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Marylebone rail workers 'held lockdown baby shower' at closed station patisserie

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setdown

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Not a great look I fear! A bit of a kick in the teeth to staff and passengers trying to be careful.


A rail company has begun an internal investigation after staff allegedly held a surprise baby shower in a closed Patisserie Valerie bakery at London's Marylebone station during lockdown.
Chiltern Railways workers told BBC News up to 20 colleagues, including some who were on shift, attended the gathering.
They claim some party-goers then had positive Covid tests, forcing most of the team to self-isolate.
Chiltern said "appropriate action" would be taken after its investigation.
 
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ChrisC

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Wow. That sets a new level of stupid.
It’s inconsiderate people doing stupid things like this that has really annoyed me throughout this last year.
I have tried to be sensible right through since last March and have generally followed the rules even when I haven’t agreed with them. What we desperately need now is to get through these next few weeks and have an end to this lockdown. Many aspects of this lockdown have been completely over the top and has wrecked lives and the economy, but doing things like this will not help things to get back to normal any sooner.
 

peters

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Wow. That sets a new level of stupid.

Beyond stupid. Illegally entering a premises, breaking the law on group gatherings during a global pandemic and in some cases committing those offences while they were on shift and should have been working. On first reading I thought some of them are going to be subject to disciplinary procedures and there's going to be some fines handed out by the police but on re-reading and realising how they got in to the premises I wouldn't be surprised if there's some suspended prison sentences handed out.
 

pdeaves

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The trouble is this sort of disregard for the rules tends to lead to stricter rules... which then penalise the law-abiding when the non-law-abiding will keep breaking them. That's not very succinctly put but you and I end up paying for others' misdemeanours.
 

bramling

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It’s inconsiderate people doing stupid things like this that has really annoyed me throughout this last year.
I have tried to be sensible right through since last March and have generally followed the rules even when I haven’t agreed with them. What we desperately need now is to get through these next few weeks and have an end to this lockdown. Many aspects of this lockdown have been completely over the top and has wrecked lives and the economy, but doing things like this will not help things to get back to normal any sooner.

Whilst this example is a little extreme, I wouldn’t say this sort of thing is that unusual.

It’s a reality that there’s mixing going on in workplaces, and a lot of people who have been at work right through this will take the view that if they’re essentially expected to mix at work with few mitigations extant in practice, then why shouldn’t they have the odd crumb of enjoyment for their troubles? I can certainly think of some leaving “events” which have happened in my neck of the woods - there’s certainly been been more than the fair share of retirements over the last year.

Given how many examples there’s been at my place of people passing away not massively long after retirement, quite honestly people aren’t going to be prevented from giving respected colleagues a decent last day. Another example of where the neurotic brigade need to rejoin the real world, instead of allowing life to be halted by the likes of Ferguson.

Having said all that, the Marylebone example does seem a little OTT.

The trouble is this sort of disregard for the rules tends to lead to stricter rules... which then penalise the law-abiding when the non-law-abiding will keep breaking them. That's not very succinctly put but you and I end up paying for others' misdemeanours.

As a matter of interest, it’s funny how the term “the rules” has slipped into common use. There’s no such thing as “the rules”. What we have are laws and guidance, the former mandatory the latter advisory. Indeed given the way the usual parliamentary scrutiny has tended to be subverted, any respect one might normally have for laws I find is somewhat degraded in practice. Another worry for the future, just like the way certain police forces are trashing respect they previously enjoyed.

“The rules” makes me think either of something like school rules, which is no way to garner support from a population (even if harking back to Eton is the best Boris can come up with), or perhaps a Maoist concept one might expect to find in a state like China.
 
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VauxhallandI

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Whilst this example is a little extreme, I wouldn’t say this sort of thing is that unusual.

It’s a reality that there’s mixing going on in workplaces, and a lot of people who have been at work right through this will take the view that if they’re essentially expected to mix at work with few mitigations extant in practice, then why shouldn’t they have the odd crumb of enjoyment for their troubles? I can certainly think of some leaving “events” which have happened in my neck of the woods - there’s certainly been been more than the fair share of retirements over the last year.

Given how many examples there’s been at my place of people passing away not massively long after retirement, quite honestly people aren’t going to be prevented from giving respected colleagues a decent last day. Another example of where the neurotic brigade need to rejoin the real world, instead of allowing life to be halted by the likes of Ferguson.

Having said all that, the Marylebone example does seem a little OTT.



