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Pancake day

Mojo

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I’m surprised by the number of people I’ve seen on social media who consider that the time to eat pancakes today is as either breakfast / brunch or as the dessert for their dinner (evening meal). Whilst I’m quite partial to nice thick buttermilk American pancakes for breakfast, these seem to be people eating flat pancakes.

I say this as I’ve always considered pancakes to be a meal in their own right and will be having them for my dinner this evening.

What do you do in your household?
 
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nlogax

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Been making buttermilk pancakes for years so I always have a bottle of *Aunt Jemima on standby. For crêpe it's hard to go wrong with sugar and lemon juice. However it's a well known fact that the best pancakes contain crispy duck, cucumber, spring onion and hoisin sauce, and don't need to be scoffed one day per year ;)



*about to be rebranded, surprised it's taken so long
 

gnolife

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I'm doing two batches of (flat) pancakes, one for dinner, which I'm filling with cheese, tomato & mushroom, and one for dessert, which we'll just be dumping our preferred sweet filling on.
 

A Challenge

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I'm doing two batches of (flat) pancakes, one for dinner, which I'm filling with cheese, tomato & mushroom, and one for dessert, which we'll just be dumping our preferred sweet filling on.
That is how I'm used to it working myself as well.
 

J-2739

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Only one of Aldi's best lemon pancakes which I popped into the toaster this morning, to commemorate the occasion...
 

DarloRich

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what are "buttermilk" pancakes? ( in fact what the actual f is buttermilk?) What are "flat" pancakes? have we moved to the USA? Oh, and its shrove Tuesday not pancake day ;) ( no, i have no idea what a shrove is either or why it gets a Tuesday)

Flour, eggs and milk are all you need to use. Packet mix if lazy.

Simples: 100g plain flour, 2 large eggs, 300ml milk, into a bowl, then whisk to a smooth batter. Best practice is to let your batter rest. You don't want a tired batter. Decent quality frying pan, touch of fat, decent but not roasting heat. 1 minute each side. Loads of sugar based products poured onto the finished product. Jobs a good un. Repeat until diabetes sets in.
 
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Mojo

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what are "buttermilk" pancakes?
They’re the thicker “breakfast” style pancakes, as opposed to the traditional ones eaten in the UK (that I thought were for dinner).
 

nlogax

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They are American style pancakes I suspect. Quite thick and fluffy? They must have some bicarb of soda in to make them rise a touch.
Yes. Turns them into both a great sponge for pancake syrup and a perfect load-bearing platform for crispy bacon.
 

Mojo

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Yes. Turns them into both a great sponge for pancake syrup and a perfect load-bearing platform for crispy bacon.
I didn't get my American holiday last year; I really missed this :( With lashings of syrup on top too!
 

GusB

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I had completely forgotten about pancake day. I prefer just having butter on mine, and they should look like this:

 

ComUtoR

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No measure method :

Chuck some flour in a bowl
Add 1 Egg (whisk first)
Pour in a small amount of milk

Whisk like crazy. Slowly add milk, Whisk like crazy, add more milk, keep whisking. When your batter is at the consistency you want (personal preference), stop adding milk.

Tips and tricks :

  • 1 egg is usually more than you need. Get a decent sized egg and you don't need two. This prevent the batter from tasting to "eggy" Its also better to make multiple batches than one big giant mixture.
  • When you have your personal consistency make sure you whisk it to within an inch of its life. When the surface has lots of small bubbles that dont pop then your good to go. This will give you a lighter pancake and if your making any American style or Drop scone it will give you a better fluffy texture.
  • Lard is awesome. The modern stuff has almost no flavour and Lard can take much higher temperatures. Always choose an oil that has a higher smoke point. You can be pretty frugal with your oil and just use enough to coat the pan. Too much and you will burn the edges of your pancake.
  • Hot is good, scorching is bad. The old fashioned way (I was taught) was to heat the pan till the oil starts to smoke and then turn the pan off. That way you are using the residual heat to cook the pancake rather than cooking it or burning it.
  • Use a griddle pan or a good solid heavy based pan. They retain the heat more and dont warp. The modern crepe/pancake pans tend to be thin and can burn the pancakes
  • Use a Deep ladle ! spoon off the edges so you dont drip anywhere. Dont overfill it. Keep the ladle nice and low in the pan and then a small twist of the wrist, slowly pour into the centre. DO NOT move the ladle all over the place. If you keep the ladle pouring the batter into the centre of the pan it will slowly drift outwards and form a pretty decent circle.
  • Dont panic, just watch the pancake cooking, when you start to see small bubbles forming all over the surface and the batter changes colour, its ready to flip/turn.

