Mistaken for Staff?

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Trog

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I've been mistaken for a member if staff working for Sainbury's after popping in for a shop straight after work. :lol:


Try working for the P-Way wear a black shirt and trousers. Then go into B&Q during your dinner break.
 
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Flamingo

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I have to say, I'm often confused with somebody who cares :D
 

Muzer

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I've had plenty of people asking me "is this the London train?" at Salisbury when I was in school uniform, but I doubt it's because I looked like staff - just because I often happened to be near the underpass exit ;) (when the train starts there, the information screens say it will not call at the station for quite some time).
 

aformeruser

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While wearing a particular pair of blue trousers and a purple shirt I have been mistaken for a Northern employee! It happened twice in one day, and another time by an actual member of staff. and I think a couple have 'done a double take' as it were. I was wearing my own coat, which was black. It's not like I had any branding or anything and these were clearly respectable members of the public, at a few different locations, not just P13.

I had a blue coat before the Northern franchise started and when it started some Northern staff started wearing Northern Rail branded coats almost identical to mine. It was actually the staff that got confused, some of guards and RPIs didn't seem to care about checking my ticket when I was wearing it.

One day when I was waiting for someone alighting a train at Deansgate wearing dark blue jeans and a black jacket one person asked me if I could arrange wheelchair assistance and a few others presented their tickets for inspection when walking past me. (I was waiting in the same area that G4S would have been if they had been there on that day.)

Although, sometimes I think it can be a case of if you look well organised then people are more likely to ask you for help then a disorganised person whether they think you're staff or not.
--- old post above --- --- new post below ---
Someone asked me where the frozen chicken was in ASDA once because I had the audacity to go there while still in my railway uniform.

I hope you responded by saying something like "Have you tried the freezer?"
 

Cherry_Picker

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I hope you responded by saying something like "Have you tried the freezer?"

I try to subscribe to Wheaton's Law (google it) wherever possible in my day to day life, so I just told them I didn't know.

If I take the train to work I will often get asked questions by people at New Street and even though I don't work there I will try to answer as best as I can.
The way I see it is that we are all one railway and if I can make a passenger's experience better then I will.
 

Daniel

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The way I see it is that we are all one railway and if I can make a passenger's experience better then I will.


Same here. I wear uniform to/from work as I don't mind being asked questions - (plus I can't be bothered to carry a spare set of clothes all day...)
When walking to/from platforms to/from work I'll stop and ask people if they need help if they're standing by maps looking confused etc... at King's Cross whilst waiting for my train to work, I'll stand by the route map in case anyone want's to ask for help. It's a visible presence for passengers and if I'm standing on the platform waiting for a train anyway I might as well help someone if I can. I may be a signaller but I still have route knowledge!
 

Starmill

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I must now have an 'I know what I'm doing' look as it seems to happen more often now. I think at the station I work at, people recognise me so ask anyway, but how it happens elsewhere I don't know. Was in SWT land yesterday wearing a blue t-shirt that vaguely resembles SWT/EMT colours (but is a bit brighter) I got asked questions a couple of times. One guy actually apologised saying "I know you're off duty but..." - as it was a Clapham Junction I had to refer him to station staff, that place confuses me too much to give him an accurate answer.

Ditto for CLJ :D

Though I think I know what you mean about the "'I know what I'm doing' look" - if you work on the railway but are riding around for leisure would you... carry yourself differently to how you used to? I would have guessed so. Unless you try to hide it!

I kind of like platform 13 because the throughput of trains is such that nobody ever notices how long you've been stood there but it affords a great view of proceedings - perhaps I do look like I'm 'working' because I'm checking the train and the signal and usually standing next to the guard. In fact, last week when the R indicator was broken, I had to resist the temptation to shout to some of the guards (generally the non-local ones) who didn't know to use the buzzer!


It's never happened to me. Perhaps because I don't dress smartly.

In fact a lot of the times when I've tried to help someone who looks a bit lost or confused, they seem to take offense that a member of the public thinks they need help.

:D Don't worry I don't dress up to go bashing. Though now you've given me the idea...

