problem with a rather nice Dapol 56 (which happened to be alot cheaper, so not too fussed) and a few Bachmann Mk2s when coupled.

    When I mentioned this while returning the 4VEP, chap who owned the shop agreed and said that he gets loads of returns for very similar reasons. So go figure...
     
  14. trash80

    trash80 Established Member

    Messages:
    1,195
    Joined:
    18 Aug 2015
    Location:
    Birches Green
    Yes i have a Dapol 122 that derails if run in one direction, the other direction its fine. You'd think basic stuff like coupling and bogies would be fine these days...
     
  15. Cowley

    Cowley Established Member

    Messages:
    5,230
    Joined:
    15 Apr 2016
    Location:
    Devon
    Especially at the prices asked.
     
  16. pdeaves

    pdeaves Established Member

    Messages:
    1,636
    Joined:
    14 Sep 2014
    Location:
    Gateway to the South West
    Believe it or not, it's probably too realistic. The curves and imperfections on a model track usually scale at something far, far in excess of what is permissible in real life. If the model has super fine flanges, limited bogie movement, etc., it will look the part but will suffer with typical model track.

    Those old Lima wheels were absolutely horrible but I found you couldn't derail them even on purpose!

    edit: added missing word
     
    Last edited: 15 Jan 2019 at 22:37
  17. Cowley

    Cowley Established Member

    Messages:
    5,230
    Joined:
    15 Apr 2016
    Location:
    Devon
    Very true. You need really good trackwork these days (which is an art form in itself), I find that 3rd radius curves as a minimum, with corresponding gently curved points are the only way to go with modern models.
    I also glue and weight the track down rather than pin it these days because even a slight distortion caused by tapping the pins in can cause problems.
     
  18. trainmania100

    trainmania100 Established Member

    Messages:
    1,407
    Joined:
    8 Nov 2015
    Location:
    Newhaven
    I've been put of off buying brand new models from Hornby. I accept that the level of detailing is mint, and internal complexity warrants the price, what with DCC etc, but the prices leave a big dent in my bank statement

    I personally feel that I have more problems with newer models than with older models. For example I bought a dapol GBRf 73 a year or so ago and it has problems on pointwork due to the bogie detailing catching on the bodywork. My bachmann 37 also details going left or right on a junction.

    I like the Hornby railroad range. Not due to their affordable prices, but due to their simplicity in detailing and reasonably good handling .I've had more problems with the expensive Hornby range than the cheaper Hornby range if I'm honest.
     
  19. J-Rod

    J-Rod Member

    Messages:
    59
    Joined:
    9 Nov 2017
    I'd agree about them being too realistic. If time (and money...and space) was no object, I'd probably work a spot harder on the trackwork etc., but I'm partly building the layout for my son, so I want to get all the big stuff done while he's tiny so he can enjoy it for most of his childhood (until he discovers better things to do with his time..!). I guess it's all about what you want to achieve from these things, hence my earlier comment about straight line exhibition layouts.

    Anyway, like I said in another thread, I'm more about the scenery (and also, concealing the corners so that it doesn't look like it's running round in circles).

    Agree about the Hornby Railroad products as well; they're the sort of things that the kids (or in my case, The Lad) can save up for, if they/he so wish[es]!
     
  20. Cowley

    Cowley Established Member

    Messages:
    5,230
    Joined:
    15 Apr 2016
    Location:
    Devon
    Must agree, Railroad stuff is pretty good, a lot of it is old Lima but with decent glazing, printing etc.
    The mechanisms are good too.
     
  21. sprinterguy

    sprinterguy Established Member

    Messages:
    9,637
    Joined:
    4 Mar 2010
    Location:
    Macclesfield
    I had a Dapol Pendolino back when they were newly released (Still do in fact, in a box under the spare bed) that used to consistently derail on one corner of my layout travelling in one direction only, no matter how gingerly I attempted to ease it over the offending turnout. It was hardly surprising to be honest, as the long and fairly stiff wheelbase wasn't fond of second radii curves and the slightly compromised curve radii that I had in place on that corner of the layout. That seems to me to be around the time that railway models began to move away from 'toy train' sensibilities with the ability to negotiate most set track curves within reason, and towards a greater degree of realism and cost, but with limitations on where you could run them.

    Lima models seemed to be practically bomb proof and could handle whatever you could throw at them while demonstrating quite a high level of bodywork detail for the time, I'd expect second hand examples to keep going for years to come.
    That's why I tend to stick to second hand purchases of generally slightly older models: I've no interest in masses of detailing, as long as it looks 'right' to me and captures the essence of the original then I'm quite happy.
     
  22. J-Rod

    J-Rod Member

    Messages:
    59
    Joined:
    9 Nov 2017
    This. Not to say I don't appreciate a nice spot of detail (!), I'd rather it not detract from the enjoyment of the thing (and being driven nuts by something hopping off the track every 5 seconds will do that, unsurprisingly!)

    As to the Railroad range, I always thought the Lima models were pretty good anyway, especially if you want to keep a small fleet of 31s and 33s without going bankrupt...
     
  23. Cowley

    Cowley Established Member

    Messages:
    5,230
    Joined:
    15 Apr 2016
    Location:
    Devon
    Very true. Many of the Lima models were pretty well proportioned and looked right (especially the 31, 37, 40, 47 and 73). The main problem with them was the fairly course motors.
    The nice about buying cheaper and simpler models is that you can add the odd bit of extra detail yourself or weather them without worrying too much about it.
     
  24. J-Rod

    J-Rod Member

    Messages:
    59
    Joined:
    9 Nov 2017
    Truth be told, I quite like a noisy motor...
     
  25. sprinterguy

    sprinterguy Established Member

    Messages:
    9,637
    Joined:
    4 Mar 2010
    Location:
    Macclesfield
    I always thought that my Lima Deltic sounded quite prototypical. :D I've always liked that coarse note that the Lima pancake motors had/have: Better than the anemic whine of the older Hornby Ringfields.
    I was a big fan of the Lima class 37s and 60s, and of course their 47 was streets ahead of the ancient Hornby moulding.
    Yes, I've always felt that this approach is beneficial: Produce the basic model to a good standard for a sensible price and those that want to can add extra detail to their hearts content.
     
    Last edited: 16 Jan 2019 at 16:31
  26. J-Rod

    J-Rod Member

    Messages:
    59
    Joined:
    9 Nov 2017
    Picked up an older Lima Western recently, which sounds like a beast. Pretty nice model too (and much better compared to the Hornby version of the same era, which arrived some time back).
     

Share This Page