Rails in the Road - not tramways

Discussion in 'Infrastructure & Stations' started by Mutant Lemming, 10 Feb 2019.

  1. Fawkes Cat

    Fawkes Cat Member

    Messages:
    292
    Joined:
    8 May 2017
    I don't think anyone has mentioned Slough Trading Estate yet. I grew up around there and can remember seeing a moving train once (and I am 52).

    So does this mean that only Slough and Trafford (both early and large trading estates) were rail linked, rather than individual factories with company sidings?
     
  2. alangla

    alangla Member

    Messages:
    332
    Joined:
    11 Apr 2018
    Location:
    Glasgow
    It’s more likely to be South Street in Whiteinch. Can’t remember the exact details off the top of my head, but each of the North British & Caledonian built lines from the city to Clydebank. One of these is still open and serves Partick, Yoker etc, the other runs nearer the river and is closed west of Exhibition Centre, with a lot of it being a cycle track. The Exhibition Centre to Kelvinhaugh grade separated junction is a BR creation from the 1970s. Anyway, one or other of these lines used the tramways to get wagons from the heavy rail network to industrial premises, using the small electric locos already mentioned.
     
  3. Altfish

    Altfish Member

    Messages:
    932
    Joined:
    16 Oct 2014
    Location:
    Altrincham
    This map is best for such things...
    http://www.railmaponline.com/UKIEMap.php
    ..find Farnborough and have a look at the lines round about it. There are plenty.
     
  4. Red Onion

    Red Onion Member

    Messages:
    14
    Joined:
    4 Apr 2012
    Location:
    Aberdeen
    There’s still an isolated section of track, with points, just past the ferry terminal in Aberdeen. There’s development work going on though, so not sure how long it will last.
     
  5. DarloRich

    DarloRich Veteran Member

    Messages:
    20,015
    Joined:
    12 Oct 2010
    Location:
    Work - Fenny Stratford(MK) Home - Darlington
    The strangest one I know of is at Woodlesford. There is a small length of completely isolated track set in the road which I assume is an old level crossing for the old colliery

    I suspect this is the case for any town or city with docks let alone a shipbuilding industry. I seem to remember rails in the road on/near the Quayside in Newcastle
     
  6. Beebman

    Beebman Member

    Messages:
    45
    Joined:
    17 Feb 2011
    When I visited Chicago five years ago I took a trip on the South Shore Line to Michigan City where full-size trains (including double-deck EMUs) run through the streets. There's a load of videos in YouTube, this is a more recent one:

     
  7. Brian M

    Brian M Member

    Messages:
    14
    Joined:
    14 Oct 2017
    Location:
    Witney
    DS377 at Newhaven.jpg

    In Newhaven (Sussex) there was a branch from the main line which crossed the river by a joint road/rail swing bridge to get access to the various yards on the west side of the harbour.
    Picture from my collection c.1950/60.
     
  8. itsonlyme

    itsonlyme Member

    Messages:
    65
    Joined:
    24 Jul 2012
    Ages ago, not long after Noah's Ark was scrapped.

    In Southport from Blowick station yard along Crowland Street to Southport Gas Works. Late for School a few mornings due to standing watching.
     
  9. dazzler

    dazzler Member

    Messages:
    37
    Joined:
    6 Apr 2018
    Location:
    York
    This is presumably the one on Eshald Lane? Here?

    This was between the colliery sidings at Water Haigh Pit and the quarry to the north east of Eshald Lane. I grew up in a Coal Board house on Rutland Close, overlooking the pit. If I stood on the kitchen table, I could watch the NCB steam shunters in the sidings. We moved out of that house in 1973/4 and those rails were long disused by then. Amazing that they've survived to this day!
     
