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NHS Awarded the George Cross

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AlterEgo

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The Queen has awarded the George Cross to the NHS as the health service marks its 73rd anniversary on Monday.


In a personal message, the Queen said NHS staff across the UK had worked "with courage, compassion and dedication" for more than 70 years.


NHS England chief executive Sir Simon Stevens said the award recognised the "skill and fortitude" of staff.


The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge are hosting a Buckingham Palace tea later to thank NHS workers.


The George Cross, instituted by King George VI in 1940 during the height of the Blitz in World War Two, is awarded for "acts of the greatest heroism or of the most courage in circumstances of extreme danger”


New and unplumbed depths of national worship, in my view. I’ve posted this here rather than in General Discussion because it seems to me to be a direct reaction to the pandemic.
 
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bramling

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New and unplumbed depths of national worship, in my view. I’ve posted this here rather than in General Discussion because it seems to me to be a direct reaction to the pandemic.

To be honest, I find it rather offensive given the number of people who have died, many of whom became infected within NHS settings.

The family I know whose mother was dumped in a room, given an oxygen mask, and had a nurse stick their head round the door every couple of hours, and who had to badger incessantly just to get an extra pillow, will for one be unimpressed - in fact that’s an understatement.
 

duncanp

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New and unplumbed depths of national worship, in my view. I’ve posted this here rather than in General Discussion because it seems to me to be a direct reaction to the pandemic.

I agree with your sentiments.

It makes out that all NHS staff are "heroes", and the various church services being held today confirm that worship of the NHS is fast becoming the new national religion.

What about all the various scandals that have beset the NHS in recent years, not to mention the fact the Jimmy Savile affair, where abuse was taking place in hospitals, staff knew about it, and no-one did anything about it.

Nor should we forget the millions of people who struggle to get a GP appointment every day, and when they do it is only a telephone call. And then there are those who have to wait months just to see a consultant, let alone get any treatment.

It wouldn't surprise me if 5th July is made a public holiday in the next few years.
 

LAX54

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I agree with your sentiments.

It makes out that all NHS staff are "heroes", and the various church services being held today confirm that worship of the NHS is fast becoming the new national religion.

What about all the various scandals that have beset the NHS in recent years, not to mention the fact the Jimmy Savile affair, where abuse was taking place in hospitals, staff knew about it, and no-one did anything about it.

Nor should we forget the millions of people who struggle to get a GP appointment every day, and when they do it is only a telephone call. And then there are those who have to wait months just to see a consultant, let alone get any treatment.

It wouldn't surprise me if 5th July is made a public holiday in the next few years.
I see in the papers that the GP appointment thing maybe here to stay in some form, with GP's doing 50% of consultations over the phone !
 

duncanp

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I see in the papers that the GP appointment thing maybe here to stay in some form, with GP's doing 50% of consultations over the phone !

50% of consultations over the phone is an improvement over 100% of consultations over the phone.

Having said that, I do believe there is a place for telephone consultations.

Things like discussing test results, or general medical advice, can be done over the phone, and for some people phone consultations are more convenient as it saves them having to go to the surgery.

But it should be up to the patient to choose the most appropriate consultation method.
 

Huntergreed

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The NHS has essentially become a National “deity”, with it now being a requirement for us all to be seen to “respect” it (through visual measures like masks which don’t really work) and “protect” it (by sacrificing various aspects of our personal life to ensure the NHS is “protected”)

It is becoming the national religion of the UK. From expecting us to lock ourselves in our homes to protect it, to making us clap and to show our respect and, even some people going further and posting positive propaganda about it all over social media to show their level of respect and dedication towards it.

It’s a very dangerous and unhealthy position to be in. The NHS is a service (which we DO pay for) and should be viewed as such, not some sacred entity worthy of sacrificing aspects of our lives for prolonged periods of time to protect.
 

ainsworth74

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It's easier to deify it than it is to try and fund it properly and/or ensure that it's being run efficiently (actually efficient as well rather than just pretending your latest reform will improve efficiency and value for money whilst probably doing the opposite).
 

Bantamzen

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50% of consultations over the phone is an improvement over 100% of consultations over the phone.

Having said that, I do believe there is a place for telephone consultations.

Things like discussing test results, or general medical advice, can be done over the phone, and for some people phone consultations are more convenient as it saves them having to go to the surgery.

But it should be up to the patient to choose the most appropriate consultation method.
My wife has spent the last two hours trying to get an appointment with her GP. She finally got through a few minutes ago, they advised going to A&E as there are no doctors available to do video calls. She's calling about some advice for some arthritis she has in her finger, not really appropriate for A&E really, especially if doctor's surgeries around the place are dumping all and sundry there. They've also offered the option of a push doctor, but that's not working properly either....

Definitely worthy of an honour this system that we now have. This isn't a go at the staff in case someone takes offence, but the NHS is still very much far from business as usual if you don't have covid.
 

Baxenden Bank

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Is this the same NHS that sent untested (and therefore a reasonable suspicion of being infected) people into care homes in order to clear wards for incoming casualties? Or is it a different NHS?
 

kristiang85

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The NHS has essentially become a National “deity”, with it now being a requirement for us all to be seen to “respect” it (through visual measures like masks which don’t really work) and “protect” it (by sacrificing various aspects of our personal life to ensure the NHS is “protected”)

It is becoming the national religion of the UK. From expecting us to lock ourselves in our homes to protect it, to making us clap and to show our respect and, even some people going further and posting positive propaganda about it all over social media to show their level of respect and dedication towards it.

