Pictures of staff

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Eeveevolve

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Just witnessed a bunch of tourists on the train. Taking pictures of anything that moves ad they di. So the conductor comes down doing ticket checks and notices they take a picture of them. Walks straight up to them and said "could you please delete that picture of me as it is an offence to take pictures of staff".
They complied of course and everyone carries on.

But such a great advert for the UK. Land of the free....
 
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AlterEgo

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I'd be uncomfortable about people I didn't know taking pictures of me when I was working.

This is why I'm not a model. ;) Haaaa...

But seriously, it would make me uncomfortable. I wouldn't take pictures specifically of people randomly without their permission, and especially not in a foreign country.
 

PaxVobiscum

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Just witnessed a bunch of tourists on the train. Taking pictures of anything that moves ad they di. So the conductor comes down doing ticket checks and notices they take a picture of them. Walks straight up to them and said "could you please delete that picture of me as it is an offence to take pictures of staff".
They complied of course and everyone carries on.

But such a great advert for the UK. Land of the free....
It can happen by accident as well. I've was filming junior walking down an the aisle of an almost empty coach with no other pax visible when the train manager appears out of the cubby hole without warning and blocks the shot. I'm fairly sure the TM could have seen what I was doing on the CCTV if she had looked but I couldn't see her.

Obviously I grovelled to pacify her but it was unfortunate.
 

starrymarkb

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I will say that being the target of unwanted photos isn't nice. Photographers have become a real problem at the Whitby Goth Weekends. They won't ask and will just try and grab pictures of any Goth girl they see, often blocking streets. Also you get people trying to get sneaky snaps almost constantly, while trying to hide the camera.* Wave-Gotik-Treffen was very bad for it as well.

Unfortunately as they are on the public highway there is nothing to legally stop them (unless they are blocking and get witnessed by a Policeman.)

I suspect if they asked first (which is only polite) they might have had a different reaction. Unfortunately they don't (and often they are doing commercial photography, its not nice to find a crap photo of you up for sale)


*I summed it up once as "This photo shows some Goths spreading the darkness by buying food and beer in the local supermarket"
 
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PaxVobiscum

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Here's the usual, private property, privacy etc.

It technically isn't a 'public place' blah blah...

Oh, and this is far from the land of the free...
After a ScotRail guard took exception to me filming out the window of "his train" and told me it was illegal to use a camera on a train at all, I wrote to ScotRail about it. I was initially told to apply for a filming permit in advance on each occasion (which on my next outing would have involved payment of £1292.50 each for the three hour outward and return journeys which seemed a little excessive for a family day trip) then when I queried this I was told
I appreciate your concerns regarding completing the formal application form and I can advise the rules for filming relate to commercial filming only, where the equipment needed is significant. It appears from your correspondence that your recordings will be for family use only and I understand that it will not involve any other passengers or staff. I can confirm that if you are only using a standard handheld video camera the rules do not apply.
I carry this letter with me on ScotRail trains now, but I haven't needed it yet I'm glad to say.
 
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A charter was due at Par in the Summer so the windows were open. A couple of people took pictures on tip toes of the box interior, which was fine, until some goon seemed intent of getting a shot of me at the levers. The window was abruptly slammed shut spoiling things for everyone.
 

Mutant Lemming

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This is one of those 'play it by ear' kind of things. Taking a flash picture of oncoming trains even from public property is not a good idea, taking detailed pictures of nuclear waste trains is probably not a good idea either but being quoted the 'anti-terrorism act' while taking a picture of the station sign at Manchester Piccadilly does seem a bit daft.
Apart from the first two instances quoted there appears to be no coherent policy regarding photography and no universal application of any rules across the network. It's almost a case of if no one bothers you then it should be okay.
Taking pictures of individuals without asking will always run a risk. My late brother was very touchy about it and got in to trouble for knocking out someone who took his picture. He was spared a custodial sentence due to 'provocation'. Would probably have gotten off scot free if 'taking a photograph is akin to stealing one's soul' had been part of his belief system.
Incidentally, why not have the next photo competition 'Nuclear Waste Trains' ?
 

Wyvern

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Deliberately taking a photo of a person is one thing (rather vague issues of privacy). Taking a photo of a general scene of a public place where people "can expect to be seen" is another.

Even so I am wary of getting workmen in a scene since the day I accidentally included a Network Rail chap painting a fence without his hard hat on. (The photo would have appeared in Wikipedia had I used it)
 

EM2

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It is a way of trying to impress friends. Usually it's groups of teenage girls on Saturdays do it. Probably to put it on their Facebook or something.
When I was out on stations, a number of times I was asked by groups of attractive young ladies if they could have their picture taken with me. I'm not going to complain about that!
However, if I was just doing my general duties and I noticed someone *specifically* taking my picture, rather than taking a picture I might just happen to be in, I might think a lot differently.
 

Bungle73

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Deliberately taking a photo of a person is one thing (rather vague issues of privacy). Taking a photo of a general scene of a public place where people "can expect to be seen" is another.