As a matter of interest, it’s funny how the term “the rules” has slipped into common use. There’s no such thing as “the rules”. What we have are laws and guidance, the former mandatory the latter advisory. Indeed given the way the usual parliamentary scrutiny has tended to be subverted, any respect one might normally have for laws I find is somewhat degraded.

“The rules” makes me think either of something like school rules, which is no way to garner support from a population (even if harking back to Eton is the best Boris can come up with), or perhaps a Maoist concept one might expect to find in a state like China.
I tend to agree that this another example (outside of breaking and entering) where these people have been together for months so it has the potential of being a non story in the calculation of extra risk.

That won’t stop people trumpeting it and other people being upset I spent 12 minutes in Tesco without a mask yet not being anywhere near anyone. Ho hum my time will come
 

43096

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Beyond stupid. Illegally entering a premises, breaking the law on group gatherings during a global pandemic and in some cases committing those offences while they were on shift and should have been working. On first reading I thought some of them are going to be subject to disciplinary procedures and there's going to be some fines handed out by the police but on re-reading and realising how they got in to the premises I wouldn't be surprised if there's some suspended prison sentences handed out.
Not only that, they were then stupid enough to post it on social media. They deserve whatever disciplinary and police action follows just for being that brain dead.
 

bramling

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I tend to agree that this another example (outside of breaking and entering) where these people have been together for months so it has the potential of being a non story in the calculation of extra risk.

That won’t stop people trumpeting it and other people being upset I spent 12 minutes in Tesco without a mask yet not being anywhere near anyone. Ho hum my time will come

This is the thing. Some of the neurotic brigade who get incensed at seeing someone in a supermarket without a mask might well be surprised at how little distancing happens, or is indeed practicable, in many workplaces - especially where people have worked together as a team or in a roster for the last year.

Like my place, where I have had a trainee on and off since Christmas. He seems to have been farmed round a variety of different people, which didn’t really need to happen, but that’s the nature of shift-based work - it simply isn’t possible to keep people together. I could have refused to accommodate the person citing Covid, but I didn’t think it was fair to hold up his progress. And, to be honest, I’ve been glad of a bit of company / normality. The Covid stasi would no doubt be up in arms.
 

Ianno87

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I hypothesised about this scenario the other day, if a bunch of people who worked together just decided, whilst still on the premises, to sit together and enjoy a drink after work (or something).

Probably against "the rules", but not adding much real risk, besides mixing for longer than is strictly necessary (so in theory a slightly higher risk of transmission).

Although in this case, not a terribly good look for "key workers", in an industry that the media never hesitates to criticise.
 

the sniper

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No excuse, but probably not much worse than most messrooms or train crew management offices... Social media strikes again.
 

bramling

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I hypothesised about this scenario the other day, if a bunch of people who worked together just decided, whilst still on the premises, to sit together and enjoy a drink after work (or something).

Probably against "the rules", but not adding much real risk, besides mixing for longer than is strictly necessary (so in theory a slightly higher risk of transmission).

Although in this case, not a terribly good look for "key workers", in an industry that the media never hesitates to criticise.

Whether it’s a good look or not shouldn’t really count for much. It’s no more of a bad look than the banter I see between Tesco’s staff every time I do my shopping, or between emergency services staff when they turn up for something at work. This is why I suggest some of the “terrified to go out” brigade might have their eyes ripe to be opened a little.

I for one am glad these key workers are prepared to just get on with things, as if not life would have quite literally ground to a halt over the last year, and we really would have no food on our tables, no power, no health service, etc etc etc.

If workplaces were serious about reducing opportunities for Covid transmission then we wouldn’t still have rosters, as this is a sure-fire way of mixing different people together on a fairly random basis.
 

greyman42

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Not only that, they were then stupid enough to post it on social media. They deserve whatever disciplinary and police action follows just for being that brain dead.
I don't think they deserve to loose their jobs. No one will benefit from that.
 

Darandio

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Whether it’s a good look or not shouldn’t really count for much. It’s no more of a bad look than the banter I see between Tesco’s staff every time I do my shopping, or between emergency services staff when they turn up for something at work.

I'm not sure there is any comparison at all there really. If it was in their own messroom then possibly it's similar, piling into a closed outlet isn't.

That wasn't the stupidity here though, advertising it on social media was.
 

Kite159

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Not only that, they were then stupid enough to post it on social media. They deserve whatever disciplinary and police action follows just for being that brain dead.

Which is probably the downfall. At least do a party to celebrate the baby (or retirement/someone leaving/major birthday etc) but tell those attending not to post anything about it on public visible Social Media.

