How to perfectly cut railtracks?

Discussion in 'Infrastructure & Stations' started by djmk1988, 9 Jul 2018.

  1. djmk1988

    djmk1988 Member

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    Good evening buddies and hello to everyone.
    Quite new to this forum but been a railway passionate since I was a little boy, nice railway careers in my family as well :) . My hobby is locomotives, but I'm rejecting my dream to be a driver now as the work patterns won't suit me well - even though driving them massive machines feels like a hug from God himself. Recently started my PTS course which I more than enjoy and looking to make the best out of it and move up as much as I can. My experience on working on the railtrack is next to zero , however I'm more than interested to learn so will pay attention to what each of you has to say.
    The guy who's got me into this mentioned that cutting the railtrack is an art which only a few master it properly... at least in the begining. Must admit i've been using tools since I was about 11 (I'm 30 now ) including disk cutters, grinders, welding machines, drills etc etc- no accidents or mistakes what so ever as I tend to be very calculated and precaucious with what I do (I'm designing and servicing electronics of all kinds as a job ). However , would like to ask you guys what's the best way to do it - both quick and efficient, without grinding down the disc too much. I saw some clips on youtube and to my first impression I understood that what makes an actual diference is the way you swing the disc cutter while cutting the track. Again I might be (Very) wrong. And this is why I'm here. Not looking to demonstrate i'm a genious on the track but definetly want to learn and do my best and above all be well prepared. A lovely evening to you all,
    Mario Alex.
     
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  3. Boodiggy

    Boodiggy Member

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    Hi,
    It depends on what rail you need to cut.
    For stressed track the first cut needs to be a flame cut (done by welders usually) and any disc cutting can be done once you pass the training course - and like anything it takes a bit of practice to master it...

    Rail also comes in varoius grades and profiles.
     
    Last edited: 10 Jul 2018
  4. AndrewE

    AndrewE Established Member

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    A PWay specialist will be able to correct this if I am wrong, but I think most discs (resin-bound ones anyway) are designed to wear away so that fresh cutting grit is always presented to the work. You use them until they get too small (and the actual speed of the disc edge against the work drops too low) then you change them. Special ones (diamond-impregnated or whatever) might go on for ever, but probably need to be used more carefully, with coolant or whatever.
     
  5. civ-eng-jim

    civ-eng-jim Member

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  6. Joseph_Locke

    Joseph_Locke Established Member

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    Once you get your head round the size of the disc ...
     
  7. Robvdub73

    Robvdub73 New Member

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    I've been on the railway now for 19yes as a track welder and we have to use a mounted rail saw for cutting rail or I use oxy-propane cutting head and a cutting guide. the best cut comes from a new blade as it cuts it wears down and if you push down on the saw to hard it glazes the blade and wont cut properly
     
  8. civ-eng-jim

    civ-eng-jim Member

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    Ah - one question you might be able to answer Robvdub73. When welding up an S&C layout or plain line panels, do you cut a bit of the end of each rail off on each panel to cater for the weld size? So if you were to weld up 60ft panels and didn't cut the ends, eventually over a number of panels it could lead to critical track features being out of position.
     
  9. Robvdub73

    Robvdub73 New Member

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    hi when the panels go in they go in the end to end and when we come to weld them we have to cut a gap to weld as with most projects and renewal sites we have to cut gaps as its safe as sometimes the engineers make the gaps too big and then you have an issue
     

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