MY Great Eastern Preview

Status
Not open for further replies.
Sponsor Post - registered members do not see these adverts; click here to register, or click here to log in
R

RailUK Forums

66526

Member
Joined
9 Nov 2005
Messages
332
Double yellow, single yellow, red is the correct sequence with 4 aspect. However, if the trainin front is moving then you may get the procession you describe however, you treat all double yellows as if the next signal is single yellow and all single yelloows as if the next is red.
 

16CSVT2700

Established Member
Joined
4 Sep 2005
Messages
1,835
Location
Gdansk
6-aspect?

I think you'll find the highest number of aspects (read: individual lights) on a signal head is 4. The sequence you described obviously means there is another service in front of your one and not "6-aspect" signalling.

Also it doesn't matter what particular area of the network it is, James is correct for as far as I know the rulebook states that drivers treat all double yellows as if the next is single yellow, and single yellows as if the next signal is a red, braking accordingly as if being slowed for a red signal.

The excuse "but it has always been <insert sequence here>" wouldn't look too good on a SPAD report now would it? ;)
 

Mole259

Member
Joined
12 Aug 2005
Messages
15
Location
camberley
Freightliners, oil tanks, speedlink freights, ballast trains.

It's just a shame MSTS doesn't support approach control, but no doubt KRS will.
I can assure it is possible to have approach control, it is implemented into SWL, and many others have also managed to implement it :)
 

Mole259

Member
Joined
12 Aug 2005
Messages
15
Location
camberley
Ah, a bit of confusion, thought you were implying that there was no form of approach control at all :)

There is some form of approach control, but i admit i haven't seen the red signal approach control
 

66526

Member
Joined
9 Nov 2005
Messages
332
Well no, the rule book doesn’t state that. It says ‘be *prepared* to find the next signal at caution’, it doesn't mean it will be! And there are such things as local instructions. :)

The phrase '6 aspect' is just the way I've used to describe the arrangement, I forget what people who have worked on that line actually call it. Not only have several people confirmed to me it exists who have/do work on that line, I've seen it with my own eyes.

Note: an aspect is an indication, nothing to do with the number of lights.

Anyway, that’s the arrangement of signalling on that line, you can argue all you like. Perhaps someone will similar knowledge would back me up, failing that go out and have a look yourself on a long straight. :)
Exactly, Jamie said that drivers are told to expect the next signal to be the next aspect down. You never assume that the next signal after receiving a double yellow will be another double yellow...
 
T

Tom

Guest
I have created quite an ingenious way of working junction approach control. I'm working on it in one of my activities for Dorset Coast 4.

Basically it involves an invisible piece of rolling stock over the conflicting route which clears the block just as you *should* be braking for the junction. As its invisible, you won't be able to see it at all and it can just be removed as soon as it clears the junction for the train. It also can be stuck on the junction by using wait points. :)
 

Sprog

Established Member
Joined
6 Sep 2005
Messages
1,315
Location
SPM
Er pass.

One moan I do have is the signalling is wrong. In reality, within the Greater London area, Drivers get the following aspects before a red:

Double yellow
Double yellow
Yellow
Yellow
then Red

..... but I know they used correct spacing just missed the fact there is actually 6 aspect signalling on the line, so signals get passed doing the right speed.
Err no?

This is total tosh, sorry, but whoever told you this is either stupid or pulling your leg.

In regards to your post above, i will speak to the two signallers i know who work in the Bouncey Castle [aka, Liverpool Street IECC] and ask them to clarify the arrangement of twin double yellows.

Howver, this is maybe just an enhancment that is applied to the 'urban' end of the GEML and it is deffinatly not reffered to as 6, or even 5 aspect signalling. These do not exist..!!

...though if i wanted to be really pedantic, i could technically say that 5 aspect signalling does infact exist, in the form on 'flashing greens' found between Peterborough and Stoke Summit on the ECML. These where implemented back under BR in connection with the '225' project for 140mph running without the need for expensive in-cab singalling.

But im not sure if '5 aspect' is the correct technical term for the flashing greens, and this is not used in everyday running and is purley for test puposes only.

ta,

Sproglett
 

Sprog

Established Member
Joined
6 Sep 2005
Messages
1,315
Location
SPM
...though if i wanted to be really pedantic, i could technically say that 5 aspect signalling does infact exist[/SIZE

But im not sure if '5 aspect' is the correct technical term for the flashing greens, and this is not used in everyday running and is purley for test puposes only.

ta,

Sproglett


See above.

oh, btw, what job do you do again?
 

devon_metro

Established Member
Joined
11 Oct 2005
Messages
7,561
Location
London
I think metroland means that generally when driving a driver will encounter a double yellow then istead of single yellow the next has cleared to double and so on. Am i right?
 

Respite

Member
Joined
30 Oct 2006
Messages
766
Location
Staffordshire
Ok so this double yellow's together thing must be a local instruction/working then? Something to go in box special instructions.I'm guessing that as far as a driver is concerned he passes the double yellow expecting a single yellow next as the "most" restrictive aspect he could have. In the same way that according to the defensive driving policy there is no such thing as a approach controlled signal.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Top