N Gauge

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Michael.Y

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As an ex-00 modeller when I was younger, I am keen to get back into modelling when I get a house of my own. I still have all my OO kit back at my parents' house, but I've become aware of N-Gauge, and I like the fact it's smaller so therefore would take up less space. Is N-Gauge modelling any fundamentally different to 00? Are there any special approaches or techniques needed? My other question is how wide ranging are the N-gauge models - I'd probably want a few DMUs, an HST, 47s, 37s, perhaps a 66 or a 56, a couple of kettles plus of course scenery and infrastructure.

On my old OO gauge I have a 1-car pre-Swallow liveried HST, a 56, a Class 28, a couple of kettles (including a Princess Elizabeth), plus I believe a Pacer. I used to have pylons, platforms, bushes, footpaths and a tunnel - truly was a labour of love. Considering I was 10, it was a lot of fun to do.
 
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hairyhandedfool

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Because of the smaller wheels, electrical contact isn't as good in N gauge, but with regular track cleaning it shouldn't be a problem. Otherwise I think the only other real differences are the couplings and dcc decoder fitting.

Many of the models aren't detailed as well as the OO models, however, some are better.
 

Heinz57

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The techniques used for modeling are essentialy the same with N gauge and across any other scale. But you will need a very steady hand and get use to working with the very tiny items.

The range of N is quite wide, Graham Farish have an extensive range of both steam and modern suff, including HSTs and DMUs. Buildings are avalible from a variety of manufacturers, including Metcalfe and Hornby (Lydle End).

I'm not sure what the avaliblilty of road vehcles is like in N, I know there are some avalible from a few manufactuers, including Oxford Die Cast. But I'm not sure how big the range is.

Hope this helps,

Heinz
 

GB

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Its horses for courses about which gauge is more detailed. The likes of Dapol are very good but the kick is they dont have as many releases as Graham Farish which are good but not quite at Dapols level.

OO seems to have a wider selection and it seems to appear that manufacturers release OO before N.
 

STEVIEBOY1

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Many years ago I had OO gauge, but again owing to space problems I switched to N gauge which was fine, as mentioned above there is a very large range of product in N gauge, I was surprised how much infact when I was in Modelzone Kingston recently. Good Luck.
 
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I've recently started modelling in N-gauge; I wanted to 'play trains' and don't have the space for a decent OO layout. If you want to model anything diesel or electric the recent models from Graham Farish run beautifully. I have a model Deltic DP1 and a Class 108 DMU, both Deltic and the DMU power car have pickups on all axles which makes for very reliable electrical contact. Deltic also has drive to all six axles. Even on a basic DC controller they both run happily at low speeds. They're also beautifully detailed, far better than I was expecting.

My N-gauge steam locos are a bit more variable, they've all been bought second hand and some are better than others. Cleaning and light lubrication make all the difference, at least one of my kettles was transformed from terrible to almost faultless with a bit of TLC.

The lack of choice compared with more mainstream OO modelling is a bit of a drawback although it does depend what you want to model. Luckily for my layout - set in 1960s Warwickshire - I think all of the ex GWR locomotives I wanted were available ready to run.

I don't regret going for N gauge, I've already got plans for a larger layout - I'd never be able to build anything similar in OO.
 

MCW

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N gauge is great,

I will admit electrical contact can be variable on Kettles, but that can easily be solved with some maintenance and some slight modification should you wish to undertake it. (namely, add some pickups to tender wheels on older loco drive tender engines.)

It is a great scale and very fun, a wide variety of stuff and good options for modifications.
 

Michael.Y

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Well since this (now locked) thread http://railforums.co.uk/showthread.php?t=63425, I am in the final stages of purchasing my first house (yippee).

It has 4 bedrooms, one of which I am going to use as a man cave. Usual stuff - beer fridge, telly, stereo, poker table, loads of cool posters....

....and a railway. I did think about a shelf layout, but decided against it. So it's either a baseboard that I can store away vertically (which precludes any substantial detailing and involves a lot of setting-up time)....

...or, inspired by this video, a Ceiling Railway.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YeVtVcoa_3c

Obviously it won't be Thomas (hopefully!), but I would like something like that, in 00 gauge. Has anyone on here any experience in doing this sort of thing? Any tips, tricks etc with how to build it? How wide would the shelf have to be to have two tracks etc?

Any comments appreciated!
 

John Webb

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The current (March 2013, issue 749) of "Railway Modeller" has an article 'Tynebridge - a tale of suspense' in which a layout is suspended from the ceiling of a garage. The system described would seem to be close to your needs and may be worth looking at.
 

ryson357

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Hello I have a twin track test track up at that level I don't call it a layout as its just two circular tracks whith no points or anything .Its up there are the junk room is only nine foot by twelve and as I build kit locos I needed no toy town curves,so the only way to do it was to go above door hight,
the main downside is you can't see much from ground level especaly the inner track,so I stand on the bed or the workbench chair if I need to watch or put anything on the track. and the main worry is a derailment followed by a swift flying lesson so I put a Perspex screen on the front and a plywood back painted skyblue which not only does the same job but stiffens up the trackbed on its trip around the brackets Not perfect but a can run.trains
 

507 001

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I would suggest that if you already hav some OO stuff, it would probably be worthwhile sticking with OO.

Having modelled in OO and G/16mm since I was 5 I'm probably a bit biased but N guage just doesn't do anything for me.

For a start it is frequently just as expensive or in some cases more expensive than OO, doesn't run as well as OO and is nearly always not as detailed as current OO offerings (which is to be expected really).

I find it looks quite odd sat on the track as the rails and sleepers are very tall and wheels are very often very wide, although it is improving.

My younger brother models in N, so I do have some experience with it.
 

Michael.Y

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Yup I'm planning it in OO - not only have I got OO stuff extant, but also if I do build a ceiling railway as planned, I will want to actually see it from below!
 
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