  10. DarloRich

    DarloRich Veteran Member

    Messages:
    20,015
    Joined:
    12 Oct 2010
    Location:
    Work - Fenny Stratford(MK) Home - Darlington
    Last edited: 11 Feb 2019
  11. duffield

    duffield Member

    Messages:
    491
    Joined:
    31 Jul 2013
    My take on it would be that the Weymouth Quay line is a not a tramway in tram terms (#1) but is a tramway in railway terms (#2).

    Tramway definition #1: Any rails (street running or not) which principally convey trams, excluding parts of the national railway network conveying tram-trains (i.e. Rotherham)

    Tramway definition #2: A part of the rail network which runs along the street in a a street-running tramway style, despite not carrying any trams!

    If all terminology was logical, I guess #2 would be called something like a 'tramway style' or 'street running' railway.
     
  12. etr221

    etr221 Member

    Messages:
    175
    Joined:
    10 Mar 2018
    I suspect that the line was defined and described as a Tramway in the Act under which it was constructed; and that this term has been used in all formal, and most informal, naming ever since.
     
  13. randyrippley

    randyrippley Established Member

    Messages:
    1,614
    Joined:
    21 Feb 2016
    Liverpool docks had a lot, some of the tracks can still be seen along Regent Road
    But even small docks had them - for instance Lancaster had sidings in the road alongside the "New Quay" (downstream of Carlisle Bridge). There was a small narrow gauge system there as well, which seems to be undocumented
     
  14. 50039

    50039 Member

    Messages:
    176
    Joined:
    8 Mar 2015
    Location:
    Tring
    Wow - thanks - one of those routes goes directly under the building I work in now!
     
  15. ChiefPlanner

    ChiefPlanner Established Member

    Messages:
    4,852
    Joined:
    6 Sep 2011
    Location:
    Herts
    Another one - Mistley Quay
     
  16. Roose

    Roose Member

    Messages:
    135
    Joined:
    23 May 2014
    A number of road crossings operated on Barrow Island among the shipyard and engineering works premises.

    A narrow, single-carriageway bridge onto the island along the 'Low Road' also carried the main railway track access to the north side of the shipyard embedded in its centre, making concentration essential when cycling over it to avoid wheels in the grooves.
     
  17. Dr_Paul

    Dr_Paul Member

    Messages:
    499
    Joined:
    3 Sep 2013
    Great Yarmouth had a lengthy quayside line that ran in the road for some of the way. See this map (north), this one (centre) and this one (south). It seems to get tied up a little with the tram, but I don't think they actually connected. There were still rails in the quayside when I visited Yarmouth in the mid-1960s, but I can't recall whether they were still in use.

    There was still a rail connection in use to the dock at Lowestoft in the mid-1960s, but this was more a case of the line merely crossing the main road by the station rather than running along a street. I recall that the wagons were pulled in and out of the dock area by an agricultural tractor; my dad told me that when he visited the town around 1950, the LNER four-wheel steam tractors were in use. I would have liked to have seen one of them.
     
  18. jopsuk

    jopsuk Veteran Member

    Messages:
    11,819
    Joined:
    13 May 2008
  19. Wychwood93

    Wychwood93 Member

    Messages:
    191
    Joined:
    25 Jan 2018
    Location:
    Burton. Dorset.
  20. ac6000cw

    ac6000cw Established Member

    Messages:
    1,639
    Joined:
    10 May 2014
    Location:
    Cambridge, UK
    Years ago I visited Bellevue, Iowa - one of the places on that list - and watched a long freight (about 130 freight cars, I think) rumble rumble through town - it's actually mostly ballasted track in the highway median but with the tarmac right up to the ends of the sleepers - Google streetview: https://www.google.com/maps/@42.258...=77.30806&pitch=0&thumbfov=100!7i13312!8i6656 - quite interesting to watch, as long as you're not in a hurry to get from one side of town to the other! The line itself is a secondary mainline.

    Also alongside the town is a very large weir and lock (about 35m x 200m) on the Mississippi river - the river barges are huge in that part of world.

