Left Season Ticket at home

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Haitch

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Hi, so here is the situation.

Just gone to get some lunch and note that I have left my suit jacket in car at Kelvedon station. Unfortunatley my wallet and annual season ticket are in my inside pocket.

I did not need to show my ticket on my journey to Chelmsford this morning as no barriers at either station.

Now I am stuck in Chelmsford with no ticket or money or ID etc...

What advice would you offer me in as much as how do I get home... could probably board train and go unchecked this evening but not sure what would happen if get confronted by Revenue Protection.

Thanks
 
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Bletchleyite

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If there is someone at home, and your local station at home has a ticket office, you can have an Anytime Single paid for remotely plus £10 admin fee. Though some ticket offices probably don't know how it is done!

Otherwise, you will have to borrow money from someone at work - perhaps someone would agree that if you used your online banking to BACS them £100 they would draw it out for you, provided you don't need a physical device to do that as some banks do?

If you board a train without your ticket, you may be prosecuted (a Penalty Fare is often only issued if you can pay at least the Anytime Single fare on the spot). The offence is still committed even if you have a ticket at home - the law is that you must have a ticket with you when travelling. We therefore cannot advise you to take that action.
--- old post above --- --- new post below ---
Another option, as it's a relatively short journey, if you know your credit card number and 3-digit code off the back (I use mine so much I have committed it to memory) and have your phone with you, you could find a local taxi firm who use an app for booking and will take card payment via the app instead of cash.

Or indeed, if you are confident enough your car won't have been broken into to nick your wallet (i.e. it won't be visible), and there's certainly enough cash in it, you could take a taxi to your car and pay for it on arrival. But beware that taking a taxi without a means of payment is also an offence, so you could find yourself in trouble when you arrive at your car if it has indeed been nicked.
 
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gray1404

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I am sure I have read on here that if a season ticket holder forgots their ticket they may be able to have a PF cancelled up to twice within a year.
 

najaB

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I am sure I have read on here that if a season ticket holder forgots their ticket they may be able to have a PF cancelled up to twice within a year.
The key word being "may" - it's not guaranteed.
 

Haywain

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You could borrow a tenner from a colleague, go to the ticket office at Chelmsford and buy a ticket. You will be able to get a refund for it tomorrow when you present the ticket alongside your season ticket (or while you are getting a duplicate because your current one has been stolen, which hopefully won't be the case).
 

Bletchleyite

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The key word being "may" - it's not guaranteed.

A PF is often not issued if a passenger does not have *any* money on them. At some TOCs it is only issued, rather than reported for prosecution, if the passenger is able to pay the Anytime Single on the spot.

I agree borrowing money from a colleague, if one is so amenable, is the easiest way out of something like this.
 

gray1404

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I read a case on here on which a passenger with LM forgot their season ticket and was issued with a PF, however, no payment taken and then it was cancelled once a copy of the season ticket was sent in to the appeals address. But I do admit the policy changes by TOC.
 

jopsuk

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Be interested which solution was used? I'd certainly have gone for the short term loan from colleague as preference.
 

Bletchleyite

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As would I. It's a shame most banks now require you to use your card in a PIN pad to effect a "faster payments" BACS transfer - the "get out" used to be "I'll BACS you 100 quid, can you draw it out for me?"
 
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Haitch

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Thanks for all the replies.

The option I went for was to run the risk of an awkward conversation with ticket inspector.

On the basis that I have my ticket checked on 1 in 100 journeys, I was willing to take the chance.

Whilst it was officialy the wrong thing to do, and I am not recommending or condning my course of action, it was the simplest and most pragmatic in my opinion.

My moral compass is clean as I know I have a ticket and could have evidenced that on arrival at my destination to station staff if necessary.
 

maniacmartin

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Do they? Lloyds Banking Group members don't. It's optional for Barclays.

Most banks require the hardware, especially so if paying someone you haven't paid before.

My colleagues would trust me enough to just get paid back the next day though.
 

najaB

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Most banks require the hardware, especially so if paying someone you haven't paid before.
That's interesting. As I said, Lloyds Banking Group don't (you just need your mobile) as do Santander, and it's an optional upgrade with Barclays.
 

island

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As would I. It's a shame most banks now require you to use your card in a PIN pad to effect a "faster payments" BACS transfer - the "get out" used to be "I'll BACS you 100 quid, can you draw it out for me?"

Most banks require the hardware, especially so if paying someone you haven't paid before.

My colleagues would trust me enough to just get paid back the next day though.

Most banks don't, and instead send a code/make an automated call to your registered phone number or require you to authorise the payment in their app which is tied to your specific phone.
 

maniacmartin

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Mine still requires one of those stupid PIN pads. I wish it was an RSA SecurID instead, that could go on my keyring.

I'm the opposite. I like the pin pad as I can have one pin pad at home, one living in my bag and one at work. (As far as I know they are all interoperable and you can get a second one from the bank or borrow a colleague's - except perhaps Barclays'?). More stuff on my keyring jabbing into my leg doesn't appeal to me
 

najaB

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I prefer the system that Lloyds Banking Group use - one time password/PIN to a registered phone number. You're having a very bad day if the crooks steal your phone *and* figure out your login credentials.
 

talldave

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I'm the opposite. I like the pin pad as I can have one pin pad at home, one living in my bag and one at work. (As far as I know they are all interoperable and you can get a second one from the bank or borrow a colleague's - except perhaps Barclays'?). More stuff on my keyring jabbing into my leg doesn't appeal to me

Barclays pin pads are interoperable - they use them in branch too. I also changed the batteries in mine when it died and its carried on happily. With Barclays you can also use their banking app in place of the pin pad for login validation - I'm not sure if payment authorisation is also possible via the app though.
 

najaB

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I prefer the system that Lloyds Banking Group use - one time password/PIN to a registered phone number. You're having a very bad day if the crooks steal your phone *and* figure out your login credentials.
Just realised I wrote this the wrong way around - the PIN is generated on the website and then you choose which of your registered phones you want to receive the authorisation call on. You can't use a phone number that was changed in the last (I think) week, so little risk that the bad guys will change it to one of their choosing.
 

island

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I prefer the system that Lloyds Banking Group use - one time password/PIN to a registered phone number. You're having a very bad day if the crooks steal your phone *and* figure out your login credentials.
An issue that's been arising lately is crooks convincing phone companies that they're you and have lost your SIM and would they please change your number onto this new SIM.
 

najaB

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An issue that's been arising lately is crooks convincing phone companies that they're you and have lost your SIM and would they please change your number onto this new SIM.
That is the result of lax security by mobile phone providers and has wider impact than just online banking. It's easily detected though because the original SIM will stop working before the new one can be activated - it also doesn't leave a particularly wide window for a successful online banking transfer.
 
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