Person Hit by Train near Putney.

Discussion in 'UK Railway Discussion' started by Deepgreen, 9 Jun 2015.

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  1. Deepgreen

    Deepgreen Established Member

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    Unfortunately, someone has been hit by a train near Putney. Looking at RTT, it appears that at least one train (2V31) which was bound for Waterloo, reversed at Barnes and took the Kingston loop non-stop to arrive around 45 minutes later at Clapham Junction's platform 7! Strangely too, RTT shows it as Standard class seating only, but timed for 100mph maximum.
     
  2. TEW

    TEW Established Member

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    Timing load sounds correct for me. Most stuff on the Hounslow Loop is timed for a 450 (so 100mph correct), but with First Class declassified. They were previously worked by the Standard Class only 450/5s.
     
  3. Deepgreen

    Deepgreen Established Member

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    One of the vagaries of RTT I suppose, as there is nowhere that 100mph is permitted and therefore the timing cannot be based upon that speed being achieved, even though the stock may be capable of it. Anyway, the main point here was that the train reversed to take the whole Kingston loop non-stop (presumably).
     
    Last edited: 10 Jun 2015
  4. HarleyDavidson

    HarleyDavidson Established Member

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    Incorrect.

    100 mph running is currently authorised for Classes 43 (HST), 442, 444 & 450 between:

    Down Fast - Farnborough East & Old Basing and from Parlour Gates (Oakley) to Allbrook (Eastleigh).

    Up Fast - Allbrook (Eastleigh) - Oakley and Basingstoke Barton Mill to Wey Navigation Canal (M25).
     
  5. kieron

    kieron Established Member

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    Think of the speed as part of the identifier for the type of train expected rather than a statement of any speed achieved.

    For example, two of the types of train which run between Chester and Crewe are timed as 90mph 158s and 100mph 158s. The latter are a few minutes faster on the section, not because they get above 90mph there, but because they're actually 175s, which have better acceleration.

    In the same way, a "90mph Electric Multiple Unit" would be something other than a 450.
     
  6. Deepgreen

    Deepgreen Established Member

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    I know, but not on any part of the Waterloo to Windsor route (or any other suburban route), which is what this working was.
     
  7. yorkie

    yorkie Administrator Staff Member Administrator

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    True, but the maximum speed of the track isn't whats relevant when choosing a timing load.
    It's nothing to do with the website 'Realtimetrains' which is one of many open data sites
    Indeed it's not.
    Agreed.

    TEW is right; the timing load is not unexpected.
     
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