    Most of those 'mainline' street running sections came about of course because the railway arrived first then the town grew up around it, effectively marooning the track in the middle of 'main street' in some cases.
     
  21. OliverS

    OliverS Member

    Messages:
    101
    Joined:
    5 Dec 2011
    I remember wagons on the quay at Mistley. I think there was an 08 tucked away somewhere to shift them around. I seem to recall that the railway was mentioned in one of the court cases about turning part of the quay into a village green.
     
  22. ac6000cw

    ac6000cw Established Member

    Messages:
    1,639
    Joined:
    10 May 2014
    Location:
    Cambridge, UK
  23. ChiefPlanner

    ChiefPlanner Established Member

    Messages:
    4,852
    Joined:
    6 Sep 2011
    Location:
    Herts
    The 08 used to clonk down from Manningtree , maybe having shunted the chemical works at Brantham. Not much traffic at either. There was some confusion over the private siding agreement at Mistley , resolved in the end without legislation.
     
  24. PeterC

    PeterC Established Member

    Messages:
    1,612
    Joined:
    29 Sep 2014
    I don't know about Trafford but the original intention at Slough was to provide a fully serviced site so it had its own railway network serving the factory units. When I worked there in the 90s there were still bits of track visible along the front of some units and a couple of others with very obvious loading docks for rail wagons. The link to the main line was by a reserved track that was later used for a pipeline.
     
  25. mailbyrail

    mailbyrail Member

    Messages:
    84
    Joined:
    23 Dec 2010
    I worked in Great Yarmouth in 1974-5 and the quay to the South of Southtown Bridge alongside the Town Hall was still rail served and used occasionally. I remember MCO wagons of scrap being unloaded for loading onto a ship, the wagons were effectively parked in the street on the quayside.
     
  26. Cletus

    Cletus Established Member

    Messages:
    1,647
    Joined:
    11 Dec 2010
    Location:
    Dover
    Trains used to run along along Dover sea front (until 1964).

    Used to have man with a red flag walking in front of it to stop people parking cars.


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    (not my pictures, I'm much too young!)
     
  27. alexl92

    alexl92 Established Member

    Messages:
    1,591
    Joined:
    12 Oct 2014
    I never knew Huddersfield had a tram system. Are there any photos or maps? Did heavy rail stock ever run on it?
     
  28. matchmaker

    matchmaker Member

    Messages:
    868
    Joined:
    8 Mar 2009
    Location:
    Central Scotland
    It wasn't South Street as it had no tram service, but will be Govan Road on the south side of the river. I was brought up in Scotstoun and can recall a train on the South Street tracks ("Whiteinch Tramway" was the official name), but it was pulled by a steam shunting loco.
     
  29. Southsider

    Southsider Member

    Messages:
    357
    Joined:
    10 Aug 2015
    I think it was Stobcross Street, now covered over by the Clydeside Expressway that was the best example of street rail lines in Glasgow. Cars had narrow tyres in those days so you had to avoid getting caught in the tracks - particularly amusing when a Reliant Robin was misdirected by the points!
     
  30. Calthrop

    Calthrop Established Member

    Messages:
    1,246
    Joined:
    6 Dec 2015
    (My bolding) -- "off at a tangent"; but to the best of my knowledge, "cowcatcher" is the correct and preferred term in the UK for this locomotive feature. The alternative word best known to me is "pilot"; but in my perception, that word is used in North America (where that appurtenance was far more common than in these islands) more than it is here.

    Curiosity moved me to Google "cowcatcher"; doing which, didn't prove very illuminating. One particular "hit" claimed to furnish 89(!) synonyms for "cowcatcher"; but a fairly quick look at the item was enough to show that the objective was, basically, fooling-around. Three words given and marked as "close synonyms" were "pilot", "fender", and "buffer" (re the last, railway enthusiasts' response will be "I think not"); after that, things got into wild and arcane military-and-armourers' realms, and with nowhere near the promised 89 words actually in evidence.
     

Share This Page