Routeing Guide

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johnnycache

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3 Jan 2012
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I'd like your comments on this

It seems to me that a good rule for maximising the range of routes available for a journey is to select origins and destinations that are related stations rather than routeing points or members of routeing groups

So if A and C are routeing points and B is a related station between the two
and D and F are routeing points and E is a related station between the two:

If you buy a ticket A to D you will only get the routeing options that apply to those two points, similarly A to F, C to D and C to F

But if you buy a ticket from B to E you potentially get all the routeing options for A to D, A to F, C to D and C to F (subject to fare checking)
 
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SickyNicky

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Sometimes that can be the case. But you have identified the main problem with that which is that when using non-routeing point origins and destinations, you have to apply the fares rule.

So unless the intermediate station is the same price or cheaper in both directions, you are likely to exclude one of the associated routeing points anyway.

The advantage of routeing point stations is that fares don't come into it. You are free to trace any route on the maps, regardless of what any intermediate fares might be.
 

hairyhandedfool

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You also have to consider that doubling back is generally not permitted with mapped routes, even if both routeing points pass the fares check rule, and lets not get started on easements.
 
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