How to pronounce 'Claughton'?

contrex

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It's been bugging me on-and-off for 60 years. Is it Clafton or Clawton or something else? I mean the LNWR locos built from 1913 onwards, the first of which was named after Sir Gilbert Claughton, chairman of the railway at that time.
 
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Gloster

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I have always thought it was Claw-ton. However, the two villages in Lancashire have different pronunciations. The place on Merseyside appears to have another pronunciation.
 

Djgr

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I have always thought it was Claw-ton. However, the two villages in Lancashire have different pronunciations. The place on Merseyside appears to have another pronunciation.
Claughton village in Birkenhead is Claw-ton.
 

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kermit

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Claw-ton, according to my long-departed uncle, who spotted them in his youth, a very long time ago!
 

6Gman

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I've known two LNWR experts in my time.

Both said Claw - ton.
 

geoffk

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Slightly on the same subject, Maunsell is of course pronounced Man-sell.
 

contrex

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Slightly on the same subject, Maunsell is of course pronounced Man-sell.
And the motive power and carriages designed under his successor were not, as far as I know, bullied, as often seems to be suggested.
 

Djgr

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The Claw-ton Hotel
 

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webbfan

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Have always assumed it to be clawton but checked with the expert Ted Talbot who replied "..it is as you say – Clawton. As the stress is on the first syllable the second syllable is unstressed as in Nuneaton, cotton and dozens of other words."
 

DerekC

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Claughtons were one of my dad's favourite locomotives in the 1920s - I can recall him looking through my 1959 spotters book and being quite upset that they had all been scrapped. He pronounced it "claw-tun".

Edit: on looking them up I see that one (6004) survived until 1949. Pity it wasn't preserved, although by all accounts they weren't a very good design.
 

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