It’s a very dangerous and unhealthy position to be in. The NHS is a service (which we DO pay for) and should be viewed as such, not some sacred entity worthy of sacrificing aspects of our lives for prolonged periods of time to protect.

Quite. It's quite clear that the NHS is not fit for purpose in its current form, and needs huge reform. Sadly so much has been spaffed up the wall, I'm not sure it's going to happen anytime soon.

It's a wonderful concept and something the UK should be proud of, but it's structure and operations still seem rooted in the past, due to many of its zealous defenders being so paranoid they will lose it that the reforms just never happen.

I've certainly seen it become a cult-like institution in the past year; the definition of a cult being: "a system of religious veneration and devotion directed towards a particular figure or object.".
 

MotCO

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50% of consultations over the phone is an improvement over 100% of consultations over the phone.

Having said that, I do believe there is a place for telephone consultations.

Things like discussing test results, or general medical advice, can be done over the phone, and for some people phone consultations are more convenient as it saves them having to go to the surgery.

But it should be up to the patient to choose the most appropriate consultation method.

There were plans a few years ago to introduce telephone consultations, and I can see the benefits of this - if it is a minor issue or you need tests results interpreted etc, then you can carry on with your daily routine without having to cart yourself off to the surgery and wait in a waiting room. But not all appointments are suitable for telephone consultations.

I used to work in the NHS (not front-line), but retired just as Covid struck. Does that mean I have the George Cross? :s
 

johntea

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I work for the NHS and certainly don't feel like I need 'rewarding' constantly for just doing the job I am paid to do

Today for example a big deal is being made out of our tea break for whatever reason!
 

Darandio

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Certainly much easier than paying them what they deserve. What a load of old bollocks.
 

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I am sure that a proper pay rise would be preferred by the staff.

Deifying the NHS is being used by the politicians in charge, who are ultimately responsible for many of the organisational failings, financial problems and bad decisions that are laid at the NHS’ door, to avoid blame. Any criticism, constructive or otherwise, is met with a, ‘How dare you criticise heroes’, response from politicians and their appointees rather than an answer. Individual staff may make mistakes, but politicians, etc. can really cack things up on a large scale.
 
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Baxenden Bank

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According to this source:
NHS workforce statistics March 2021

The NHS had 1,197,747 FTE (full time equivalents) staff in March 2021 (5.1% (58,325) more than in March 2020).

So, if they each have a physical hold of the medal for one hour each, how long will it take for it to get around everyone?

PS the figures are for England only.
 

Welly

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I work for the NHS and certainly don't feel like I need 'rewarding' constantly for just doing the job I am paid to do
Same here! I noticed that my local NHS Trust management made no comment whatsoever about this gimmick of the GC.

I also remembered that the RUC was awarded the GC in 1999 - it was then disbanded and turned into the PSNI.... so I expect the NHS to be turned into the Health Service of England soon - HSE!
 

43096

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This just de-values the George Cross in my opinion.
I think that's an understatement. Frankly this award is just disgusting.

As a reminder the George Cross is (or should be) awarded for "acts of the greatest heroism or of the most conspicuous courage in circumstances of extreme danger." None of that applies to the NHS.

Compare and contrast with other recipients of the George Cross: Wallace Oakes, John Axon and Jane Harrison are but three civilian examples.
 

AlterEgo

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I think that's an understatement. Frankly this award is just disgusting.

As a reminder the George Cross is (or should be) awarded for "acts of the greatest heroism or of the most conspicuous courage in circumstances of extreme danger." None of that applies to the NHS.

Compare and contrast with other recipients of the George Cross: Wallace Oakes, John Axon and Jane Harrison are but three civilian examples.
It really is appalling. Much as I resent the political award of the medal to the RUC some years ago, as well, at the very least you could say their officers did indeed have a very long campaign against mortal danger from terrorists.

Your three examples are exactly who I'd think of when considering George Cross awards.
 

nlogax

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Surely the best way to recognise the efforts of an organisation working hard to minimise the effects of a pandemic is to fund it properly in future. Maybe that's me being absurdly reductionist but there we are.
 

ainsworth74

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Surely the best way to recognise the efforts of an organisation working hard to minimise the effects of a pandemic is to fund it properly in future. Maybe that's me being absurdly reductionist but there we are.
Yes but that's complicated and expensive. Awarding the GC generates some positive press coverage and costs nothing.
 

kristiang85

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Next time I'm barked at by an NHS jobsworth receptionist I'll give them reverence as they are a partial George Cross winner...
 

brad465

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Is this the same NHS that sent untested (and therefore a reasonable suspicion of being infected) people into care homes in order to clear wards for incoming casualties? Or is it a different NHS?
To be fair that was largely the Government not doing enough to stop that happening and also them not resourcing it adequately for over a decade to provide the capacity to keep them in, or at the very least Hancock making a stupid remark about a "protective ring" around them. If the NHS were largely responsible for that care homes' debacle then Hancock effectively volunteered to take the blame with what he said.
 
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