Irish passport eligibilty

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Calum1, 14 Dec 2018.

  1. Calum1

    Calum1 New Member

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    My dad can get an Irish passport as his grandad was Irish. If he gets one does that make me eligible?
     
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  3. swt class 450

    swt class 450 Guest

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    Yes indeed. You can get Irish citizenship as long as at least one parent or one grandparent is an Irish citizen. You can apply as soon as he has applied and been granted Irish citizenship. You must wait until he has been granted it before applying for yourself. So yes will indeed be eligible for it once he claims it for himself.
     
  4. XDM

    XDM Member

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    Not sure how user1234's advice squares with this.

    A friend & her sister, British citizens, have both just acquired Irish citizenship/passports because their mother's father was born in Sligo.

    But the older sister had a 2 year old daughter born before her mother, my friend, was granted the Irish Citizenship.

    She has been told the toddler is not eligible for an Irish passport. She has double checked but had it confirmed.

    Is is it correct that the child of an Irish citizen is NOT Irish if they were born after the parent got dual UK/ Irish citizenship?

    I hope to be able to cheer her up with some new facts.
     
  5. Billy A

    Billy A Member

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    It may, but it's complicated. If you have an Irish born parent or grandparent (citizenship isn't enough) you qualify for citizenship as of right. If you have an Irish born great grandparent as in your case:
    To become an Irish citizen, your great-grandparent's grandchild (ie your parent) who is of Irish descent must have registered in the Foreign Births Register between the years 1956 and 1986, or if you were born after 1986 they registered before you were born. The Foreign Births Register is managed by the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade.
    More here:
    http://www.inis.gov.ie/en/INIS/Pages/citizenship-by-birth-descent
     
  6. Busaholic

    Busaholic Established Member

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    A related question.

    My wife has recently discovered an Irish-born grandmother in her researches into family history: this was news to her. The question then is, assuming she can prove this and obtain an Irish passport, can I, her husband, with no such descendant get one too? This could well become more than academic to us!
     
  7. Billy A

    Billy A Member

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    Not as of right, no. You have to apply for naturalisation, although in the event of having a spouse who is a citizen the residence requirements are relaxed somewhat.
    http://www.citizensinformation.ie/en/moving_country/irish_citizenship/becoming_an_irish_citizen_through_marriage.html
     
  8. Billy A

    Billy A Member

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    The situation with respect to children born in Ireland of non-national parents was changed by constitutional referendum some time ago. The current position is here: http://www.inis.gov.ie/en/INIS/Pages/citizenship-by-birth-descent
     
  9. Ken H

    Ken H Established Member

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    does having a 'foreign' passport also carry responsibilities, like tax liabilities and possibility of conscription?
     
  10. krus_aragon

    krus_aragon Established Member

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    This depends on which foreign nation it is. As an example, the USA considers all its overseas citizens liable for US income tax (iirc), but Ottawa's never come asking for me for money because of my Canadian passport.
     
  11. furnessvale

    furnessvale Established Member

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    I certainly wouldn't worry about being conscripted into an Irish army. It seems to keep well out of the way when it matters.
     
  12. Howardh

    Howardh Established Member

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    On a similar point; I think I've asked this before - if there was a vote and Norn decided to re-unite with Ireland, if someone from GB goes and rents a house in the north before they rejoin, would they then automatically be entitled to swap their NI?GB passport for an Irish one, even if there's no family history? Also if Scotland became independent?
     
  13. Mag_seven

    Mag_seven Established Member

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    Its must great to be able to claim eligibility for an Irish passport and keep your European citizenship. I am not eligible and therefore I am having my European citizenship stolen from me. :(
     
  14. Senex

    Senex Established Member

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    Mine gets stolen too as my Irish ancestor is one generation too far back. Might Ireland one day feel even more generous and extend its offer of nationality by a further generation when it sees the total mess that the English (term used advisedly) have created for themselves?
     
  15. chorleyjeff

    chorleyjeff Member

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    If you want to become a non UK Citizen just emigrate and apply for citizenship. Plenty of people come here and get citizenship.
    When we leave the EU and some time later are prospering no doubt you will want to reactivate your UK citizenship ?
     