I often see people, frequently foreign tourists, whom I know I could help... but don't. For one I might not know the answer (that'd be awkward!) or I might not be able to understand them... but mainly you can never predict how anyone might react!

I've had more than one passenger wanting to be mistaken for staff, wearing quasi-uniform, high-vis, "look like a freight driver at first glance" type clothes, invariably they didn't have a ticket.

I once took a FGW lanyard off a chap who when asked for his ticket pointed at his lanyard - him and his mate (both teens) had drivers bags as well, it was the shorts and flip-flops that made me suspicious!

Innovative faredodging technique? Flamingo's busted it! All we need now is for 455Driver to turn up and accuse me of impersonating staff!;) Though to the guy who needs a more expensive suit... LOL, though I think the FGW uniform is one of the smartest. Not because it looks inherently better, but because you might actually wear those colours. How many people really wear purple shirts or maroon jackets?

Methinks ATW have a fairly greenish uniform? But do they still have grey trousers/waistcoat? And LM's shirts are a very odd colour!
 
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RichmondCommu

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I know the bank I used to work for recommended that uniformed staff commute out of uniform, and that people with ID badges refrain from displaying or wearing them outside the office.

My wife is a police officer in the 'Met. Suffice to say she always gets changed before taking the train home!
 

quarella

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I must have a certain look because from my teenage years I have been asked where things were in shops wearing anything from school uniform when I was of an age to wear it to t-shirt shorts and flip flops. When I started my railway career I would usually cover my uniform but it didn't seem to help. Still asked when on a platform. My job no longer involves wearing a uniform and is off station but a few months ago on a work day. Extremely tired after a shocking early turn someone had walked around the platform staff and asked me a question. I did not know the answer and said to them, a bit sharper than intended "why don't you ask someone who works here, like those people over there." As they walked away I realised on that day I had put the company tie on and for once not taken it off when my shift ended. My coat was done up so I hope it was barely visible.
 

causton

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How many people really wear purple shirts or maroon jackets?

Methinks ATW have a fairly greenish uniform? But do they still have grey trousers/waistcoat? And LM's shirts are a very odd colour!

Anything in Greater Anglia colours is pretty awful - those jackets almost make me throw up!

Meanwhile - I work in retail, in tracksuit bottoms and a polo shirt, and despite a massive logo on the back and front of the shirt (and down the side of the trousers) people still ask me if I work here. I have a feeling it's more their fault than mine ;)
 

MattRobinson

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I was volunteering at rail fest on a stall and we were told to have our lanyards visible at all times while within the show. During my break, I went to look in the cabs of various locomotives and, even when stood quietly at the back of the group, I kept getting asked questions on the locos.

When going out on engines at the preserved railway where I volunteer, I often carry an ex-BR drivers bag; including on trains. Although I've had a few funny looks from railway staff, nobody has said anything yet - I am expecting someone to question it eventually though...

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk 2
 

Antman

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I was waiting for my daughter at Chatham standing by the open ticket gates when a lady tried to give me her ticket, must have been the black coat I was wearing?
 

M60lad

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Out of interest has anybody been confused as staff while traveling on a train and ended up getting a free ride
 

TheVicLine

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I get it all the time if i'm in supermarkets in my drivers uniform.

It's a definate that I will be asked where the cauliflower or cat food is if I have my name badge on as well. Had someone get quite annoyed recently cos I couldn't help her in Tesco, she said 'well why don't you know you work here'.
 

GodAtum

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is there a rule against cyclists wearing hi-vis on platforms in case it confuses people or drivers?
 

quarella

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On the flip side, have any on-duty staff been mistaken for passengers?

Yes. Colleagues and myself all have tales of our passes being requested at every station, even wearing the company tie.
--- old post above --- --- new post below ---
is there a rule against cyclists wearing hi-vis on platforms in case it confuses people or drivers?

There doesn't appear to be a rule about station staff wearing them. I understand for train crew it is only required when on or near the line.
If it is going to confuse drivers then you would have to ban anyone wearing red/amber/green as well though they do seem to cope with Virgin staff on platforms.
 

