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Moving to London: Help me use the tube

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Denzo

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So I just scored a grad job down in London starting later in the year that will see me work in the city of London itself

Ideally looking to find somewhere that has a direct tube connection to Bank or Liverpool Street. I don't mind a slightly longer commute, but ideally, I want to avoid connections for simplicity. So really looking for anywhere on the Central, Northern, Circle, H&C or Metropolitan line (although I've heard there's often issues with the Northern line, is this true?)

Asides from suggestions of suitable areas for young guys in their early 20s to live, which would be appreciated, I'm just wondering about the logistics of actually using the tube

http://content.tfl.gov.uk/2016-adult-fares.pdf

I have a contactless bank card, does this make any kind of season ticket redundant? Also, do I need any form of ticket other than the card itself or do I just present it at the ticket barrier?

I'd imagine I'll be living in zone 2 or zone 3 and then commuting into the city centre 4 days a week. Now suppose I want to venture a bit further out for whatever reason, to visit a friend or whatever, that would involve going into the 4th or 5th zone, can I still use the contactless card and just pay a single fare?

Help would be appreciated, I don't know how to London
 
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AM9

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So I just scored a grad job down in London starting later in the year that will see me work in the city of London itself

Ideally looking to find somewhere that has a direct tube connection to Bank or Liverpool Street. I don't mind a slightly longer commute, but ideally, I want to avoid connections for simplicity. So really looking for anywhere on the Central, Northern, Circle, H&C or Metropolitan line (although I've heard there's often issues with the Northern line, is this true?)

Asides from suggestions of suitable areas for young guys in their early 20s to live, which would be appreciated, I'm just wondering about the logistics of actually using the tube

http://content.tfl.gov.uk/2016-adult-fares.pdf

I have a contactless bank card, does this make any kind of season ticket redundant? Also, do I need any form of ticket other than the card itself or do I just present it at the ticket barrier?

I'd imagine I'll be living in zone 2 or zone 3 and then commuting into the city centre 4 days a week. Now suppose I want to venture a bit further out for whatever reason, to visit a friend or whatever, that would involve going into the 4th or 5th zone, can I still use the contactless card and just pay a single fare?

Help would be appreciated, I don't know how to London

The stations along the metro part of the GE Mainline (now TFL Rail, - to be Crossrail in about 3 years) might give you better access to Liverpool St and in more comfort.
 

Denzo

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The stations along the metro part of the GE Mainline (now TFL Rail, - to be Crossrail in about 3 years) might give you better access to Liverpool St and in more comfort.

You sure? Remember I want to live in London itself, not the commuter belt
 

telstarbox

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You could also look at anywhere in SE London (which tends to be cheaper for housing) with trains into Cannon Street - from there you can walk to work. The stations are still part of the TfL / Oyster system.

http://www.southeasternrailway.co.uk/your-journey/network-map/

Clapham (on the Northern Line) is absolutely stuffed with graduate scheme people :)
New Cross and Peckham have lots to do (bars, cinema, parks) and a more arty crowd due to Goldsmiths/Camberwell College.
Greenwich is nice if you can afford it.
Lewisham and Catford not quite as nice but 'up and coming'.

If you're looking to move into an existing houseshare then www.spareroom.co.uk is a good place to start.
--- old post above --- --- new post below ---
I have a contactless bank card, does this make any kind of season ticket redundant? Also, do I need any form of ticket other than the card itself or do I just present it at the ticket barrier?

I'd imagine I'll be living in zone 2 or zone 3 and then commuting into the city centre 4 days a week. Now suppose I want to venture a bit further out for whatever reason, to visit a friend or whatever, that would involve going into the 4th or 5th zone, can I still use the contactless card and just pay a single fare?

You'll probably want a monthly or annual ticket which has to go on an Oyster card rather than contactless. If you use it outside your season zones you are only charged the additional fare from the pay as you go balance.
--- old post above --- --- new post below ---
You sure? Remember I want to live in London itself, not the commuter belt

These stations are in London. It's a big place!
 