Alternatives :

Use self raising flour for the American/Drop scone style. (Baking powder/Bicarb not really needed)
Add some caster sugar in the batter for a little sweetness.


My preference is Scotch Pancakes (Drop scones) with a little bit of lemon and sugar. We always eat ours fresh from the pan. Just drop onto a plate and let the kids do what they want. I just keep cracking out the pancakes and they keep giving me empty plates. My Daughter makes awesome pancakes :)


Happy Pancake Day.
 

takno

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I had proper flat pancakes (from a packet) for breakfast. I like to have a proper meal for my tea, and didn't have anything else for breakfast, so it makes sense. I notice my brother makes flat pancakes for breakfast for his kids now, and they work very well for that.

Much as I prefer them flat, I did watch a polish channel video the other day where they made them thick and "American Style" by whisking the egg whites, and the effect looked pretty damn good.
 

Peter C

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We've always had pancakes just after our 'evening meal' (tea). They're basic flat things, either made from pre-made mix or homemade if we're feeling fancy. Lemon juice and sugar is always my 'filling' (is there a better word?) of choice!

-Peter
 

philjo

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I used spelt flour, egg and whole milk for the batter and let it rest in the fridge for 90 minutes.
Squeezed half an orange over the cooked pancake and a light sprinkle of cinnamon. No sugar added. The pancakes were pudding for dinner this evening.
 

Hardcastle

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No measure method :

Chuck some flour in a bowl
Add 1 Egg (whisk first)
Pour in a small amount of milk

Whisk like crazy. Slowly add milk, Whisk like crazy, add more milk, keep whisking. When your batter is at the consistency you want (personal preference), stop adding milk.

Tips and tricks :

  • 1 egg is usually more than you need. Get a decent sized egg and you don't need two. This prevent the batter from tasting to "eggy" Its also better to make multiple batches than one big giant mixture.
  • When you have your personal consistency make sure you whisk it to within an inch of its life. When the surface has lots of small bubbles that dont pop then your good to go. This will give you a lighter pancake and if your making any American style or Drop scone it will give you a better fluffy texture.
  • Lard is awesome. The modern stuff has almost no flavour and Lard can take much higher temperatures. Always choose an oil that has a higher smoke point. You can be pretty frugal with your oil and just use enough to coat the pan. Too much and you will burn the edges of your pancake.
  • Hot is good, scorching is bad. The old fashioned way (I was taught) was to heat the pan till the oil starts to smoke and then turn the pan off. That way you are using the residual heat to cook the pancake rather than cooking it or burning it.
  • Use a griddle pan or a good solid heavy based pan. They retain the heat more and dont warp. The modern crepe/pancake pans tend to be thin and can burn the pancakes
  • Use a Deep ladle ! spoon off the edges so you dont drip anywhere. Dont overfill it. Keep the ladle nice and low in the pan and then a small twist of the wrist, slowly pour into the centre. DO NOT move the ladle all over the place. If you keep the ladle pouring the batter into the centre of the pan it will slowly drift outwards and form a pretty decent circle.
  • Dont panic, just watch the pancake cooking, when you start to see small bubbles forming all over the surface and the batter changes colour, its ready to flip/turn.

Alternatives :

Use self raising flour for the American/Drop scone style. (Baking powder/Bicarb not really needed)
Add some caster sugar in the batter for a little sweetness.