Flamingo

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Flamingo, I am shocked! <D That is no way to treat our French colleagues! :p:p

I did tell a french chap yesterday that he needed to catch the Waterloo train at Reading. The look he gave me suggested he thought I was taking the proverbial :lol:
 

hairyhandedfool

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I think G4S RPIs have asked rail staff for their tickets before. :roll:

Some Northern staff (with ID) have been refused access to a platform, due to not having a ticket, by G4S staff. The Northern staff in question were on duty and due to work a train.
 

aformeruser

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Some Northern staff (with ID) have been refused access to a platform, due to not having a ticket, by G4S staff. The Northern staff in question were on duty and due to work a train.

I heard the same thing happened to XC staff until the driver apparently said something along the lines of "If you don't allow us access that train will go no-where and you'll be asked to explain why you directly caused a train to be cancelled."

With G4S they seem to say 'Thank You' to passengers who show an orange ticket that they are happy with but show them anything else and they get suspicious.
 

leytongabriel

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try wearing a hi viz vest and see what happens, even if you are near your cycle!
but i did manage to get a couple of very old ladies somewhere to sit down at a packed free open air event recently as people thought i was security ;)
--- old post above --- --- new post below ---
is there a rule against cyclists wearing hi-vis on platforms in case it confuses people or drivers?

i think there might be one for not having bike lights on, as i was sharply told off for that on the overground once
 

Skoodle

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I think there might be one for not having bike lights on, as i was sharply told off for that on the overground once

It's not an official rule, but I do ask cyclists to turn their red lights off when on the platform. On the East London Line approaching some stations through the tunnel, flashing red lights reflect off the walls and all we see is a flashing red light on approach, which to us is a hand danger signal. A few times I've had to slow right down to a crawl and approach the station at walking pace until I can see what the problem is only to find it's a cyclist. As we can't see the full platform most of the time until the cab is at the beginning of the ramp we have to treat it each time as if someone is displaying a danger signal. We just can't take the risk.
 

stut

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I've never been confused for railway staff. I do seem to be regularly confused for a walking map - in the most unlikely locations (stations included, and not just in this country).

The oddest, though, is being mistaken for medical staff in a hospital. That has happened to me on more than one occasions.
 

broadgage

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Out of interest has anybody been confused as staff while traveling on a train and ended up getting a free ride

I have been regulary confused with staff and could well have got a free ride, but did not because firstly it is not honest, and secondly I had already purchased my ticket.
Sitting with two railway employess whom I know, I was not asked for tickets (and neither were the staff asked for any proof)

I once boarded a train at Paddington wearing clean overalls and carrying a tool box and roll of cable, no one asked for a ticket, though I did have a first class one.
I did however hear a few muterings from other passengers that "staff should not use first class" I was rather hoping for an RPI but like policemen there are never any around when you want them.
 

ChiefPlanner

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It's not an official rule, but I do ask cyclists to turn their red lights off when on the platform. On the East London Line approaching some stations through the tunnel, flashing red lights reflect off the walls and all we see is a flashing red light on approach, which to us is a hand danger signal. A few times I've had to slow right down to a crawl and approach the station at walking pace until I can see what the problem is only to find it's a cyclist. As we can't see the full platform most of the time until the cab is at the beginning of the ramp we have to treat it each time as if someone is displaying a danger signal. We just can't take the risk.

And have pointed out to a cyclist wheeling his bike along the down fast at St Albans with a red light on the back facing oncoming trains - fair play - he understood the issues (and probably saved a heart stopping moment for a down EMT which went through a few moments later on this winters evening)
 

stuartmoss

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When my Dad worked for MFI in the 90s, he used to get the train home from Barnsley to Silkstone Common, and was constantly being approached on Barnsley station as though he was a member of staff because of the uniform. He found it amusing.
 

Antman

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Some Northern staff (with ID) have been refused access to a platform, due to not having a ticket, by G4S staff. The Northern staff in question were on duty and due to work a train.


Why does that not suprise me?

G4S................dear oh dear:cry:
 
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