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Lincoln High Street Footbridge & Lifts.

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lincolnshire

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Any one know when the new footbridge and lifts across Lincoln High Stree will be totally finished?

The steps are now open , but the lifts are not working as yet and there is still a lot to finnish off yet in the surrounding area,s and buildings.

Not bad going as it was supposed to have been open last Christmas I thought I had read somewhere, just running a little late its a good job trains don,t run that late. So how much would 6 months on train delays be, they should be charging the contractors who are building it.
 
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lincolnshire

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I am sure they are, as long as the builders are liable.

So Network Rail should make sure they don,t use them contractors again for any other jobs then. Who in Network Rail is looking after the job then and is his superior taking action to make sure the job gets finished with in the time scales in the agreed schedule of works.
 

DarloRich

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So Network Rail should make sure they don,t use them contractors again for any other jobs then. Who in Network Rail is looking after the job then and is his superior taking action to make sure the job gets finished with in the time scales in the agreed schedule of works.

Here we go again :roll:.

That idea far too simplistic, as anyone with any knowledge of project delivery would point out.
 

PHILIPE

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Any one know when the new footbridge and lifts across Lincoln High Stree will be totally finished?

The steps are now open , but the lifts are not working as yet and there is still a lot to finnish off yet in the surrounding area,s and buildings.

Not bad going as it was supposed to have been open last Christmas I thought I had read somewhere, just running a little late its a good job trains don,t run that late. So how much would 6 months on train delays be, they should be charging the contractors who are building it.

When lifts were installed at Hereford last year, it was months before they were operative. Each time Network Rail were contacted re the delay, they kept saying that they were still undergoing testing.
 

DarloRich

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When lifts were installed at Hereford last year, it was months before they were operative. Each time Network Rail were contacted re the delay, they kept saying that they were still undergoing testing.

because ,of course, there wouldn't be a fault free running period built into the contract now would there?

(leaving aside the fact the product might be poor)
 

lincolnshire

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When lifts were installed at Hereford last year, it was months before they were operative. Each time Network Rail were contacted re the delay, they kept saying that they were still undergoing testing.

When lifts was installed on the station at Lincoln the other year or two ago for access to the far platforms they was running off a generator for quite a long time yet another good pre planning before starting the job. You would have thought someone in the initial plan before going out to tender would have thought about seeing if the electric supply was up to the job.

Please don,t forget we must not upset certain people on here who think they are the chiefs at Network Rail and have an answer of everything.
 

DarloRich

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When lifts was installed on the station at Lincoln the other year or two ago for access to the far platforms they was running off a generator for quite a long time yet another good pre planning before starting the job. You would have thought someone in the initial plan before going out to tender would have thought about seeing if the electric supply was up to the job.

Please don,t forget we must not upset certain people on here who think they are the chiefs at Network Rail and have an answer of everything.

Your posting is barely legible but I think I get the gist. I don't ( unlike you) pretend to be an expert in everything, particularly those things I know nothing about. However I do know a little about project delivery. Whilst I know that trying to discuss anything with you that doesn't fit into your own narrow frame of mind is a waste of time other people who read the board may be able to grasp some fairly simple concepts.

You assume that there is a conspiracy of incompetence in everything you see. Other people might consider why delivery changes during a project life cycle. You seem to assume that it is impossible for their to be a justifiable reason for a project to change delivery timescales. I can think of some very obvious ones:
  • budget changes
  • priority changes
  • conflicts with other projects
  • lack of available possessions
  • possessions cancelled or rearranged
  • reduced/reassigned resources
  • scope changes/scope reduction
etc etc etc

If you are that concerned contact your MP and Councillors and ask them to investigate.
 
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lincolnshire

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Your posting is barely legible but I think I get the gist. I don't ( unlike you) pretend to be an expert in everything, particularly those things I know nothing about. However I do know a little about project delivery. Whilst I know that trying to discuss anything with you that doesn't fit into your own narrow frame of mind is a waste of time other people who read the board may be able to grasp some fairly simple concepts.

You assume that there is a conspiracy of incompetence in everything you see. Other people might consider why delivery changes during a project life cycle. You seem to assume that it is impossible for their to be a justifiable reason for a project to change delivery timescales. I can think of some very obvious ones:
  • budget changes
  • priority changes
  • conflicts with other projects
  • lack of available possessions
  • possessions cancelled or rearranged
  • reduced/reassigned resources
  • scope changes/scope reduction
etc etc etc

If you are that concerned contact your MP and Councillors and ask them to investigate.

Always an answer for everything, are you sure your not an expert?

If its not what you like you have to try and put people down get a life.
 

DarloRich

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Always an answer for everything, are you sure your not an expert?

If its not what you like you have to try and put people down get a life.

You are right: I am an expert at this, unlike you. I note there is no response to reasonable points challenging your view.

You could be right. The project may be being delivered incompetently. However, I was simply pointing out there could be any number of reasons for change during the lifetime of a project. It appears you are unwilling to consider them.
 