Even so I am wary of getting workmen in a scene since the day I accidentally included a Network Rail chap painting a fence without his hard hat on. (The photo would have appeared in Wikipedia had I used it)
Painting a fence without his hard hat on?
 

Anon Mouse

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I would not be happy at somebody taking my photo at work, especially when they start to use phone cameras as a way to beat us. Obviously if I accidently get in the shot then I'm not too bothered. I just find it a bit creepy when somebody asks to take my photo!
 

SS4

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Just witnessed a bunch of tourists on the train. Taking pictures of anything that moves ad they di. So the conductor comes down doing ticket checks and notices they take a picture of them. Walks straight up to them and said "could you please delete that picture of me as it is an offence to take pictures of staff".
They complied of course and everyone carries on.

But such a great advert for the UK. Land of the free....
Such as the freedom to not have your picture taken without your permission ;)

I am not staff but I would much rather not have my picture taken, especially without my permission and since the photographer owns the copyright they can put it virtually anywhere or even forfeit the picture to the public domain where anyone can do anything.

How many times have we seen the rights of the photographer but not the rights of the subject?
 

GadgetMan

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Trouble is people don't just take pictures for themselves anymore. A very large number of people feel the need to then go and publish the pictures they've taken online. I don't want my picture posted over the internet, I don't do it myself and do not want anyone else doing it on my behalf. So if I see someone attempting to take a pic of me while at work they are told it isn't on. Now if they find it offensive so be it, that's my personal choice and it is something I am entitled to. I'm there to get people from A-B safely, protect revenue and provide passengers with information as and when required as well as make their journey a pleasant one. However, despite what a lot of passengers may think, I am not there to lick their backsides for them and jump when they demand; to a height they specify.
 

PaxVobiscum

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No he was on the platform. Even so he was expected to wear his hard hat.

Crazy I know, but I've experienced the same H&S b***s when I used to work on building sites.
As in 'No hat = no job'. Seen it a few times. Gets the message across much effectively than the usual forest of signs which are information overload.
 

lincolnshire

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No hard hat on when painting fence, yes if someone saw it in Network Rail he could be disciplined for it even down to been sacked if it had happened before. Thats the sort of management there is in Network Rail these days, they the types who sit in offices all day and know everything about H&S experts. All office staff should be made to wear hard hats sat at there desks for a day every month then they would know what its like to wear them all day.
How did we carry on in the past!
P.S. when are we going to issue passengers with hard hats to stand on platforms waiting for trains, will there be a baby sized one as well?
 

SS4

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No hard hat on when painting fence, yes if someone saw it in Network Rail he could be disciplined for it even down to been sacked if it had happened before. Thats the sort of management there is in Network Rail these days, they the types who sit in offices all day and know everything about H&S experts. All office staff should be made to wear hard hats sat at there desks for a day every month then they would know what its like to wear them all day.
How did we carry on in the past!
P.S. when are we going to issue passengers with hard hats to stand on platforms waiting for trains, will there be a baby sized one as well?
There is usually a reason for it beyond petty middle management. Often it's because someone could (and has) sued.
 

lincolnshire

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Hard hats was hardly seen on the railways until Balfour Beatty come on the scene and introduced them on East Coast Contract.
Now its all image in Network Rails case these days.
Do you have to wear one all day SS4 then out on the track in all weathers?
 

Wyvern

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However, the point is - be careful of getting rail staff in your picture in case you inadvertently drop them in the brown stuff.
 

SS4

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Hard hats was hardly seen on the railways until Balfour Beatty come on the scene and introduced them on East Coast Contract.
Now its all image in Network Rails case these days.
Do you have to wear one all day SS4 then out on the track in all weathers?
Haven't the foggiest, I'm not staff :p
 

455driver

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If someone deliberately takes a picture of me, I take a picture of them*, I carry a small digital camera with me when at work.

Its funny how they remonstrate that I am breaking the law etc but its okay for them to do it.

* I mean deliberately taking my picture NOT a picture of the train I am driving which is fine, I just hope my shiny forehead doesnt ruin the shot.:lol:
 

ralphchadkirk

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Trouble is people don't just take pictures for themselves anymore. A very large number of people feel the need to then go and publish the pictures they've taken online. I don't want my picture posted over the internet, I don't do it myself and do not want anyone else doing it on my behalf. So if I see someone attempting to take a pic of me while at work they are told it isn't on. Now if they find it offensive so be it, that's my personal choice and it is something I am entitled to. I'm there to get people from A-B safely, protect revenue and provide passengers with information as and when required as well as make their journey a pleasant one. However, despite what a lot of passengers may think, I am not there to lick their backsides for them and jump when they demand; to a height they specify.
However you do not have the authority to get the photo deleted. The only way that would happen is if you got a Court Order.
 

exile

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I can't remember this being an issue decades ago - there are many photos and films taken years ago showing drivers and other rail staff. I suppose in those days people were happy to be thought interesting enough to be photo'd or filmed.
 

Minilad

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I dread to think how many times I have had my photo taken at work. Not a great deal I can do about it most of the time though.
Although I must admit if I am standing at a platform and someone is taking a picture of my train I tend to try and get out of the shot by leaning or turning away
 
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