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Harpers Tate

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...or North London into Moorgate - easily walkable to Bank. Or Docklands (DLR into Bank). Or District Line to Monument (= Bank). etc.
 

Mojo

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If anything the Northern line is probably one of the most reliable lines, it's very rare that you have problems. Though if commuting you'd probably want to be living on the right side of the river as it can get very busy south of Bank!

Not sure what the map posted above is of, I'd be surprised to see rents that cheap in the Ruislip and Sudbury areas, similarly I've just rented out a spare room for £450 less than the amount on that map yet struggled to find interest due to the price.

As others have said, if you are to be a daily commuter, then an Annual Travelcard on Oyster will be the cheapest. You can top up with Pay As You Go credit and you'll get charged the fare when you go outside your zones. Just be sure to touch in and out.
 

plcd1

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I would suggest you need to get your housing costs sorted out first. That will determine where you can afford to live. The transport will follow on from that. While I can understand why you might prefer a direct journey you will have to simply accept that using public transport means you MUST change change lines or between the tube and DLR or Tube and main line rail services. You will also end up using the buses too - especially if you're out late in town and need a Night Bus home.

To be honest the only way you will piece London together is to walk and / or use the buses to help you get a visual mental picture of what London looks like at street level. Just forever stepping in and out of tube stations gets you nowhere. I forced myself on to the buses within a few weeks of arriving in London to help me understand how the place fitted together.

There are excellent bus maps on the TfL website - 5 large ones for different parts of London plus tube style "spider maps" for local areas showing what buses run from specific stops. You can obtain paper versions of the 5 large maps from TfL bus stations, libraries and some tube stations / all TfL Visitor Centres.

https://tfl.gov.uk/maps/bus

You can also get real time bus arrival time information from the TfL website and there is a myriad of smartphone apps that give access to the bus and rail real time journey information. The live bus info is a real godsend in helping you to time your trip to the bus stop and not have too long a wait time. Alternatively it tells you've got 20 mins to wait. ;)

There is no such thing as a "comfortable" peak time journey if you work in the centre of town and have to travel in. You will be crushed in with thousands of other people doing the same thing. Even in the City you will find yourself in torrents of pedestrians flowing along main roads and across bridges.

The ticketing is relatively straightforward. If your commuting is 5 days a week and you're also using the tubes, trains and buses for leisure purposes then a Travelcard (an unlimited journey multi modal ticket) will be the best deal. You must have a Travelcard covering ALL of the zones you travel through on the rail network. Buses are a flat fare, single zone mode. A Travelcard gives you ALL TfL buses in Greater London plus those few services that run into Surrey, Essex, Herts and Slough. You will need an Oyster Card for your Travelcard ticket. You can also load a cash balance on the card in case you need to pay an extension fare if you travel beyond the zones on your Travelcard ticket.

If you can afford to commit to a longer period ticket then it is cheaper than buying a weekly ticket all the time.

A monthly costs 3.84 times the weekly price so you get a discount compared to 4 weeklies.
An annual ticket costs 40 times the weekly price so you get 12 weeks "free" but you will need to consider your holidays and whether they'll be spent in London or elsewhere.

It is worth bearing in mind that if you choose to use a contactless payment card it initially charges a daily capped charge and then will see if you have exceeded the 7 day (Mon - Sun) cap and give a reduction for that. There is NO capping for periods longer than 7 days at the moment. You will need to assess how much travel you are doing and what combination works best for you - a Travelcard or just using PAYG and being capped as necessary.

Have fun exploring London.
 

StateOfPlay

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All depends on your budget. London is expensive.

If you can afford it, Islington is nice. You can ride Angel to Bank in a few minutes and be refreshed and ready for work in the city.

If it has to be cheaper then Camden is a pretty "hip" place to live, a great advert for the suburbs of London. Although if you prefer peace and quiet you might want to go a bit further out to East Finchley.
 
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Denzo

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All depends on your budget. London is expensive.

If you can afford it, Islington is nice. You can ride Angel to Bank in a few minutes and be refreshed and ready for work in the city.