Or control what photos are posted so anything posted isn't breaking any guidance (i.e. 2 metres apart)
 

bramling

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Which is probably the downfall. At least do a party to celebrate the baby (or retirement/someone leaving/major birthday etc) but tell those attending not to post anything about it on public visible Social Media.

Or control what photos are posted so anything posted isn't breaking any guidance (i.e. 2 metres apart)

The problem seems to have been more that one or more other people kicked off about it, perhaps because they ended up picking up workload as a result of others isolating.

Curious that this has taken well over a month to hit the news.

What they did was a little daft, especially gaining access to the PV outlet (though they didn’t “break in” - someone would have been able to source a key), but it really isn’t the end of the world. I bet there’s been plenty of similar all over those industries which have remained open, just without the Patisserie bit. Reality is there’s only so much people will take of turning up for work day after day and essentially being expected to expose themselves to Covid risk, but meanwhile can’t expose themselves to a similar level of risk (mixing with the self-same people) for anything nice.
 
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SteveM70

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It’s inconsiderate people doing stupid things like this that has really annoyed me throughout this last year.
I have tried to be sensible right through since last March and have generally followed the rules even when I haven’t agreed with them.

They might argue the same. Either you follow the rules and can take the moral high ground, or you don’t and you can’t. Sorry if that sounds harsh but there’s a whiff of double standards, unless it’s lazy phrasing and you really have followed the rules


Not only that, they were then stupid enough to post it on social media. They deserve whatever disciplinary and police action follows just for being that brain dead.

My former next door neighbour was a policeman and he always said a lot of criminals get caught because they can’t resist showing off about what they’ve done. In the old days it was to a mate in a pub who turned out to be a grass, nowadays it’s Twitter and Facebook
 

Yew

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The trouble is this sort of disregard for the rules tends to lead to stricter rules... which then penalise the law-abiding when the non-law-abiding will keep breaking them. That's not very succinctly put but you and I end up paying for others' misdemeanours.
We will all pay because our Tyrant demands it, we must protect his insane desire to 'beat' the virus no matter what the cost to us is.
 

bramling

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We will all pay because our Tyrant demands it, we must protect his insane desire to 'beat' the virus no matter what the cost to us is.

Penalising everyone because of the actions of some is generally an example of weak, poor and ineffective management. Setting people against each other is also a good way of deflecting from failures.

The abusive relationship comparison made by some is quite valid, IMO. I’m not sure this is necessarily deliberate, more another example of this government’s poor people skills, no doubt the result of their collective lack of real-world life experience and achievement. Boris, for example, has built his career on ... oh yes, making people laugh.
 

43096

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Reality is there’s only so much people will take of turning up for work day after day and essentially being expected to expose themselves to Covid risk, but meanwhile can’t expose themselves to a similar level of risk (mixing with the self-same people) for anything nice.
Ah, the smug superiority of the railway. This whole "key worker" thing is being mis-used now. Never mind all those people who don't have jobs any more, or those working from home who haven't seen their colleagues in months, or are struggling mentally with the whole situation. Everyone is affected by this. Excuse me if the heart doesn't bleed for a few "key workers" who take the proverbial.
 

bramling

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Ah, the smug superiority of the railway. This whole "key worker" thing is being mis-used now. Never mind all those people who don't have jobs any more, or those working from home who haven't seen their colleagues in months, or are struggling mentally with the whole situation. Everyone is affected by this. Excuse me if the heart doesn't bleed for a few "key workers" who take the proverbial.

It’s no different to all those cars one sees out and about in the mid and late evening. Fact is many people have been meeting up with others right through this, it should come as no surprise that this has been happening occasionally in workplace settings too.
 

Wychwood93

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Is there anybody on here who has not drifted slightly 'off-piste' over the last ten months (and counting) of misery? Just not quite been on-board with regard to the rules, laws, guidance, tiers, suggestions that have not always been wholly clear? I have not, and I daresay that is true for many on here.
 

nedchester

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I don't think they deserve to loose their jobs. No one will benefit from that.
I can see a few P45s being sent out over this. Deservedly so as well especially as the event was held during the November lockdown.

It’s no different to all those cars one sees out and about in the mid and late evening. Fact is many people have been meeting up with others right through this, it should come as no surprise that this has been happening occasionally in workplace settings too.
I am sure they have but doing it on work premises is out of order in the extreme especially during lockdown and advertising it on social media.
 