My preference is Scotch Pancakes (Drop scones) with a little bit of lemon and sugar. We always eat ours fresh from the pan. Just drop onto a plate and let the kids do what they want. I just keep cracking out the pancakes and they keep giving me empty plates. My Daughter makes awesome pancakes :)


Happy Pancake Day.
I do think we should have a recipe of the day if that's to much once a week.
 

hexagon789

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They’re the thicker “breakfast” style pancakes, as opposed to the traditional ones eaten in the UK (that I thought were for dinner).
Strictly speaking I think you mean England(!); Scotch pancakes are thicker like American ones albeit smaller sized. I don't mind either though, a pancake's a pancake.

(And yes I'm fully aware we eat the thin almost crêpe-like ones up here as well but I just wanted to point out that the thicker ones are more traditional in Scotland.)
 

High Dyke

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Sweet filling here, usually strawberry jam. Also had blackberry vinegar in the past. This year the Mem had greengage jam whilst I had Sicilian lemon curd.
 

hexagon789

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Sweet filling here, usually strawberry jam. Also had blackberry vinegar in the past. This year the Mem had greengage jam whilst I had Sicilian lemon curd.
The greengage jam sounds interesting, I had just raspberry jam and clotted cream that needed consumed ;)
 

hexagon789

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The Men has quite a few jars of the homemade jam in.
The local church has a nice selection of homemade jam at their Xmas fayre which I always like to get some of, but I've yet to have anything more adventurous than gooseberry!
 

PG

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Oh, and its shrove Tuesday not pancake day ;) ( no, i have no idea what a shrove is either or why it gets a Tuesday)
Blame the Catholic church! This dictionary definition explains shrove,
shrive
v. shrove shrived, shriv•en shrived, shriv•ing. v.t.
1. to impose penance on (a sinner).​
2. to grant absolution to (a penitent).​
3. to confess one's sins, as to a priest.​
The reason its a Tuesday is due to Tuesday being the day of the week immediately before Ash Wednesday which is the start of Lent.
Anyone who wishes to know more - proceed at your own risk ;)
 

LSWR Cavalier

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Every day can be pancake day. I make more than I need just for tea, they keep a couple of days, great as cheese sandwiches when walking or cycling
 

nlogax

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Happy Full-of-Yesterday's Pancakes Day!

One for @Mojo from my favourite Jersey City diner which I'm aching to return to. Don't worry, the syrup jug is present and correct but just out of shot ;)

Pancakes, eggs and bacon from VIP Diner, Journal Square, NJ
 

johntea

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I miss going to America and having pancakes in Denny's, and not being judged if I want steak for breakfast and cereal for dinner of course ;)
 

DynamicSpirit

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Simples: 100g plain flour, 2 large eggs, 300ml milk, into a bowl, then whisk to a smooth batter. Best practice is to let your batter rest. You don't want a tired batter. Decent quality frying pan, touch of fat, decent but not roasting heat. 1 minute each side. Loads of sugar based products poured onto the finished product. Jobs a good un. Repeat until diabetes sets in.

This post (almost) inspired me... I used to love home-made pancakes but haven't made any for so many decades that I'd forgotten how to do it. So after reading this, I resolved to try your recipe... today.

But first, I thought I should google to double check the recipe, and
look what I almost immediately found:

BBCGoodFood said:
STEP 1
Put 100g plain flour, 2 large eggs, 300ml milk, 1 tbsp sunflower or vegetable oil and a pinch of salt into a bowl or large jug, then whisk to a smooth batter.

So, either you secretly work for the BBC writing good food guides, or the BBC are ripping off your post! :lol:

Oh and the final result... I dug out my whisk, checked I had everything, went on a cycle ride, came home and fell asleep. Now it's too late in the evening to start cooking. Guess I'm not cut out for this diabetes lark..
 

DarloRich

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It isnt off the bbc website. It is in my cook book via my gran and mum (updated to ml/g obvs as i have no idea what a fluid ounce is!)

Anyway it is hardly a trade secret. It is just a plain batter mix. You dont put oil or salt in though.

PS the secret is a good clean pan.
 

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