Oddities of the English language?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Howardh, 8 Jan 2020.

  1. Bayum

    Bayum Established Member

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    Tense type kills me :(
     
  2. headshot119

    headshot119 Established Member

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    Don't forget that you can refuse to take out the refuse!
     
  3. DaleCooper

    DaleCooper Established Member

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    If a bomb's fuse is faulty do you refuse it?
     
  4. Howardh

    Howardh Established Member

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    Buses or busses?
     
  5. Strat-tastic

    Strat-tastic Member

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    Stranger or weirder?
     
  6. pdeaves

    pdeaves Established Member

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    Many years ago at work, some drawings were printed out and signed by someone senior in the evening. Then, someone spotted an error or needed to change something. Either way, the relevant drawings were reprinted and left for the senior person to sign in the morning with a note "please resign here". Obviously, the intention was "please sign the drawings again" but the word resign had other connotations!
     
  7. SteveP29

    SteveP29 Member

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    Stepkids always say thgey're going to take a shower.

    I always ask 'where are you taking it?' as my education in that was to say, I'm going for a shower, or I'm having a shower

    Gone

    Shouldn't resign have had a hyphen in it to make it re- sign?
     
  8. pdeaves

    pdeaves Established Member

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    Maybe, but that wasn't what was written on the Post-It. Should 'reprint' thus have a hyphen for the same reason? Re-sign = sign again, re-print = print again.
     
  9. krus_aragon

    krus_aragon Established Member

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    My father, as a teacher, was often asked "can I borrow some glue?" He'd typically respond "sure, as long as you put it back in the pot afterward."
     
  10. Cowley

    Cowley Established Member

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    Reminds me of the time I said to a rather posh tweedy jacketed red trousered chap in Salisbury “You wouldn’t know the way to railway station would you?”*
    He replied “Well would I, or wouldn’t I!?”

    As I walked away having administered an atomic wedgie I did think that maybe he had a point.

    *Even now I’m thinking that I’ve probably made a mistake with where I’ve placed things like my “ and ? etc.
     
  11. DaleCooper

    DaleCooper Established Member

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    Your punctuation looks fine to me, apart from the unnecessary comma.
     
  12. talltim

    talltim Established Member

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    I say cone to rhyme with scone...
     
  13. Cowley

    Cowley Established Member

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    Ok. I’ll have to leave it now but thanks.
     
  14. 61653 HTAFC

    61653 HTAFC Established Member

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    Another planet...
    And a bandage can be wound around a wound!

    And I've started a sentence with "and"... (twice) ;)
     
  15. DaleCooper

    DaleCooper Established Member

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    ... and an ellipsis at the beginning is the trick I use.
     
  16. 61653 HTAFC

    61653 HTAFC Established Member

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    The "Trumpian Ellipsis" (more than three points, no space at the end) seems to be growing in popularity......not good!......
     
  17. Howardh

    Howardh Established Member

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    I think that's legal now, isn't it??
    Dunno who decides these things, probably the makers of the Oxford dictionary. Wonder if any words get removed from it over the years and why?? I'd love to bring a few out-of-use words back to life?
     
  18. krus_aragon

    krus_aragon Established Member

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    Nope. The Oxford English Dictionary is descriptive (it notes how other people use the langauge) rather than prescriptive (creating the rules of how people should use the language). There's no such body (like the Académie Francaise) for English.
     
  19. scotrail158713

    scotrail158713 Member

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    I think it is actually grammatically correct in some circumstances - not nearly as many as it’s used for though.
     
  20. DaleCooper

    DaleCooper Established Member

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    Songwriters and poets are allowed to get away with it.

    Walk Away Renée
    Jerusalem
     
  21. DaleCooper

    DaleCooper Established Member

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    ... and Led Zeppelin - What is and What Never Should Be
     
  22. Lucan

    Lucan Member

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    "It is more than my job's worth to [eg] let you ride without buying a ticket."
    What is really meant is that it is less than the job is worth. Ie, keeping the job is more valuable than someone getting a free ride.
     
  23. Busaholic

    Busaholic Established Member

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    The original Left Banke version is on my Desert Island Discs selection: I still have the Philips 45.
     
  24. Cowley

    Cowley Established Member

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    Does anyone know why ‘Monger’ is only used before - Iron/Fish/cheese etc?
    Not tickets/beer or manure?
    It’s always seemed like a strange hang up to me.
     
  25. TRAX

    TRAX Member

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    It’s the same in French, although saying "against" is also correct but not necessarily used more.

    Also: E0315ADF-4565-4A03-B6D5-8B65A591A721.jpeg
     
  26. Calthrop

    Calthrop Established Member

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    Interesting thought -- I've never seen it that way be fore. Of course, one can (semi)-humorously coin "monger" words ad lib.

    There's a very funny little book called How To Be An Alien, by one George Mikes -- a Hungarian refugee in Britain in the World War II era. Published shortly after that war, it's a humorous "guide" for other expatriates, to the oddities of British life. In the section on the strangeness of the English language, the author muses briefly on the "monger" thing -- to the effect of, "A fishmonger mongs fish. The ironmonger and the warmonger do the same with iron and war. They all mong them."
     
  27. Howardh

    Howardh Established Member

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    I'm on my PC now. Well, no I'm not, I'm sat in front of it, if I were on it it would break!!
     
  28. krus_aragon

    krus_aragon Established Member

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    Either that, or he'd arrest you!
     
  29. najaB

    najaB Veteran Member

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    This reminds me of a couple of videos I saw recently...

     
  30. Busaholic

    Busaholic Established Member

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    I have a friend who works as a supermarket cashier. She always refers to her relief cashier 'jumping on the till' and I've heard the phrase being used in other supermarkets too, often shortened to 'will you jump on for me please?' My friend is not a lightweight, and any jumping years she had are well behind her at age 71.
     

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