Gloster

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Somewhere or other it said that they had gained access to the patisserie by using the key retained for emergency, out-of-hours access. In my eyes that is the most serious offence and it would probably have been seen so in my time on the railway. Such keys should be kept in their allocated place unless needed for their intended purpose. I know that sounds pretentious, but you should never be casual with emergency equipment, even something as innocuous as a key.
 

Bertie the bus

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What they did was a little daft, especially gaining access to the PV outlet (though they didn’t “break in” - someone would have been able to source a key), but it really isn’t the end of the world.
That is a ridiculous statement. Having a key for access in the event of an emergency - fire alarm going off, etc - doesn't mean you have the authority to use the property for a party without the occupier's consent.
They might argue the same. Either you follow the rules and can take the moral high ground, or you don’t and you can’t. Sorry if that sounds harsh but there’s a whiff of double standards, unless it’s lazy phrasing and you really have followed the rules
There are degrees. There is a difference between doing something that might not be 100% within the spirit of the guidelines, e.g. taking a 10 minute walk and sitting on a bench for 20 minutes, and taking the piss. It’s obvious their behavior upset some of their colleagues, with so many isolating at the same time possibly inconvenienced the key worker passengers many in the rail industry boast about being essential to, and it has embarrassed their employer.
 

Ben Bow

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Jeez, reading through the comments here, there really are some serious cases of cabin fever going on.... I assume those calling for the death penalty are absolutely rigorous in their own adherence to coronavirus restrictions...
 

farleigh

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Jeez, reading through the comments here, there really are some serious cases of cabin fever going on.... I assume those calling for the death penalty are absolutely rigorous in their own adherence to coronavirus restrictions...
Trial by ordeal is too good for them
 

peters

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Is there anybody on here who has not drifted slightly 'off-piste' over the last ten months (and counting) of misery? Just not quite been on-board with regard to the rules, laws, guidance, tiers, suggestions that have not always been wholly clear? I have not, and I daresay that is true for many on here.

The date of the incident was during the second national lockdown, not on a date when we had regional tiers which kept changing.
 

peters

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That is a ridiculous statement. Having a key for access in the event of an emergency - fire alarm going off, etc - doesn't mean you have the authority to use the property for a party without the occupier's consent.
Indeed. Imagine if a local police station were left the keys to a closed premises incase of emergency and their staff entered it solely for the purpose of having a party. In those circumstances it would be likely the Home secretary would have to give a statement on the matter.

The problem seems to have been more that one or more other people kicked off about it, perhaps because they ended up picking up workload as a result of others isolating.

Curious that this has taken well over a month to hit the news.

What they did was a little daft, especially gaining access to the PV outlet (though they didn’t “break in” - someone would have been able to source a key), but it really isn’t the end of the world. I bet there’s been plenty of similar all over those industries which have remained open, just without the Patisserie bit. Reality is there’s only so much people will take of turning up for work day after day and essentially being expected to expose themselves to Covid risk, but meanwhile can’t expose themselves to a similar level of risk (mixing with the self-same people) for anything nice.

Well it seems the incident originally went unnoticed until someone noticed a post on a social media feed.

Using your reasoning if a member of rail staff has a key allowing them access to cabs on trains then they are allowed to enter a cab whenever they want for whatever reason. I don't know what agreements are in place between rail staff and train companies but I would hope that isn't the case.

If I was leasing the retail premises in question and I hadn't had my rent and utility bills waived in full for the period the unit couldn't be opened then it wouldn't be a question of whether I would take action, it would be a question of whether the compensation from the rail workers in question is settled out-of-court or in court. Do you remember the news story from the below link? If a man can be arrested for theft of electricity by using a plug socket without authorisation, then the rail workers in question turning on lights or a tap for the purpose of their party might also be classed as theft of a utility.

 
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VauxhallandI

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Maybe then they should be charged soul on the use of a third parties premises without permission.

All this "optics" stuff is winding me up, if it is within the "Corona Laws" then thats the end of that angle on the matter. I read an article on Welsh politicians having a drink whilst working late; the didn't buy it from the catering company and they weren't served it by them. So if its not against the law move on.

Here it is:

Questions should be raised over whether Senedd members who drank alcohol on Welsh Parliament premises during a pub alcohol ban can stand for re-election, an ex-standards official said.




Lets concentrate on the real law breaking issues such as:

Nine Met Police officers have been fined for breaching lockdown rules to meet at a cafe while on duty.
Pictures emerged online showing the officers, from the South East Basic Command Unit, eating at The Chef House Kitchen Cafe, Greenwich, on 9 January.


 
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