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desmo

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As I remember from the local press, an adjacent building that was due to be partially knocked down was found to have asbestos in it which delayed the project whilst this was overcome.
 

AM9

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i would ;)

It does seem like the complaints are quite similar - That it is too much trouble to use the steps.

Then they obviously didn't mind waiting before, - it was just another whinge. They'll get over it so NR should just ignore them, (and increase gate safety periods to benefit from the £12m).
 

Lincoln

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I'd hazard a guess that those who complained about waiting are now quietly going about their business and using the new bridge if the barriers are down.

What's left are those who are not in a hurry and lazy people (plus people who can't use the steps waiting for the lifts to be commissioned).

The lazy people are now providing the negative sound bites, as we can't possibly have media report something in a positive light when it comes to Railways!

Personally I think it's great now it has been opened and will be even better once it's been tidied up.

Plus unlike the other cheap bridge fitted before, there's little chance of this one being torn down in the future for whatever reason.
 

AM9

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I'd hazard a guess that those who complained about waiting are now quietly going about their business and using the new bridge if the barriers are down.

What's left are those who are not in a hurry and lazy people (plus people who can't use the steps waiting for the lifts to be commissioned).

The lazy people are now providing the negative sound bites, as we can't possibly have media report something in a positive light when it comes to Railways!

Personally I think it's great now it has been opened and will be even better once it's been tidied up.

Plus unlike the other cheap bridge fitted before, there's little chance of this one being torn down in the future for whatever reason.

Sounds encouraging. I presume that one day in the not too distant future, all vehicular traffic will be sent around one of the bridge crossings despite the inevitable complaints from small High Street shopkeepers (probably mainly those on the southern side of the gates). If the city has any aspirations in becoming a popular place for visitors, the clearing High St. of queuing polluting traffic will become a priority and the street-level crossing will be removed like has happened in so many other places. The station acces and most of the visitor shopping seems to be north of the railway anyway and the locals will adjust their habits to new traffic flows.
 

lincolnshire

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Sounds encouraging. I presume that one day in the not too distant future, all vehicular traffic will be sent around one of the bridge crossings despite the inevitable complaints from small High Street shopkeepers (probably mainly those on the southern side of the gates). If the city has any aspirations in becoming a popular place for visitors, the clearing High St. of queuing polluting traffic will become a priority and the street-level crossing will be removed like has happened in so many other places. The station acces and most of the visitor shopping seems to be north of the railway anyway and the locals will adjust their habits to new traffic flows.

If they had not closed the avoiding line then the amount of freight going across High Street crossing would have been a lot less, the avoiding line was closed in 1985 I bet they wish it was still there. Considering that this is the route for freight to avoid the East Coast mainline and also the diversionary route for passenger trains when the main line is closed.

I think if you know Lincoln then you will find that the former St.Marks station site is a retail development with Debenhams, Boots etc all located on the former station site and even Lakeland in the former station buildings. Beyond that area is a large retail park and parking all on former railway land.
So the shopping area of Lincoln is both sides of the crossing on High Street so plenty of pedestrian movement between the two areas.

Not actually been across the bridge myself but the steps do look very step and of course its high too ready for the day if and when it ever happens that electrification ever gets this far over this way. So its a lot of steps to go up and down till the lifts are opened for use.
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Hilarious quote from that: "put a chip shop at the top, then people will use it."

Didn,t go over the bridge on Sunday as was not sure if chip shop was open or not as iota a long way up and down to find it closed.
 

66Yorks

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Surely people complaining about the bridge being too steep are just plain lazy. The steps will be DDA (Disability Discrimination Act) compliant so what's the fuss? Use those legs and get stepping!
 

lincolnshire

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Surely people complaining about the bridge being too steep are just plain lazy. The steps will be DDA (Disability Discrimination Act) compliant so what's the fuss? Use those legs and get stepping!

Look at Lincolnshire Echo newspaper ( This is Lincoln) site and its has pictures and a short video and see what you think.

I suppose the DDA will not be applicable for the steps as there are lifts provided when they get them into use to get you up to the cross over bridge and back down again on the other side. It is high as compared to the footbridges of old.
 
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AM9

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Look at Lincolnshire Echo newspaper ( This is Lincoln) site and its has pictures and a short video and see what you think.

I suppose the DDA will not be applicable for the steps as there are lifts provided when they get them into use to get you unto the cross over bridge and back down again on the other side. It is high as compared to the footbridges of old.

Of course the Lifts will be DDA compliant. The steps will be compliant with the current rules for normal public use. That should be fine for anybody with normal fitness. For those who have so far failed to attain a normal level of fitness, they provide an opportunity to do so now. Their alternative is to clog up the lifts, preventing those in real need from using them.
 

lincolnshire

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Did you look at the newspaper item and short video then? You can see the steps and height of bridge in it.
 