If it has to be cheaper then Camden is a pretty "hip" place to live, a great advert for the suburbs of London. Although if you prefer peace and quiet you might want to go a bit further out to East Finchley.

Camden might be the bookies favourite at the moment. I've been primarily looking at three places: Camden, Shoreditch and Clapham.

Camden seems to be good for clubbing at the weekends and stuff. I'm not really into peace and quiet, I like to get my work done during the week then enjoy myself at the weekends. Camden seems to be fairly trendy for people my age, good amenities and not a million miles from work. Of course, it's dependent on the numbers adding up.

Shoreditch I'm becoming less keen on than I originally was. Very close to work, walkable in fact, decent nightlife. However I'd still want to use the tue for getting around to other activities and maybe I'd struggle to get the benefit of an oyster card in Shoreditch and it's surrounding areas.

Clapham is an interesting case. Looks like a very happening place, bit further away from work though and I've heard that not many young people live south of the Thames
 

deltic

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You may find this map of London rents interesting ...
http://media.timeout.com/images/102882214/image.jpg

The map is the rent for one bedroom flats.
--- old post above --- --- new post below ---
Camden might be the bookies favourite at the moment. I've been primarily looking at three places: Camden, Shoreditch and Clapham.

Camden seems to be good for clubbing at the weekends and stuff. I'm not really into peace and quiet, I like to get my work done during the week then enjoy myself at the weekends. Camden seems to be fairly trendy for people my age, good amenities and not a million miles from work. Of course, it's dependent on the numbers adding up.

Shoreditch I'm becoming less keen on than I originally was. Very close to work, walkable in fact, decent nightlife. However I'd still want to use the tue for getting around to other activities and maybe I'd struggle to get the benefit of an oyster card in Shoreditch and it's surrounding areas.

Clapham is an interesting case. Looks like a very happening place, bit further away from work though and I've heard that not many young people live south of the Thames

Camden is now full of tourists going to Camden Lock. Clapham is full of young people as well as young couples. The Northern line at Clapham is rammed and you can easily wait for quite a few trains to go through before you get on when travelling at the height of the peak. Balham is cheaper and Tooting more so and is very asian centric if that appeals.
 

theironroad

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You have a degree, are in your twenties and have secured a job in the City......and you need help with the logistics of a public transport system. I'm not sure whether to laugh or cry tbh.
 

W-on-Sea

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That very low rental figure for Redbridge can't possibly be right, surely. If it is, I'd head there in a heartbeat. It's not the most happening neighbourhood (purely residential), but it's considerably more pleasant than most parts of East London.
--- old post above --- --- new post below ---
(I'm also not convinced that the large discrepancy in rents between Plaistow and East Ham on the one hand, and Upton Park on the other, can be right. I'd not choose to live in any of them, and on balance Upton Park almost certainly is the roughest of the three, even if Plaistow is more run-down...) Basically I am far from convinced by the probable accuracy of the figures on that map....
 

Paule23

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You have a degree, are in your twenties and have secured a job in the City......and you need help with the logistics of a public transport system. I'm not sure whether to laugh or cry tbh.


I love this reply. On the one hand it's rather rude and condescending to someone who has come to the forum asking for help, on the other, you do have a point......
 

deltic

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I love this reply. On the one hand it's rather rude and condescending to someone who has come to the forum asking for help, on the other, you do have a point......

I disagree - London's transport system is very different - does anywhere else in UK allow you to use contactless cards which has a different capping system than oyster PAYG which is different from travelcards. In addition unless you ask it is virtually impossible to get information on how crowded various rail routes are. So on paper what looks an easy commute actually becomes very difficult if you have to wait 10-15 mins before you can get on a train.
 

Rup

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I disagree - London's transport system is very different - does anywhere else in UK allow you to use contactless cards which has a different capping system than oyster PAYG which is different from travelcards. In addition unless you ask it is virtually impossible to get information on how crowded various rail routes are. So on paper what looks an easy commute actually becomes very difficult if you have to wait 10-15 mins before you can get on a train.

