Paris Métro Unit Number Query

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CC 72100

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G = Greasing.

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/MF_67

Certaines remorques sont équipées de graisseurs de voies ; les rames avec ces remorques portent un « G » à l'avant à côté du numéro de rame, pour « graisseuse ».

Certain cars are equipped with track greasers - these units have a 'G' on the front next to the unit number, indicating 'greaser'
 

notadriver

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Does anyone know why all metro trains have a window in the cab door so giving a 'cab ride' view ? This isn't a feature on their main line trains.
 

317666

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Thanks a lot!

I'm not sure for the reasoning behind the window but I must say it's a welcome feature for an enthusiast.
 

Peter Mugridge

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It's actually a supposedly one-way glass mirror to allow the driver to see what is going on in the carriage, but it's just not as strongly reflective as you might expect for the purpose.

Not that any of us are complaining, of course! :D
 

CC 72100

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It's actually a supposedly one-way glass mirror to allow the driver to see what is going on in the carriage, but it's just not as strongly reflective as you might expect for the purpose.

Not that any of us are complaining, of course! :D

Interestingly enough this feature is as present on old stock as it is on new stuff - the new units that have been introduced on line 2, then 5 and when I left Paris line 9, still has the window/mirror on the door.
 

317666

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Interestingly enough this feature is as present on old stock as it is on new stuff - the new units that have been introduced on line 2, then 5 and when I left Paris line 9, still has the window/mirror on the door.

I thought it was actually easier to see through on the MF01s than on older stock! Speaking of which, I thought that the MF01s were a pretty good design - very smooth and quiet compared to say 2009 Stock.
 

CC 72100

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Speaking of which, I thought that the MF01s were a pretty good design - very smooth and quiet compared to say 2009 Stock.

The MF01 stock is nice, and its therefore no surprise that it's been introduced on new lines. Although I can't compare to the 2009 stock, having never used it, it is worth remembering that Paris metro speeds are considerably slower than the London Underground. There is also obviously much less PIS on the MF01s, although the light diagrams above the door are pretty self-explanatory.
 

notadriver

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Mmm surely MF01s should be compared to S Stock in terms of being sub surface stock?
 

CC 72100

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Mmm surely MF01s should be compared to S Stock in terms of being sub surface stock?

Line 5 and 9 are mostly underground, while Line 2 spends a fair bit of time above ground.

There is no real comparison on the Paris metro that can be made with S stock, particularly on the metropolitan line, as the Paris metro covers much shorter distances and does not go out into suburbia.
 

NicholasNCE

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I suppose notadriver was making reference to the fact most of the Paris metro and indeed the MF01 equipped lines were built using the cut-and-cover technique and as such would be classified as sub-surface lines in London.

Concerning extensions into suburbia, nothing to the extent of LUL but lines 5, 7, 8 & 13 go quite far out of Paris "intra-muros"!
 

CC 72100

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I suppose notadriver was making reference to the fact most of the Paris metro and indeed the MF01 equipped lines were built using the cut-and-cover technique and as such would be classified as sub-surface lines in London.

Concerning extensions into suburbia, nothing to the extent of LUL but lines 5, 7, 8 & 13 go quite far out of Paris "intra-muros"!

Fair enough - we were obviously thinking on two different wavelengths.

Hmm, I suppose the 7 certainly does going down to Villejuif and the 8 to Créteil. Bobigny at the northern end of the line 5 isn't that far out (even though yes, it is out of Paris itself).

Saint-Denis on the 13 is a reasonable way out again, although nothing compared to say the Met or bits of the Central line.
 
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