  16. Ken H

    Ken H Established Member

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    You can't un-british yourself. If you were born here (or one of your parents were british) you can always have a UK passport. Signing some document outside the UK will have zero effect on that.
     
  17. Mag_seven

    Mag_seven Established Member

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    But we've had freedom of movement taken from us as well!
     
  18. mafeu

    mafeu Member

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    I’m curious as to what a prosperous UK outside the EU looks like? I was so concerned about an inward looking, week and wobbly UK, that in 2016 I applied for my Irish passport (plus the quite handy Passport Card).

    Sure, we’ll control our borders, so we’ll be able to introduce bureaucracy to who we allow through the door. Don’t fret though as the queues won’t be long. Economic migrants will just go to a different state.

    We’ll strike trade deals throughout the world. The US meat industry is already knocking and offering free samples of chlorinated chicken.

    Most importantly, the fishermen will take back control of the waters. Don’t worry, they’ll be cautious not to fish stocks to oblivion. They promise.

    Meanwhile Scotland will decide to unilaterally secede from the UK once the impact post exit is felt by it’s populace.
     
    Last edited: 16 Dec 2018
  19. radamfi

    radamfi Established Member

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    Where's the evidence that Britain will prosper in the future? For example, Britain has proved itself incapable at public transport integration over many decades. The only way to get it is to leave the UK.
     
  20. DynamicSpirit

    DynamicSpirit Established Member

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    Not for moving to Ireland. Freedom of movement between the UK and Ireland for British and Irish citizens is because of a separate agreement between Britain and Ireland, which I believe pre-dates the EU and has nothing to do with our EU membership. Brexit shouldn't impact that.
     
  21. radamfi

    radamfi Established Member

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    The main reason for acquiring Irish citizenship is so you can keep your freedom of movement to go to other EU/EEA countries. If you only want to go to Ireland then you only need British citizenship.
     
  22. Mag_seven

    Mag_seven Established Member

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    I was referring to "emigrating" to Europe generally which we won't be able to do post Brexit.
     
  23. Ken H

    Ken H Established Member

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    yes you will. you will just have to fulfil conditions and do the paperwork. same as people did before FOM.
     
  24. Howardh

    Howardh Established Member

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    Out of interest, how many applications do you think will be rejected?
     
  25. radamfi

    radamfi Established Member

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    What is the relevance of what happened before FOM? Immigration is now far more strict than it was then.
     
  26. DynamicSpirit

    DynamicSpirit Established Member

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    Yes, and the 'fulfilling the conditions' is the key bit there. We don't yet know what the conditions will be, but it's a pretty safe bet that not everyone will be able to fulfill them, and therefore some people will be denied the freedom to emigrate to Europe.
     
  27. bignosemac

    bignosemac Established Member

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    That's what I'm hoping for. I'm a Scot on my father's side. A Scottish passport and EU citizenship would be perfect.
     
  28. radamfi

    radamfi Established Member

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    Given that Scottish nationality does not exist at the moment, I would guess that any British citizen living in Scotland at the time of independence could apply for Scottish nationality.
     
  29. berneyarms

    berneyarms Established Member

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    That last comment is rather offensive to the members of the Irish defence forces who have taken part in numerous UN mandated peace keeping missions.

    In particular they have served for over 40 years in Lebanon, and have suffered over 80 casualties on various missions. The naval service recently performed several humanitarian missions in the Mediterranean.

    But clearly that doesn’t “matter” in your view.

    You are however right to say that conscription in Ireland is not likely, bearing in mind that Ireland is a neutral country militarily.
     
  30. Journeyman

    Journeyman Established Member

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    No. I recently got one through my granddad being born in Dublin, but my kids aren't eligible. You can only pass it on if you acquire it before your kids are born.
     
  31. Journeyman

    Journeyman Established Member

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    No, not if you're already married. I acquired citizenship and passport recently, but can't pass it on to my wife and kids. If I were to re-marry and have more kids, I could pass it on to them.
     

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