Yes, the nuances of the London transport are only obvious to those who use it regularly.
 
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glbotu

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While I appreciate the fares system is somewhat complicated, limiting your living options to somewhere where you don't have to change trains/modes is somewhat short sighted in London.

In terms of nice places to live that aren't suburbia/commuter belt (assuming you have the money for it), you have:

Islington. It's pricey but definitely nice to live in, while still being quite "buzzing". Hop on the NCL or Northern Line.

Maida Vale. This will require changes of train (probably start with Bakerloo to Oxford Circus, Central to Bank, but move swiftly onto Bakerloo to Paddington, Crossrail to Liverpool Street once that's open), but also nice to live in, while still being inner-city.

Dulwich. Direct SE Trains to Cannon Street. A bit less "friendly" as a location.

Fulham (North End Road - rather than Chelsea), also pricey, but is where a lot of UCL students live. Probably District to Notting Hill Gate, Central to Bank (or if you really hate changing trains, sit on the District Line for an interminable amount of time).

Camden (Northern Line).

Shepherd's Bush (although that's getting pricier by the second, Central Line)

If you don't mind being a bit further afield, you've got Wembley (Met), Walthamstow (LO into Liverpool St) and Croydon (walk from London Bridge, it's a very short walk to Bank from there).
 

urpert

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While I appreciate the fares system is somewhat complicated, limiting your living options to somewhere where you don't have to change trains/modes is somewhat short sighted in London.

Dulwich. Direct SE Trains to Cannon Street. A bit less "friendly" as a location.

Not Cannon St - Victoria (from West Dulwich) or London Bridge (from North/East Dulwich).
 

telstarbox

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Camden might be the bookies favourite at the moment. I've been primarily looking at three places: Camden, Shoreditch and Clapham.

Camden seems to be good for clubbing at the weekends and stuff. I'm not really into peace and quiet, I like to get my work done during the week then enjoy myself at the weekends. Camden seems to be fairly trendy for people my age, good amenities and not a million miles from work. Of course, it's dependent on the numbers adding up.

Shoreditch I'm becoming less keen on than I originally was. Very close to work, walkable in fact, decent nightlife. However I'd still want to use the tue for getting around to other activities and maybe I'd struggle to get the benefit of an oyster card in Shoreditch and it's surrounding areas.

Clapham is an interesting case. Looks like a very happening place, bit further away from work though and I've heard that not many young people live south of the Thames

Young people live everywhere!

Is there a Facebook group for your graduate intake - ask where other people are moving to?

A rule of thumb often cited is to spend no more than a third of take home pay on rent - and obviously less than that if you want to save up money.

You've said Shoreditch and Camden which suggest a very decent starting salary :), but that in turn suggests long hours so would you prefer a shorter trip to and from work if that was the case?
 
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Robertj21a

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I disagree - London's transport system is very different - does anywhere else in UK allow you to use contactless cards which has a different capping system than oyster PAYG which is different from travelcards. In addition unless you ask it is virtually impossible to get information on how crowded various rail routes are. So on paper what looks an easy commute actually becomes very difficult if you have to wait 10-15 mins before you can get on a train.

I agree with you, London's transport system is very different to elsewhere in the UK (but very simple once you understand it). I also don't live in, or commute to, London but it only took 1-2 trips to understand Oyster, and contactless is the same as outside London (shops/coffee etc).

As a matter of interest, where are you moving from ?

Don't underestimate just how busy the tubes and buses are in London. You will either be jammed in tight much of the time, or waiting quite a while for anything to turn up with a bit of space. If you haven't experienced travelling around London very much before then I fear you have rather a shock coming.
 

Denzo

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Young people live everywhere!

Is there a Facebook group for your graduate intake - ask where other people are moving to?

A rule of thumb often cited is to spend no more than a third of take home pay on rent - and obviously less than that if you want to save up money.

You've said Shoreditch and Camden which suggest a very decent starting salary :), but that in turn suggests long hours so would you prefer a shorter trip to and from work if that was the case?



