Manchester Piccadilly Trays

Discussion in 'Infrastructure & Stations' started by Legolash2o, 17 Oct 2019.

  1. Legolash2o

    Legolash2o Member

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    What are the trays at Manchester Piccadilly please? I have the feeling they are for waste.
     

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  3. Elecman

    Elecman Established Member

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    To try and keep the ballast clean from oil leaks and human excrement from those that can’t read on non retention tank toilet trains.
     
  4. Aictos

    Aictos Established Member

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    I’m sure they had them at London Paddington too?
     
  5. route101

    route101 Established Member

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    That track looks old , how old you reckon?
     
  6. CeeJ

    CeeJ Member

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    They do! (Or did, at least) - an episode of the television programme at Paddington spent quite a while explaining the gory details!
     
  7. Legolash2o

    Legolash2o Member

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    Are there still a lot of trains with non retention tanks?
     
  8. sprinterguy

    sprinterguy Established Member

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    At Manchester Piccadilly, up until recently it was quite a high proportion of the total as none of Northern classes 142, 150 or 156 that regularly use the station, nor classes 144 or 153 for completeness within the Northern fleet, were fitted with them. That number is decreasing as the Northern class 150s and 156s are being fitted with them as they go through their current refurbishment, and the 142s are expected to be withdrawn within a year.
    I could be wrong, but I thought everything was quite extensively renewed during the 2002 refurbishment, which was also when the trays were installed if I remember correctly.
     
  9. Ianno87

    Ianno87 Established Member

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    Yes, that's indeed when the trays were installed; I think in the early stages of the refurb around 1998/1999.
     
  10. fgwrich

    fgwrich Established Member

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    They did, but not anymore with the removal of the HSTs.
     
  11. DarloRich

    DarloRich Veteran Member

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    without wishing to be rude the picture clearly shows what the trays are for! There is a mixture of ordure, oil and rainwater in there and it is a HORRIBLE job to remove them
     
  12. johnnychips

    johnnychips Established Member

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    Shoot me down, but couldn’t you have something like a giant hoover to empty them, rather than removing them?
     
  13. DarloRich

    DarloRich Veteran Member

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    you do. But it is still a grotty job.
     
  14. route101

    route101 Established Member

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    That track or the joints and sleepers make them look a lot older than that .
     
  15. plugwash

    plugwash Member

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    Do northern's 319's have retention tanks?
     
  16. bionic

    bionic Member

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    They did on Thameslink.
     
  17. 185

    185 Established Member

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    The DSM was out a few months ago putting a fire out on one of them.... guessing a train had a fuel leak, plus a discarded cigarette.
     
  18. Llama

    Llama Established Member

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    Yes they do, they retain the ones they originally had. Their contents are heated too, yum.
     
  19. ess

    ess Member

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    How many diesel trains without retention tanks still visit Paddington each day?
     
  20. SquireBev

    SquireBev Member

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    The programme was made a couple of years ago, when HSTs were still the mainstay of long-range GWR services.
     
  21. Bigfoot

    Bigfoot Member

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    The one of the reasons why class 456 had their tanks removed was because they were not heated and froze in the winter. I'd suggest that most tanks are heated to keep the contents liquid, doesn't mean they are heated much above freezing. Certainly not going to be a boiling tank of daily ablutions.
     
  22. tomwills98

    tomwills98 Member

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    They freeze and expand in the winter which may crack the tank, then when it thaws it leaks out. I'm surprised it doesn't drain the battery overnight. Not warm enough to put a teabag in there that's for sure.
     
  23. plugwash

    plugwash Member

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    The HSTs have all been replaced by intercity express bi-modes over the last few years and as far as I can tell all the local services are run with fairly modern EMUs. so presumablly those also have tanks.

    That leaves the night rivera, which is locomotive hauled MK3s, wikipedia claims the sleeping cars are fitted with controlled emmision toilets but it's not to so clear about the non-sleeping cars (though it does talk about recent new toilet fitment, which would presumablly come with retention tanks).
     
  24. vlad

    vlad Member

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    I haven't travelled on the Night Riviera since they refurbished it.

    However, a few years ago there were stickers in the toilet in the lounge car saying not to flush when the train was in a station.

    Given that pretty much the first thing the stewardess said to me when I checked in was that I could use the toilet in the sleeping car at any time I'd hope they have retention tanks!
     
  25. Peter Mugridge

    Peter Mugridge Established Member

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    There are still a few 165 / 166 units turning up at Paddington daily.
     
  26. Merle Haggard

    Merle Haggard Member

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    In the late '60s - early ' 70s Euston and Paddington stations had troughs fitted on the lines of some platforms, for the use of sleeping car trains, to my certain knowledge; other stations where sleeper services started or terminated may well have been so fitted.
    Bear in mind that, when sleeper services provided a wide choice of routes, passengers could board sleeper services from around 2030-2100 and remain aboard, on arrival, to around 0800 - 08.30 but the trains, particularly on the shorter routes, might not depart until nearer midnight and arrive around 05.00-06.00. The cabins in ex LMS, GW and BR Mk1 vehicles had an interesting arrangement when the call of nature had to be met before departure time, and the equipment was NOT marked 'Do not use in stations' (though it WAS marked 'not for solid matter'...) and, when used, simply discharged onto the track - hence the troughs. Arriving into Euston about 08.00 on my daily commute, a man in waterproof clothing was often to be seen working along the troughs, as the empty stock left, with a powerful hosepipe.
    There was an overnight Manchester Picc - Euston train which conveyed sleeping cars. It left Manchester around midnight and arrived at Euston about 05.00 and, just possibly, this train may have been the original reason for a trough there.
    Sleeper services often detached cars en route (Exeter, for instance) and the passengers in these would not be asked to vacate until about 08.00, which could be several hours after they were placed in the platform, so these locations would very likely also have troughs.
    I'm fairly sure that, at least in the period mentioned, troughs were NOT provided with the purpose of collecting leaking oil or the effects of passengers ignoring the 'Do not use in stations' instructions.
     

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