Idea to stop bridge strikes

Discussion in 'Infrastructure & Stations' started by Y Ddraig Coch, 15 May 2015.

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  1. Y Ddraig Coch

    Y Ddraig Coch Member

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    Ok, so today I was reading another article (link below) about a articulated lorry hitting a rail bridge in North Wales, causing massive disruption to road users who were forced on a huge detour and to rail users who were disrupted while checks made to integrity of the bridge by NR engineers.

    http://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/north-wales-news/porthmadog-councillor-urges-drivers-observe-9266250

    There seem to be quite a few bridge strikes every year, even a low impact strike can cause massive disruption which obviously leads to substantial cost with all the implications. Delays, rail replacement and other such costs.

    My idea is and I am ready to be shot down in flames if it is not practical is why not put a frame either side of a railway bridge a 100 yds before the bridge or less if there is a road junction closer, by frame I mean something similar to what you go under driving into a multi story or car park with height restriction and have it set for the height of the bridge ahead.

    By doing this if a lorry or any other vehicle for that matter was too high for the bridge it would hit the frame hopefully ensuring the driver realised before striking the actual bridge and causing less disruption and associated costs.

    The savings from disruption of a bridge strike would surely be high enough to cover the cost of installing these frames?

    Sensible? Madness? Impractical? Thoughts please
     
  2. najaB

    najaB Veteran Member

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    For possibly the first time ever, our cousins across the pond have a more simple solution:
     

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  3. lincolnshire

    lincolnshire Member

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    Already quite a few with a very large solid steel girder placed before the actual bridge so that the lorry hits it first.

    Also ones with with dangling rods to hit the top of lorry, like the bells at crossings where overhead electrified lines are but a bit more heavier that bells.

    Also ones where there is a light beam across the road at the bridge height well before the bridge and a very large sign that lights up with a warning of danger low bridge ahead, usually just after a junction with the alternative route for vehicles above the said bridge height should have gone.

    Still does,t stop them

    Some are fitted with detectors to show if they have moved after been hit etc and see all the details into someone. One near Thorne North Station fitted with said equipment.
     
  4. Y Ddraig Coch

    Y Ddraig Coch Member

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    Ha ha, who'd have thought they would have a sensible idea!! Pretty much what I was thinking. Bizarre something like this isn't in place. The hassle and disruption of a strike however minor is huge.
    --- old post above --- --- new post below ---
    Ok so it has been thought about and some ideas implemented.
    I'm not sure if I just have never noticed or have never actually come across any of the preventative measures you mention then.

    Interesting.
     
  5. Iskra

    Iskra Established Member

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    They're actually pretty good when it comes to driving; turning right at red traffic lights if its clear and separate lanes and speed limits for HGV's/vehicles that are towing are all great ideas.
     
  6. redbutton

    redbutton Member

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    Here's a famous one where they have all of the above, and still it gets hit multiple times a week.

    It gets hit so often, a local resident set up CCTV cameras at multiple angles and showcases the videos on a website.

    http://11foot8.com/
     
  7. broadbander

    broadbander Member

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    The Australians had a similar problem with trucks and tunnels, so they implemented this...

    [youtube]Dk9DjO-_rT8[/youtube]
     
  8. Bald Rick

    Bald Rick Established Member

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    They are absolutely not good when it comes to driving. Signage is variable, road sense is minimal, and courtesy to other drivers non existent.

    And then they do bizarre things like have crossroads where all four approaches have a mandatory stop, and no one knows who has prority. Or (as I experienced yesterday) have no warning about roadworks whatsoever, until you round a bend on a dual carriageway at 60mph and find a temporary 'Lane closed, merge left' sign positioned 1 foot in front of the cones closing the lane, with surveyors a further 1 foot behind the cones.

    In 27 years of driving on UK motorways extensively I have witnessed 1 traffic accident as it occurred (as opposed to the aftermath). In 14 days on the US interstates travelling 500 miles total I have witnessed 2, one of which I would have been part of had I not seen it developing in the mirrors and thus getting out of the way. Unlike the bloke immediately next to me who was in his own little bubble and thus got side swiped. And then parked on half in the outside lane, half on the Central reservation to check the damage. And then undertook me 10 minutes later whilst on his mobile phone.
     
    Last edited: 15 May 2015
  9. LateThanNever

    LateThanNever Established Member

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    Quite! The USA has a very poor - and much worse than the UK - road death rate. There is little - if anything - they can teach us...
     
  10. Mojo

    Mojo Administrator Staff Member Administrator

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    Not very pedestrian-friendly though.
     
  11. Bletchleyite

    Bletchleyite Veteran Member

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    4-way stops are weird. We should sell them mini roundabouts instead, at least the priority on those is clear (unless 3 or 4 cars arrive at exactly the same second, in which case it's time for an English politeness argument - you first, no you, no I insist you :) )
     
  12. redbutton

    redbutton Member

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    A four-way stop is first-come-first-go, and priority to the right in case of a tie.
     
  13. Bald Rick

    Bald Rick Established Member

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    What about a 4 way tie? Had one of those on Wednesday. The other three clearly didn't have a clue so I went first. I think the other three are still there.
     
  14. edwin_m

    edwin_m Established Member

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    4-way stops actually fit quite well with the suggestion in some quarters that all indications priority should be removed so everyone is on the alert and behaves accordingly. Not sure I buy this myself.
     
  15. GB

    GB Established Member

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    I'll give you right on a red, it does help keep traffic flowing as does being able to pass on both sides on freeways (though you need to be extra vigilant), but my experience has been pretty much on par with Bald Rick.

    Trucks don't seem to have any speed limits and often go faster than the cars, lanes merge out of now where and disappear just as quick, signage is totally lacking and dual carriage ways often don't have any crash barriers even if there is a 50ft+ drop next to you.

    Our roads and road etiquette are state of the art in comparision.
     
  16. jcollins

    jcollins Veteran Member

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    Indeed. I've not experienced it in the USA but they have the same law in other countries and to get across the road you basically have to walk out and hope the cars stop to give way, if you remain on the pavement they don't give way.

    We have left hand filters on some traffic lights where there's a pedestrian crossing on the side road and if no-one's waiting to cross the cars get an extra turn - that works much better.
     
    Last edited: 16 May 2015
  17. redbutton

    redbutton Member

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    Vehicles going straight have priority over those who are turning, and right turns go before left turns. But if you're all going straight then someone just has to creep forward and see what happens.

    Once there are three cars left then everyone can yield to the right.

    As for pedestrians, they usually have right-of-way at controlled (signalled or stop-signed) junctions regardless of road markings. So when you stop at the aforementioned four-way stop, make sure nobody is waiting to cross before you go.
     
  18. L&Y Robert

    L&Y Robert Member

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    The Botley Road bridge in Oxford had (years ago) a photo-electric device on the road approaches to, and some distance from the bridge. If the beam was interrupted, the flashing lights started and the stop signs lit up. I dunno if it's still there. There was also a level crossing immediately south of the bridge which could be used by high vehicles under supervision of railway staff. Don't thnik that's still there though.
    --- old post above --- --- new post below ---
    Railway Forum you know!
     
  19. Bald Rick

    Bald Rick Established Member

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    Not much use when the car at the front isn't turning right. Which seemed to happen to me on almost every occasion there wasn't a separate right turn lane.
     
  20. Phil from Mon

    Phil from Mon Member

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    When I used to work in Spain cars would almost never stop for pedestrians. The best way to get across a busy road was to wait for a nun (plenty of those in the early 90s) or a mother and baby - as soon as either appeared cars would screech to a halt and everybody could cross.
     
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