Myths about rail

Discussion in 'Infrastructure & Stations' started by Daniel Pyke, 17 Aug 2015.

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  1. Daniel Pyke

    Daniel Pyke Member

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    Sometime ago I suggested I would write some explanations about rail (the things wheels roll on not the whole industry). Ok it was quite some time ago I admit!

    So I've finally started to do some short blog type posts and the 1st of 5 of these are exposing some of the myths I get to hear about rail.

    Have a look and see what you think. All comments gratefully recieved and if you have ideas/requests for future articles then let me know.
    Original article with pictures.
    https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/5-myths-rails-part-1-daniel-pyke?trk=pulse_spock-articles

    Text below for reference:
     
    Last edited: 18 Aug 2015
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  3. najaB

    najaB Veteran Member

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    Do you work as a consultant in the rail industry?
     
  4. Daniel Pyke

    Daniel Pyke Member

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    Not anymore but I used to - yes.

    Then I looked after technical aspects of rail processing and inspection for UK rail production, and now I work for the same company but doing marketing for rail instead.
     
  5. sbt

    sbt Member

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  6. Ships

    Ships Member

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    To be fair on the network the vast majority of rail is either CEN56 or CEN60, 220 or 260 grade. On the secondary routes you get more of a mixture but most 109, 110lb etc has gone. Whilst rail hardness can really help in problem areas there are myriad Other factors effecting rail life, lubrication and having properly designed geometry being arguably more important.
     
  7. Daniel Pyke

    Daniel Pyke Member

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    Here is the second in in the series of blogs discussing hard vs soft rails and why neither should be referred to as "best"

    Original article with pictures and links can be found here:
    https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/5-myths-rails-part-2-hard-vs-soft-daniel-pyke

    --- old post above --- --- new post below ---
    Yes, modern steel manufacture methods and modern rail inspection equipment would have avoided that issue.

    All new rail from our mills are subject to a very thorough NDT inspection (more thorough than it'll likely ever see once installed in track).



    Don't forget the bullhead profile too (95RBH) it may be historic but we still make it!

    Most new rail is R260 or HP335 these days in the UK with a small amount of MHH grade occassionally for really wear prone areas. All factors play their part in rail life especially lubrication, and cant excess/deficiency and obviously rail grade too. All must work together to get the best life (value for money) out of the track.
     
  8. Ships

    Ships Member

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    Aye we're actually doing a renewal partially in bullhead next year!
     
  9. 380101

    380101 Member

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    Plenty of new bullhead rail on the Stranraer branch line been laid recently!
     
  10. richieb1971

    richieb1971 Established Member

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    Never understood why 4 track layouts like the MML have better fast lines than slow lines. There are noticeable differences just cosmetically. Also the slow lines are so bad in places that the freight that uses it bounces around a lot more.
     
  11. Daniel Pyke

    Daniel Pyke Member

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    The track alignment has to meet lower standards for slower speed track hence the slower routes tend to be more visibly "bumpy". To use a car analogy, imagine the difference hitting a speed bump on the motorway, compared to hitting a speed bump a 5mph in a car park. Thats why high speed routes have higher alignment (and indeed rail specifications).
     
  12. Daniel Pyke

    Daniel Pyke Member

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    Here is the third in the series of articles. (The original link has pictures and links within it that aren't included in the quoted text below).

    https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/5-my...s-faster-daniel-pyke?trk=pulse_spock-articles

     
  13. Daniel Pyke

    Daniel Pyke Member

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    Sorry I've been off work for a couple of weeks so appologies for the late update of this thread. Please find the two posts below for info. The originals in the link contain pictures which some may find interesting which I can't replicate in the quoted text.

    As usual any questions then let me know below or send me a message

    Cheers


    Do harder rails generate more RCF?
    https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/5-my...erate-more-rcf-daniel-pyke?trk=mp-author-card

    Pictures available in the original link above.

    Should networks just use one type of rail?
    https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/5-myths-rails-part-one-type-best-daniel-pyke?trk=mp-author-card

    Pictures available in the original link above.
     
    Last edited: 17 Sep 2015
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