I should be on 9-5 hours :)
--- old post above --- --- new post below ---
I agree with you, London's transport system is very different to elsewhere in the UK (but very simple once you understand it). I also don't live in, or commute to, London but it only took 1-2 trips to understand Oyster, and contactless is the same as outside London (shops/coffee etc).

As a matter of interest, where are you moving from ?

Don't underestimate just how busy the tubes and buses are in London. You will either be jammed in tight much of the time, or waiting quite a while for anything to turn up with a bit of space. If you haven't experienced travelling around London very much before then I fear you have rather a shock coming.



At the moment I live in Glasgow, grew up in the Scottish Highlands
 

StateOfPlay

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9-5 Hours, sounds cushy. Especially in the City.

Personally I would do a short term let, maybe rent a room at first. That way you can get used to London, used to the area, find out where your colleagues at work live and recommend.

London is unique, due to it's size and grandeur. 8.6 million people live in London, 4 million use the Tube every day. Sometimes it feels like all 4 million squeezed into one train carriage :)

So your best bet is to be flexible, be prepared to move, to change routes etc.

And best of luck to you too! But be prepared for the cost of the first round of drinks you buy hahahha
 

coupwotcoup

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and I've heard that not many young people live south of the Thames

Haha...quality. Just go up to the top of the Shard and look North then the other way....south of the river is like the dark side of the moon... :D.

Just one thing to remember..don't stand on the left hand side of an escalator...this is London so learn the rules...sharpish... :p
 

Busaholic

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While I appreciate the fares system is somewhat complicated,

Dulwich. Direct SE Trains to Cannon Street. A bit less "friendly" as a location.

There are three people who fully understand the complexities of the fares system(s) in London, and one of those is dead, another has been driven mad by it all and now resides in Bedlam (easily accessible from Eden Park, by the way, which is another area that could be explored) and the third could well reside on this forum:)

West Dulwich is not cheap, but my sister lived there for twenty years until fairly recently and I never heard of any street attacks and precious few burglaries, although no-one would describe it as the most exciting of places.
 

plcd1

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Maybe, but the busiest times on public transport are 8-9 am and 5-6 pm, so presumably most people work 9-5.

Well yes but the AM peak runs from 6 until about 10 and the PM peak begins about 1530 with school chucking out time and can stretch to almost 2000 depending on how many people go for a drink after work. Sure the absolute worst is in the hourly periods you quote but the peak has spread hugely.

The other emerging factor is that Saturdays and Sundays are now busier than M-F inter peak which is pretty terrifying too.

A lot of people are on longer than the traditional 8 hour day too.
 

coupwotcoup

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Try and watch a film called 'Death Line' circa 1973/4...should prepare you well :D
"Mind the gap" - aaaaargghhhhh.......

Also, don't get sucked in by televisual licence as seen in the Sherlock episode 'The empty hearse', when just
ONE person gets on the last train at Westminster....yeah right. :roll:
 

MikeWh

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and contactless is the same as outside London (shops/coffee etc).

Well not quite. With shops it is possible to require you to enter your PIN if you've done too many contactless transactions, so they know it's still you using the card. This won't happen on TfL transport. Also, it's possible in certain circumstances to run up a daily charge more than the contactless limit.
 

StateOfPlay

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Maybe, but the busiest times on public transport are 8-9 am and 5-6 pm, so presumably most people work 9-5.

I worked in the City, we were not "office workers" in the typical 9-5 sense, and the hours expected (not contracted) were around 10- 14 hours a day. It is why I quit.

Might be different nowadays, and I suppose it could depend on the role you are doing in the City, but most of my old work colleagues still talk about the long hours.
 

Robertj21a

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I should be on 9-5 hours :)
--- old post above --- --- new post below ---




At the moment I live in Glasgow, grew up in the Scottish Highlands


I love the Highlands, been there many times and worked in Inverness for a while. You really will find life in London so very different. Obviously, it's manageable, and will be quite exciting to start with, but it can get very draining day after day. Personally, I'd just find a place to rent short term while you get a better idea of what you want/where you need to go/how the tubes, buses and DLR work etc.
 
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