Railway books discussion

Calthrop

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@Albaman: I had not before heard of this series; or, indeed, I think, of the firm of Foxline. Could I ask -- are all books in the series to do with north-west England, or do they cover areas further afield also?

The one as described by you, I feel that I'd find to be a "read", and a "look-at", as it were, of considerable interest. However, to be quite honest, I reckon that that would occur if the book came my way by "happenstance" -- one such which dealt with a part of the country where I had spent much time, including "way back", I'd be more likely to actively seek out. Meaning no disrespect to an area which you plainly know well, and love; it's just that I come from elsewhere in England, and have spent little time in the north-west and feel no particular attachment to it. Will however from now on, keep an eye out for works in this series.
 
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S&CLER

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@Albaman: I had not before heard of this series; or, indeed, I think, of the firm of Foxline. Could I ask -- are all books in the series to do with north-west England, or do they cover areas further afield also?

The one as described by you, I feel that I'd find to be a "read", and a "look-at", as it were, of considerable interest. However, to be quite honest, I reckon that that would occur if the book came my way by "happenstance" -- one such which dealt with a part of the country where I had spent much time, including "way back", I'd be more likely to actively seek out. Meaning no disrespect to an area which you plainly know well, and love; it's just that I come from elsewhere in England, and have spent little time in the north-west and feel no particular attachment to it. Will however from now on, keep an eye out for works in this series.
You would, I think, find the 6 volumes in this series by W.G. Rear on the railways of North Wales of great interest. They are from west to east: Anglesey Branch Lines, Bangor, Caernarvon and Afonwen/Llanberis, Conwy Valley, Corwen to Rhyl, and the Denbigh-Mold line. Turning to Mid-Wales, there are 3 other volumes om the Llangollen line, the Cambrian Coast and Bala to Blaenau (the last not by Rear).
The great strength of the series, after the lavish illustration, was the excellent track diagrams. Greg Fox, the publisher, I understand, was a professional draughtsman on the railway. There were also good volumes on the Buxton line (2 volumes), the High Peak, and the Buxton-Ashbourne branch as well as those on the northwest of England mentioned above; and some on the GC line (3 vols on Woodhead, and 2 more on the GC south of Sheffield).
 
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Calthrop

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@S&CLER: thank you ! I would for sure find most interesting: the North Wales, Mid-Wales, and Peak District, books in the series, as per your description. Am seeing as a surprising "gap in my education", my having been until now oblivious to this particular element of the British railway-books scene. I've long been aware of the "Forgotten Railways" and "Lost Railways" bodies of work -- kind-of out of the same stable, I feel, though not with exactly the same remit (and, one would feel, less detailed and scholarly); but the material discussed here over the past few days, had passed me by.
 

Mcr Warrior

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@Albaman: I had not before heard of this series; or, indeed, I think, of the firm of Foxline. Could I ask -- are all books in the series to do with north-west England, or do they cover areas further afield also?
Link below to the various books still in print under the 'Foxline' imprint. When they were first published, their titles did seem to concentrate on railway lines in the Manchester and surrounding area, but in subsequent years, they did then cover areas a little further afield, such as North and mid Wales.

 

Calthrop

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Link below to the various books still in print under the 'Foxline' imprint. When they were first published, their titles did seem to concentrate on railway lines in the Manchester and surrounding area, but in subsequent years, they did then cover areas a little further afield, such as North and mid Wales.


Many thanks !
 

S&CLER

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Link below to the various books still in print under the 'Foxline' imprint. When they were first published, their titles did seem to concentrate on railway lines in the Manchester and surrounding area, but in subsequent years, they did then cover areas a little further afield, such as North and mid Wales.

Are the BookLaw reprints on art paper like the originals were? Some of the Book Law reprints of other titles I've seen seem to be a bit muddy in photo reproduction.
 

Mcr Warrior

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Have over a dozen of the various 'Book Law' / 'Foxline' titles, and the ones published as 'Book Law' all seem to be of a similar standard to the earlier 'Foxline' versions.

The acid test would, of course, be to compare an original with a later reprint, but I try not to do two copies of the same title (although it has been known!) ;)
 

wheeltapper49

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I have just read and thoroughly enjoyed Nigel Kendall's 'last call for steam' published by Amberley books in 2019.
Full of facts and data I found 2 locos 'noted' during his visit to Salisbury on 22nd July 1961 that I believe maybe a mistake. 3206 (at the time shedded at 87J - Fishguard) and 73072 a scottish based loco at the time of his visit. All other entries are feasible. Can anybody throw any light on this mystery? Thanks in advance. Rog.
 

Albaman

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Many thanks to "Calthrop" and " S&CLER " for taking the trouble to comment on my post.

Reading my post again, I was horrified to see that I had omitted the name of the author, Stuart Taylor which was unfortunate.

During these holidays in St.Annes in 1966/67, I went on a number of day trips to various locations one of which was Crewe. My observations of the activity at Crewe station left a lasting impression and books by W.G. ( Bill ) Rear and Allan Baker on the railway operations and infrastructure around Crewe are a much valued part of my collection. I have not seen the other publications by Mr Rear but I have no doubt they are worth a look.

At an event at the beginning of 2020 where Book Law had a sales stand, I spoke to a gentleman and asked about the author and if there had been any contact with him. The gentleman replied in the negative though he did mention there was still interest in his books.

Finally, with regard to the post from "Calthrop", whilst I find details of railways operations in the Blackpool area in the early/mid 1960 fascinating, with due respects to the citizens of the Fylde, I can't honestly say that I love the area ,though I have visited it subsequently. Mr Taylor's books provide an excellent impression of that era and, although out of print, are worth the search.
 

Taunton

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I have just read and thoroughly enjoyed Nigel Kendall's 'last call for steam' published by Amberley books in 2019.
Full of facts and data I found 2 locos 'noted' during his visit to Salisbury on 22nd July 1961 that I believe maybe a mistake. 3206 (at the time shedded at 87J - Fishguard)
Didn't 3206 move on to Templecombe, just down the road from Salisbury, during the year? It was one of the regulars on the S&D in the 1960s. Can't find a 1961 photo, but here it is in 1962:


If it was actually in transit between the two sheds, it's far more straightforward to go via Salisbury than dog-legging via Bristol and Bath.
 

Gloster

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Didn't 3206 move on to Templecombe, just down the road from Salisbury, during the year? It was one of the regulars on the S&D in the 1960s. Can't find a 1961 photo, but here it is in 1962:


If it was actually in transit between the two sheds, it's far more straightforward to go via Salisbury than dog-legging via Bristol and Bath.

Shed by Shed, Part 5 has 3206 at Templecombe from 6/62 to 12/63. It was previously at Goodwick.
 

Taunton

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Just when I was riding on the S&D. I don't have records, but some vague memory is that it was 3206 itself that took me from Highbridge to Evercreech and back, just in that time. The line was about 50-50 between 22xx and 412xx.
 

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