AM9

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I think if you know Lincoln then you will find that the former St.Marks station site is a retail development with Debenhams, Boots etc all located on the former station site and even Lakeland in the former station buildings. Beyond that area is a large retail park and parking all on former railway land.
So the shopping area of Lincoln is both sides of the crossing on High Street so plenty of pedestrian movement between the two areas.

Haven't been to Lincoln for about 15 years but I remember the lie of the land. The centre of gravity for opportunity shopping was clearly north of the railway plus the bulk of the city's tourist interest also lies there. If there really is a demand for large volume pedestrian crossing then there might be a case for escalators to provide assistance for able bodies pedestrians.
The vehicular crossing cannot contribute much to the city's road system, paticularly when Wigford Way and Mark St. get clogged with queueing traffic, so any significant increase in rail and/or road flows may trigger closure of the gates permanently as they will become unworkable. This would lead to existing alternative routes being used unless a new rail overbridge is created. It would be a shame if a commercial development on the quiet side of the tracks influenced a decision that impacted negatively on the success of City as a whole.
 

Darandio

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Did you look at the newspaper item and short video then? You can see the steps and height of bridge in it.

Yes, it has steps and goes up to a high enough height that allows trains to pass under safely, the steps then come down the other side, much like thousands of other bridges all over the world.

What is the problem?
 

Philip Phlopp

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Yes, it has steps and goes up to a high enough height that allows trains to pass under safely, the steps then come down the other side, much like thousands of other bridges all over the world.

What is the problem?

I'd say cholesterol, but it doesn't cause hysteria.
 

lincolnshire

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Yes, it has steps and goes up to a high enough height that allows trains to pass under safely, the steps then come down the other side, much like thousands of other bridges all over the world.

What is the problem?

I think you will find that the height of new bridges now is high enough for trains to pass under yes but there is also another large gap for where the overheads may be one day so bridges have to be higher than they used to be.

Look at Wakefield Westgate or the new platform 0 been built at Doncaster the both a lot higher than was needed before.
--- old post above --- --- new post below ---
--- old post above --- --- new post below ---
Haven't been to Lincoln for about 15 years but I remember the lie of the land. The centre of gravity for opportunity shopping was clearly north of the railway plus the bulk of the city's tourist interest also lies there. If there really is a demand for large volume pedestrian crossing then there might be a case for escalators to provide assistance for able bodies pedestrians.
The vehicular crossing cannot contribute much to the city's road system, paticularly when Wigford Way and Mark St. get clogged with queueing traffic, so any significant increase in rail and/or road flows may trigger closure of the gates permanently as they will become unworkable. This would lead to existing alternative routes being used unless a new rail overbridge is created. It would be a shame if a commercial development on the quiet side of the tracks influenced a decision that impacted negatively on the success of City as a whole.

Have a day out in Lincoln and you will see its changed since you was there 15 years ago, the place took off after the investment by the university. You will find people pass across the crossing to get to the shopping area at former St. Marks station and the existing shops in Hugh Street.
 
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AM9

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I think you will find that the height of new bridges now is high enough for trains to pass under yes but there is also another large gap for where the overheads may be one day so bridges have to be higher than they used to be.

Look at Wakefield Westgate or the new platform 0 been built at Doncaster the both a lot higher than was needed before.
--- old post above --- --- new post below ---
--- old post above --- --- new post below ---


Have a day out in Lincoln and you will see its changed since you was there 15 years ago, the place took off after the investment by the university. You will find people pass across the crossing to get to the shopping area at former St. Marks station and the existing shops in Hugh Street.

So like some other towns, they now have a safe permanently open footbridge and soon, lifts for the more feeble pedestrians. Even if the road crossing is closed sometime in the future, those routes will still be maintained for their use. If current and future development creates pedestrian traffic in excess of the current footbridge's capacity, some of the city's additional income can be used to increas that capacity further as appropriate. It just depends on how the city wishes to develop its retail and educational footfall, and whether it is prepared to use income to protect the activities that create that same income.
 

DarloRich

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Look at Lincolnshire Echo newspaper ( This is Lincoln) site and its has pictures and a short video and see what you think.

I suppose the DDA will not be applicable for the steps as there are lifts provided when they get them into use to get you up to the cross over bridge and back down again on the other side. It is high as compared to the footbridges of old.

The bridge will be DDA complaint and will comply with the public sector equality duty.

Newer bridges are often higher than older ones precisely to allow for the DDA requirements such as angle of approach ramps/steps AND future electrification.
 
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Failed Unit

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I am old enough to remember when the last footbridge existed (was it really nearly 25 years ago) Even then most people waited at the gates.

Interesting that people complain about the amount of time the crossing closes before the train arrives. They fail to understand that they are the reason for this. Considering how many people jump the lights here.
 

cuccir

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I struggle to see people's complaints about a bridge that offers the option to cross if you want, or to wait if you want. £12m sounds like a lot but in the context of public infrastructural spending, and a structure which will presumably have a lifespan of 50-100 years, it is really very little.
 
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